Kitchen Cabinet "Remodeling"

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Registered: 09-05-2003
Kitchen Cabinet "Remodeling"
36
Sun, 03-02-2008 - 2:46pm

from http://www.repair-home.com/Cabinetry_Kitchen_Remodeling.html

Cabinetry Kitchen Remodeling

Often your kitchen cabinets can be refinished instead of completely removed. For the most part kitchen cabinets are made to suit your kitchen space and messing with a good thing can be a little risky. Refinishing your kitchen cabinets can be an inexpensive solution that will keep your cabinets looking new for 5 to 10 years.

You will want to start with the cabinets directly underneath your sink. Often these are the first to go and their condition will give you a good idea of how much work you will have to do on the rest of the cabinets. Inspect them for rot due to water. You may have to do some replacing, but this can be kept to minimum.

The shelves above your countertops should be your next kitchen cabinetry remodeling targets. Often these suffer very limited damage, and they should still be in pretty good shape.

Before you start sanding and painting, remove all of the cabinet doors* and cover your countertops with cloth. Mask any other areas that may be damaged during the process. You don’t want you cabinetry kitchen remodeling to turn into a remodeling of your countertops.

Once this is done, fully clean the kitchen cabinets including the handles and hinges. Often, over the course of several years grease and grime can accumulate on the cabinets and a thorough cleaning will let you know just how much work has to be done. You may want to repeat the cleaning procedure a couple of times just to make sure you have removed all of the gunk.

Next, take a piece of sandpaper and give the cabinets a good sanding. This will remove any irregularities and excess grime that was not expunged during the cleaning phase. This will also remove any gloss, leaving the cabinets dull and smooth. This is essential for any future staining or painting.

Clean the cabinets one last time. This gets rid of any dust from sanding that could make your cabinets look unprofessional if you try to paint or varnish over top of them.

Paint and varnish the cabinets to your liking. Keep in mind your total kitchen scheme, so the cabinets blend in seamlessly. You may have to apply several coats, depending on the varnish and the material you are painting.

Now, put the doors back on and replace and hinges or handles that are irreparably damaged. Ta da! You’re done.

*CL Note --- a tip I have seen on television is, when you remove cabinet doors, NUMBER them or label them otherwise so you can find which door goes with which cabinet when it's time to put them back on. There can be subtle size differences and trying to match doors with cabinets is one frustration you can do without!



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Registered: 09-05-2003
Fri, 03-07-2008 - 10:59am

from http://www.kitchen-cabinets-tips.com/cabinetrefacing.html

The main idea behind kitchen cabinet refacing starts when you start getting little bit tired about the look of your formerly so modern looking kitchen. From changing the entire kitchen to only refacing, many different options are available. This article would like to give you some clues on how to get the remodeling process sorted out beforehand and get a better feel of what you can expect after its done.

Without any doubt, cabinet refacing is a very simple and fast approach of getting a new fresh look into one of the most used parts of your home.

Before you get into kitchen remodeling or refacing make sure you see the pros and cons of this approach, compared to changing the entire kitchen.

Advantages of refacing

• Refacing and exchange work on your kitchen cabinet will be done within a very short time. The actual process of changing the fronts of your drawers and doors, together with applying the new surface to the outside of the cabinets is usually done within a day or two. Without lots of dusty work, as little to no adaptation is necessary.

• It is a rather cheap way of getting a totally fresh look into your kitchen, compared to the investment in a new kitchen.

The backside
• Only the look changes. As simple as this, with changing of the fronts of the kitchen, the cabinets and all kitchen appliances still stay the same. So think about that old oven which is now over 20 years old and ask yourself if you still want to use it, even after you changed the kitchen design completely.

If you think about cabinet remodeling, make sure you understand that the result will be a fresh new looking kitchen, with the same cabinets distribution and appliances. “So you might as well think about changing that old kitchen exhaust hood as well at the same time”.

Steps to get your kitchen refaced

1. Find different cabinet makers or kitchen cabinet refacing companies around your area and invite them at your house. Most of the companies have franchisers all over the country, so have a look on the web and at your local yellow pages. Make sure you get at least three different once giving you a quote.

2. Work together with them, get some ideas and have them set up a kitchen design plan or if possible get some kind of 3D picture of what your kitchen would look like after the refacing. Today many refacing companies offer this kind of computer generated kitchen plan.
Make sure you are not just thinking about the optical changes like drawer fronts and doors or islands, but also if there is any need to change further hardware. Like drawer guides, hinges and cabinet shelf boards.

3. Compare the different cost estimates, have a look on the quality of material they are offering and the timeframe they are planning the work will need. Than choose the one out of the refacing companies which you like most and go for it.

4. Usually the work will be done in one or two days, depending on the size of the kitchen. It consists of changing drawer and door fronts, changing the kitchen top (if needed) and reworking the outsides of the cabinets.
So after the entire process, with changing drawer fronts, doors and putting a new kitchen top in, you will have this feeling of beautiful new kitchen. Make sure you spend some extra money and effort in upgrading drawer slides as well. In case you need to upgrade some of your kitchen appliances, you may also want to do it right at the same time as your kitchen cabinet refacing process.



Co-CL for "The Stitcher's Niche" and "Remodel & Renovate" and CL for "Antiques and Collectibles"








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CL for

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-05-2003
Sat, 03-08-2008 - 1:45pm

from http://www.kitchenthoughts.com/cabinets/refacing.php

Refacing your cabinets is a great way to make your kitchen look new when it just isn't reasonable to put in entirely new cabinets. It's relatively affordable, yet gives your kitchen an entirely new look.

Now, refacing your cabinets isn't going to change anything but the appearance of your kitchen. If there are workflow problems, this won't help you at all. However, if you're simply after a beautiful kitchen, this is a great solution.

Refacing can also mean that you can add just a touch of functionality to your cabinets. Newer doors may have add-on features that you'll find quite useful.

When you reface, it isn't just the doors you have to worry about. Typically, there's a veneer to be placed so that the rest of the cabinet matches the new doors. You probably don't want the old cabinets showing through, after all!

Sometimes, however, you can change the interiors at the same time as you reface. Not very much, however, as you're still limited by what the old cabinet was capable of. Drawer glides, for example, can fairly easily be replaced, which is an excellent idea if your drawers aren't working as smoothly as they used to.

Now, if you're thinking about a complete remodel in a few years for your kitchen, refacing is probably not the option you want. There's very little point to replacing the cabinet doors now and then replacing the entire cabinet, door and all, in a few years. If you think you're going to want to tear out your entire kitchen in just a few years, you might want to consider looking at what a simple paint job can do. That option is generally the best one for a short term change.

Make sure you price out what refacing will really cost you. If you're doing it because it's cheaper, do ask for an estimate of what a full remodel would cost as well. There really isn't a good in-between level from refacing to replacing cabinets, as new cabinets won't fit your old countertop and may not work with your old flooring either.



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CL for

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Registered: 09-05-2003
Sun, 03-09-2008 - 10:42am

http://www.kitchenthoughts.com/cabinets/painting.php
Bring out the paint bucket and paint brush! It's time to get a new look in your kitchen!

Now, it really isn't quite that simple. You need to take the cabinet doors off and remove the hardware, for example. But painting your kitchen cabinets can be one of the most affordable ways to refresh the look of your kitchen.

That doesn't mean it's an easy way to refresh your kitchen, however. There's a lot of work involved in putting a coat of paint onto your cabinets that will last a reasonable length of time.

If at all possible, you are best off stripping or sanding down the finish on your cabinets after you have taken the doors and hardware off. If your doors have all kinds of details, this can be pretty difficult, but it's vital to the finished result. Yes, you can try a product such as liquid sandpaper to degloss the finish, but that solution really isn't as good as sanding. Make sure to mark the doors so you can easily put them back where they were.

Fill all holes, nicks and dings so that you'll have the best possible finished product. You don't want a putty that will shrink as it dries or your finished product won't be as smooth as you might like.

It's a good idea to use a good quality primer after sanding. You will probably want to use an oil-based primer if it is available in your area. The reason for this is quite simple; many stains and varnishes are also oil-based, and so the oil-based primer will stick better. Think about how oil and water don't mix and you'll get something of the idea. Oil smells worse and the cleanup is more difficult than when you deal with water-based products, but we're looking for good results here. Oil primers also do better at blocking the old stain from showing through.

However, you can get away with a latex paint on top of an oil-based primer. Primers are made for paint to stick to, after all! You'll have to decide for yourself which you want to use. Oil paints are typically stronger, so they do have an advantage in a hard-use area such as a kitchen. However, if you go with a gloss, or at the very least a semi gloss latex (do NOT use a satin or flat finish in a kitchen - too hard to clean and they won't last!), even latex paint will last reasonably well in a kitchen. Each of these has the advantage of being fairly scrubbable and cope well with the grease that all kitchens produce over time.

One thing we haven't discussed is paint brushes. Trust me and do not go cheap with your paint brushes. It will make a difference! No foam brushes! No rollers! If you want the best possible results, you'll either stick with good quality brushes or maybe even a sprayer.

Now, since you've filled the old hardware holes, you can easily replace your hardware. You probably won't find two-hole handles that exactly fit the old holes, so expect that you will need to drill new holes. Call it motivation for doing a good job on filling in the old holes. New hardware will really add that finishing touch to your kitchen's new look.

Even though you're painting your kitchen because remodeling or refacing costs too much, don't go cheap on your supplies. It's better to spend a little extra and get good tools and good paint now than it is to have to redo the whole thing in a couple years because the cheap paint looks terrible already. Kitchens get too much use for low quality paints to last.



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CL for

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-05-2003
Tue, 03-11-2008 - 10:31am

from http://www.doityourself.com/stry/refacekitchen

Increase Your Home's Value with Cabinet Refacing

Cabinet refacing may be far more prudent than replacing cabinetry in the kitchen, the bath, or both. There are several excellent types cabinet refacing materials from which to choose. You can hire a professional to do the work for you, but many of these options can be utilized by the do-it-yourself homeowner.

Veneer and Edge Banding
Pressure sensitive veneer is a popular choice for cabinet refacing. It is made of cabinet grade wood and gives cabinetry an instant facelift. Veneer is available in many types of wood and in different colors and finishes to complement your design plan. It is fairly simple to apply. While it does take some time and precision, it is far less time consuming, labor intensive, and costly than replacing cabinets.

Wood veneer can even be applied to fiberboard cabinetry to give it a higher quality appearance. You can also purchase edge banding, or strips of veneer to cover exposed edges. Even with the purchase of special veneer tools, the cost will be far less than renovation, yet you will still add a great deal of value to your home. Wood veneer and edge banding can be used for kitchen cabinets, vanities, or any other cabinetry in your home.

Trim and Crown Molding
To give your refacing project a look of quality and craftsmanship, add crown molding to the tops of cabinets and trim molding to the faces. Stain the trim to match the veneer. Molding adds dimension and creates a high end feel. Be sure to miter corners in order to get a professional result.

Painting or Refinishing
Painting or refinishing cabinetry can be a lot of work, but it can help you save a lot of money while still adding value to your home. Your cabinetry may be dark, dingy or dated, but a coat of new stain or a fresh, crisp coat of paint may give it an entirely new look and feel. If you decide to tackle one of these projects, do it right. It takes a good deal of time and energy to achieve professional results, but it’s worth it.

Start by taking the time to prep each surface accordingly, prime surfaces if necessary, and use the proper supplies and tools. For kitchens and baths, oil based paints and primers are generally better choices. They cure to a hard, sleek finish that will last longer and provide for easier maintenance. Also, look for special mold and mildew resistant paints and primers that are formulated especially for kitchens and baths. Choose colors that coordinate with other painting projects or with existing décor elements.

Updated Hardware
You may be surprised to find that all your cabinets need is a thorough cleaning and some updated hardware to change the look and feel. You’ll be amazed what a difference modern looking hardware will make. It is also wise to change out the hardware after a cabinet refacing project. You don’t want to put old hardware back on updated cabinet and drawer faces. When selecting knobs, bars and pulls for cabinets and drawers, choose something distinctive that complements your “new” cabinets as well as the other fixtures in the space.



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CL for

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-05-2003
Wed, 03-12-2008 - 2:15pm

from http://www.doityourself.com/stry/refurbcabinetshelves

Update Your Kitchen Without Installing New Cabinets
By DoItYourself.com Staff

Is it possible to update your kitchen and improve the value of your house without installing brand new cabinets? House flippers and real estate agents will tell you that the kitchen and bathroom are what sell a house; however, installing new cabinets can be costly, especially if you aren't that handy.

You don't have to be handy to update and increase the selling value of your home, and you certainly don't have to install brand new cabinets to increase the beauty of your kitchen. Whether you are planning to sell your home or just looking at updating your space, you can do it simply and easily with some paint and imagination.

The first step is to decide on a color palette for your kitchen. One of the best ways to choose a palette is to go to a fabric store and find a fabric you love. Take colors from the design as your color palette. Purchase enough fabric to make curtains and a table cloth for your kitchen. Take a swatch of fabric with you to the paint store to choose coordinating colors. Or, if you aren't handy with a sewing machine, head to the store and buy kitchen curtains and a matching tablecloth and use that pattern and colors to choose your palette.

Pick a light color from the fabric that isn't very prominent. This will bring that shade out of the fabric and really match your decor nicely. Choose a second color from the fabric that is darker and matches well with the lighter shade. Decide which will be your primary color and secondary color. Perhaps you may want to make the darker color the primary color if your kitchen is quite large, and use the light color for accents.

Clean out your cabinets. Get everything out of the cabinets and give them a good scrub with cleaner. Remove the cabinet doors and lightly sand them. Fix any breaks, cracks or holes with putty and sand even and level. When the cabinets are clean and fixed, prime them and the cabinets in and out with primer paint, which is usually white.

Here is where your imagination comes in. You can create a three-dimensional effect on your plain cabinet doors by taping off a 2 or 3 inch border and painting primary color on the inside and secondary color on the outside. You will want to use the lighter shade to paint in the cabinets. Paint the outer side of the cabinets with the primary color you put on the doors if you are creating three-dimensional effects. Otherwise, paint the doors primary and the rest of the cabinets secondary.

You can put more than one border on the doors and alternate the colors, or use a third color as an accent. It would be best to take that accent color, whether bright, light or dark from the fabric you have chosen.

Have fun with your cabinets. There is a lot you can do with the doors to make them different and new. Updating the look doesn't need to be expensive, it just takes some paint, some time and your imagination.

Other ideas for your cabinets are:

* Trompe l'oeil, where you paint to fool the eye into thinking things are what they are not using shadow and shading.

* Cutting out the center of your cabinets and replacing it with glass, frosted glass or stained glass. (Glass can be purchased and cut to your specific size at a hardware store or glass store.)

* Don't forget the knobs on your cabinet if you have them. You can either clean the ones you have and shine them up or purchase new ones. Knobs are an inexpensive addition or change to your cabinets that can really change the entire decor.

Additional hints:

If you are handy with a sewing machine, you can easily make curtains and a tablecloth to match your decor. A tablecloth is a simple square, rectangle or circle that fits your table. Curtains can be as simple as a square with a loop hem at the top to slide over a curtain rod.

You shouldn't neglect the walls in your kitchen either. Choose your color from your fabric wisely. You probably don't want to choose a color the same as what you used on your cabinets, or they will blend into the décor too much. Choose an accenting color - for example, if your cabinets are blue, choose a light yellow for your walls. The contrast, as long as it's not too drastic (primary blue and primary yellow would be a very "loud" kitchen), will be very pleasing to the eye.



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CL for

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Registered: 09-05-2003
Thu, 03-13-2008 - 9:57am

from http://www.doityourself.com/stry/refacingcabinets

Advantages and Drawbacks of Cabinet Refacing

By Paul Bianchina

If you're thinking about remodeling your kitchen but are daunted by the cost of new cabinets, all is not lost. Cabinet re-facing may offer an alternative worth exploring. Keep in mind, however, re-facing is not for everyone, and there are some definite advantages and disadvantages to the process that you need to consider.

Re-facing is simply the process of covering the old exteriors of the cabinets with new wood to give them a fresh, clean look, and it can make a good do-it-yourself project for the patient carpenter. Your existing cabinets need to be in good condition structurally and you need to be happy with their size and layout. If so, then re-facing them may offer a faster, lower-cost option to complete replacement, which also allows you to save the countertops.

The re-facing process is fairly straightforward, although it sounds a little easier than it is. First, all of the drawers are removed from the cabinets and set aside. Then the doors are removed and discarded. Any crown or scribe molding is also removed and discarded. All of this can theoretically be done with the contents still in the cabinets, but it's definitely easier and cleaner to box up the contents and store them temporarily. Prior to starting on the re-facing, the door openings are measured and new doors are ordered.

Next, the faces of the old cabinets have to be cleaned and prepared for the new wood veneer. Washing the cabinets with a degreasing cleaner, such as TSP, removes built-up dirt and grease layers that will clog the sandpaper. The wood is then checked for areas that are chipped, gouged or otherwise damaged, and those spots are repaired with wood putty.

Next, the cabinets are lightly sanded with 120- or 150-grit sandpaper to rough up the surfaces. This sanding is fairly light, and it's important not to use a power sander that would remove too much material or round over square edges. Finally, the surfaces are lightly cleaned again with soap and water and allowed to dry thoroughly.

With all the prep work done, the cabinets are ready for re-facing. The end panels of the cabinets are done first, typically with sheets of 1/8-inch plywood, or with plastic laminate. The panels are cut to the proper size, and then adhered to the cabinets with wood glue or contact cement. All of the end panels need to be completed prior to working on the face frames.

The face frames are typically covered with a paper-thin self-adhesive wood or laminate veneer. The fastest method is to cover the entire cabinet face with a sheet of veneer, and then use a trim router to cut out the door openings. However, this method results in a lot of wasted material, and even more importantly, it leaves the grain of the wood all running in the same direction, which can look odd.

The preferred method is to install narrow strips of veneer similar to the individual pieces of wood that were used to make up the cabinet face frames originally. Using a straightedge, the veneer is cut into strips of the proper width and length, then adhered to the cabinet faces one piece at a time. For the best look, the interior edges of the face frame should also be faced, or at least completely sanded and refinished. After all the face frames are done, new moldings are added as needed, and the cabinets are stained and lacquered.

The doors and drawers are the final step in the process. If the drawers are in good shape, the faces are removed and new solid wood faces are installed. If the operation of the drawers was a problem, the drawer hardware may also be replaced at this time so that they roll more smoothly. The new doors ordered earlier are then installed, typically with new hinges.

The Disadvantages

An important distinction to remember with cabinet re-facing is that the changes are cosmetic, not structural. For example, have you ever wished that the refrigerator was on a different wall, or that you had a big bank of drawers next to the range? When re-facing cabinets, instead of replacing them, you can't rearrange their layout, and for many that's the primary disadvantage of this method of remodeling. It also will not take care of other structural problems, such as loose joints or broken wood.

Another disadvantage is the cabinet interiors. While re-facing definitely cleans up the exterior of the cabinets, it doesn't do anything for the interiors. You can replace the shelves, but every time you open the brand new doors, you'll still be facing the old interior. You do have the option of re-facing the interiors as well, but all that extra labor and material quickly eat up the money you saved by re-facing rather than replacing your cabinets.

Copyright 2005-2006 Inman News.



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Registered: 09-05-2003
Fri, 03-14-2008 - 11:34am

from http://www.doityourself.com/stry/paintkitchencabinets

How to Paint Kitchen Cabinets
By Brian Simkins
© 2006 Doityourself.com

1. Clean the cabinets. Make sure that all of the surfaces you are going to paint are completely free of all grease, grime, food residue and whatever else may be stuck to them. You will find the entire process is much easier if you remove all the cabinet doors. Once you have taken them all down, find a place where you can lay them out flat. Use an all purpose cleaner and a rag and then allow them to dry thoroughly.

2. Sand the cabinets. Once they are dry, use a piece of fine grit sandpaper - 150 or finer - and make a few passes over all the flat surfaces of the doors. Don't forget to do the thin facing pieces on the cabinet boxes themselves. The slightly sanded surface will allow the primer to bite and hold onto the cabinet surface.

3. Apply primer. After sanding, it's time to prime the cabinets. Primer forms a better bond with the surface than paint alone would. This means that the paint is less likely to chip and peel if it gets bumped with dishes or pots and pans. If your cabinets are already painted and you are re-painting them the same color, it is OK to skip this step and go ahead and apply the paint. If, however, your cabinets are stained and you are trying to cover up the natural wood grain with paint, you must prime them first. The paint will not stick to the varnished surface and the color of the stain will most likely bleed right through your paint.

There are several types of primer that you can use, and which one you choose is largely based on what kind of paint you want to use over the top. If you are using an oil-based paint, an interior oil based primer is recommended. These products tend to have a very strong odor and they are best used when you can properly ventilate the room. The best option would be to take all the doors that you removed out to the garage and paint them there with the overhead door open.

If you are planning to use a latex paint for your top coat, then a shellac based primer is recommended. This product tends to dry fairly quickly, so make sure that you are ready to go before you begin applying it. The shellac based primers, just like the oil based, carry a very strong odor and caution should be used.

4. Paint the cabinets. There are several ways to apply the paint. A pneumatic sprayer is the best way to get a smooth and glossy finish. If you don't have access to one, however, you can still get a great finish by using a high quality paint brush. 2 1/2" to 3" would be ideal.

The key to achieving a professional finish with a brush is to use very thin coats. It may be tempting, after all the work you've already to done, to try to coat the paint on as thick as possible just so you can be finished. This is not a good idea. The best and most durable paint jobs are built up by consecutive thin layers of paint, not just one thick one.

5. Add additional coats. Lightly apply your first coat and let it dry completely. If you really want to achieve a professional finish, take some 400 grit sandpaper and very lightly sand the flat surfaces again. You are not trying to remove the paint, but instead are insuring that the next coat has the smoothest possible surface to adhere to. Once that is complete, add your second coat.

In most cases two coats of paint will be sufficient. Occasionally, though, you may find that you get better results from three. This is often true with woods that carry a heavier grain, like oak. Once the doors are painted and fully dry, simply hang them back up, sit back, and enjoy.



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CL for

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Registered: 09-05-2003
Sun, 03-16-2008 - 11:07am

MDF Cabinet Interiors...

from http://www.doityourself.com/stry/stainingcabinets

MDF, or medium density fiberboard, is a manufactured wood product consisting of sawdust bonded together at high heat and pressure by resins.

Because it can be tooled and milled easily and cleanly, and because it does not expand and contract with moisture changes, it is the material of choice for medium-grade cabinetry. Another advantage of MDF is that it takes paint and other finishes uniformly.

Staining and sealing your cabinet interiors is a three-step process.

Lightly sand the surfaces to be stained. Make sure you remove all the sanding dust with a vacuum cleaner and a tack cloth. Next, apply the stain. After the stain dries, sand lightly with No. 220 grit sandpaper and remove the dust. Next, apply a coat of wood sealer. Let dry and sand again. Finally, apply two coats of polyurethane, sanding between coats.

Painting MDF Cabinet interiors: Apply one coat of primer and two finish coats of a high-quality enamel. Again, make sure to sand and vacuum between coats.

Whether you choose stain and sealer or paint, you're in for a lot of work. The good news is that both finishes are durable and washable up to a point.



Co-CL for "The Stitcher's Niche" and "Remodel & Renovate" and CL for "Antiques and Collectibles"








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Stitchery WIPs: "Bath 5¢", "Walking to Town", a selection of 8 San Man snowman charts, "Millenium Sampler", 2 sets of curtain tie-backs using a DMC freebie chart and the DMC linen threads, a Kooler Design Studio chart form JanLynn called "Needlework Shop", "Tsunami Charity Sampler" from the fall 2007 Sampler & Needlework Quarterly, and "Autumn Leaves" from the December 2006 New Stitches



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Registered: 09-05-2003
Thu, 03-20-2008 - 1:07am

Refacing kitchen cabinets can be a less expensive alternative to a complete kitchen remodel. The articles in this section give you some ideas and techniques for refacing, refinishing, staining and painting your kitchen cabinets for an updated look.

• Cabinet Refacing 1 - Planning and Preparation:
http://www.doityourself.com/stry/refacingcabinets1

• Cabinet Refacing 2 - Tools and Supplies:
http://www.doityourself.com/stry/refacingcabinets2

• Cabinet Refacing 3 - Cabinet Boxes and Hardware:
http://www.doityourself.com/stry/refacingcabinets3



Co-CL for "The Stitcher's Niche" and "Remodel & Renovate" and CL for "Antiques and Collectibles"








Visit me at That Yank In...
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Avatar made with Portrait Illustrator Maker


Stitchery WIPs: "Bath 5¢", "Walking to Town", a selection of 8 San Man snowman charts, 2 sets of curtain tie-backs using a DMC freebie chart and the DMC linen threads, a Kooler Design Studio chart form JanLynn called "Needlework Shop", "Tsunami Charity Sampler" from the fall 2007 Sampler & Needlework Quarterly, and "Autumn Leaves" from the December 2006 New Stitches



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Registered: 09-05-2003
Thu, 03-20-2008 - 2:31pm

http://www.doityourself.com/stry/paintcabinets

Give Your Kitchen Cabinets a Fresh New Look with Paint

Painting your kitchen cabinets is one of the least expensive ways to update the look of your kitchen-and, it's not as difficult as you may think. Here are some tips from the experts at Zinsser that can make kitchen cabinet painting quick and easy:

* First, remove all doors, drawers, handles and hardware.

* Wipe all surfaces with a clean rag saturated with mineral spirits (paint thinner) to remove any surface contamination. You may need to do this twice if there is a heavy buildup of dirt, grease or grime. Change rags frequently to avoid depositing dirt and grease back onto the cabinets.

* Wash the surface with equal parts of household ammonia and water and rinse well with clean water. Allow the clean surface to dry completely.

* Prime the clean, dry surfaces with a shellac-base primer-sealer. Unlike finish paints, shellac-base primer-sealers, such as Zinsser's B-I-N, will adhere to all cabinet surfaces-painted, polyurethaned, unfinished, Formica, plastic, metal and glass-to form a sound base for the topcoat. B-I-N will seal porous surfaces, like new wood, and seal off knots and sappy streaks in knotty pine so they won't bleed through and ruin the paint job. Its bright white formula blocks out dark stains and colors. Perhaps best of all, there is no need to sand the surface when you use B-I-N, thus eliminating the dust and messy cleanup often associated with cabinet refinishing.

* Let the primer-sealer dry for about an hour. Then apply two coats of finish paint. Hint: If you tint the primer toward the color of your finish paint, you can eliminate the second finish coat. Consider choosing an oil-base finish paint over a water-base finish for a harder, more stain-resistant, washable and durable finish.

Want to give your cabinets a little added pizzazz? Try a faux finish, antique finish or stencil to create a unique and personalized look that is well worth the extra effort. Replacing cabinet hardware is another inexpensive way to give your freshly painted kitchen cabinets an extra-special look.



Co-CL for "The Stitcher's Niche" and "Remodel & Renovate" and CL for "Antiques and Collectibles"








Visit me at That Yank In...
and Traveling with That Yank




 





Avatar made with Portrait Illustrator Maker


Stitchery WIPs: "Bath 5¢", "Walking to Town", a selection of 8 San Man snowman charts, 2 sets of curtain tie-backs using a DMC freebie chart and the DMC linen threads, a Kooler Design Studio chart form JanLynn called "Needlework Shop", "Tsunami Charity Sampler" from the fall 2007 Sampler & Needlework Quarterly, and "Autumn Leaves" from the December 2006 New Stitches



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