Kitchen Sink Basics

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Kitchen Sink Basics
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Tue, 03-18-2008 - 10:20pm

http://www.kitchenbathideas.com/product/kitchenfaucets/sinkbasics_1.html?sssdmh=dm17.305321&esrc=nwkbi38

Kitchen Sink Basics

In deciding which sink is best for your kitchen, consider three factors: material, installation, and configuration.

Material

The most common materials all have pros and cons:

• Cast iron lessens noise and vibration and holds water heat longer, but it is extremely heavy, and its enamel coating can scratch and discolor over time.

• Composite materials, such as quartz or granite mixed with a resin base, are easy to care for, but they can be expensive, and their long-term durability has yet to be determined. 

• Fireclay’s glazed surface resists scratches and abrasions and won’t rust or fade, but the material can stain.

• Vitreous china is hard and nonporous with a glasslike shine, but it’s hard to mold into large shapes, so options for bowl designs may be limited.

• Solid-surfacing is easy to care for and available in a wide range of colors and patterns. The chief drawback is cost.

• Stainless steel resists corrosion and is available in a number of finishes, but it is susceptible to scratches, and thinner grades can be noisy.

Installation

• Self-rimming: In this, the easiest and most common installation method, the rim of the sink sits on the counter and the bowl is dropped through. The biggest problem is that the edge of the raised sink traps food particles.

• Tile-in: This is an option only with ceramic-tile countertops. The tiles go right up to the edge of the sink and there is no—or very little—step-down or step-up. 

• Undermount: In this installation, the edge of the sink rests underneath the counter, creating a sleek look and allowing scraps to be brushed right into the sink without a rim getting in the way. 

• Integral: With an integral sink, the sink and countertop are all one piece. Integral sinks were once made only with solid-surfacing. Some manufacturers now offer them with stainless steel. Natural stone also is available but very expensive.

Configuration

• A single basin works well in a small kitchen or as a secondary prep sink.

• The double-basin sink has long been the standard. Configurations with one large and one small bowl—or one deep bowl and one shallow bowl—are now common.
 
• The three-basin sink is great—if you have the space. Two large basins often flank one small, shallow bowl. Sink manufacturers usually offer accessories, such as colanders and cutting boards, that fit into the shallow basin.



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Registered: 09-05-2003
Fri, 03-21-2008 - 1:01pm

http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=howTo&p=BuyGuide/KitchenSinkBG.html

The sink might not be the first thing that comes to mind when it's time for a kitchen renovation, but it's a vital part of any upgrade. When you're sorting through the myriad of options available in cabinetry and appliances, the sink might seem like an afterthought. But if you're going to the effort and expense to remodel, don't overlook the one thing in the kitchen you'll probably use the most.

Things to consider when choosing a sink for the kitchen include material, shape and color, as well as how the sink will be mounted. The material and color of the sink often are coordinated with or determined by the countertops, although it's not a requirement that they be exactly the same. Make your choice of sink shape based on the way you use your kitchen and the most common tasks you perform. Finally, mounting style usually will be determined by the material of the countertops

The most common sink materials available today are stainless steel, porcelain, acrylic and solid-surface materials (also called composites). Each material has its own particular benefits, so you'll have to think about which qualities are most important to you.

A stainless steel sink is easy to clean and install.Stainless steel sinks — probably the most common — are easy to clean and install and come in a wide price range. But stainless steel can scratch easily and intensify the sound of running water and the garbage disposal, and it can dent if a very heavy object (such as a cast-iron pot) is dropped on it. If you choose stainless steel, ask about the gauge, or thickness of the material, for the model you are considering. A lower gauge number indicates thicker material, which should be sturdier and quieter. Also, look for an undercoating that further muffles sound.

Porcelain sinks usually feature a porcelain coating over a base of cast iron or other metal. They are common in older homes. Porcelain sinks can be buffed to a shine, but they can chip if you drop heavy items the wrong way, and some stains can be hard to remove.

Acrylic is another common material for sinks. It resists stains, and some models actually come with germ-fighting properties "built in" to the material. Acrylic sinks aren't as resistant to heat as other materials, though.

Solid-surface materials, which have become wildly popular in recent years, are available in a variety of colors to coordinate with countertops. They also can mimic granite and other high-end stones. The material is not completely scratch-proof, but most scratches buff out easily. In addition, it is heat- and stain-resistant.

Shape

Double-bowl sinks are common these days, but many renovated kitchens now feature sinks with three bowls: often two large ones for everyday use and a smaller one for the garbage disposal. The third bowl doesn't have to be in the middle; some models place it in the corner or on the side, making the main bowls easier to reach.

A deep sink with a high-arc faucet makes cleaning big pots easier. A small sink on a wet bar makes a trip to the kitchen unnecessary.

Another popular option is an extra-deep bowl on one or both sides - perfect for washing large pots or giving a baby a bath. A high-arc faucet that swings out of the way gives you even more space in the area.

Specially shaped sinks are available for corner placement, and small models are perfect for use on wet bars or side counters in the kitchen. Some homeowners choose a small sink with a built-in filter for drinking and cooking water, and a separate, larger one for cleaning and other everyday uses.

Mounting Styles

Sinks can be attached above the countertop (top-mounted), below it (under-mounted), or level with it (flush-mounted).

A top-mounted sink has a lip that rests on the surface of the countertop.Top-mounted sinks (also called over-mounted, self-rimming or drop-in) have a lip that rests on the surface of the countertop, and they are usually held in place by clips and screws. They are easier and faster to install than under-mounted sinks, but the raised lip that sits between the counter surface and the sink makes it more difficult to clean up spills and crumbs. Stainless-steel sinks are often installed this way.

Top-mounted sinks are used with laminate countertops, because the lip can mask the seam where two parts of the laminate are joined.

An under-mounted sink sits blow the surface of the countertop.Under-mounted sinks (also called sub-mounted) are usually more difficult and time-consuming to install, but they offer a more integrated look, particularly when the sink and countertop are made of the same material. There is no barrier between countertop and sink, so cleaning up is easier. In many cases, grooves can be routed in the countertop near the sink, creating a built-in drain board.

Under-mounting is used most often with stone or solid-surface countertops. Because the edge of the countertop is exposed, it cannot be used with laminate countertops.

Flush-mounted sinks sit even with the countertop. The same look can be achieved with an integrated sink — a countertop and sink unit all in one piece.

Other Considerations

Farmhouse sinks (also called apron sinks) feature an exposed front that sometimes juts past the front of the cabinetry that surrounds it. They are commonly used in kitchens with a rustic or country-style décor, and the sinks themselves often are deeper than average. Farmhouse sinks can be integrated with furniture pieces that serve to replace the traditional cabinet sink base, creating a custom look for the kitchen. They often have no deck, so the faucet and other accessories are mounted directly into the countertop behind the bowl.

When you buy a new sink, you must decide how many holes you will need in the "deck" - the flat part behind the bowls. Depending on the style of faucet you choose, you will need one to three holes to accommodate the taps and spigot. More holes will be needed for a hot-water dispenser, a spray accessory (if it's not integrated into the faucet) or a built-in soap dispenser. It's difficult, if not impossible, to add holes once the sink is in place, so get as many as you think you'll ever need. Special accessories are available to camouflage un-used holes.

A sink with the drain hole placed farther back than the usual center position frees up space underneath by pushing the pipes closer to the back of the cabinet. Look for this feature if you need to keep garbage or recycling containers under the sink.



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Sat, 03-22-2008 - 1:12pm

http://www.renovatorsplace.com/dsp_articles.cfm?l_article_id=385

The Pros and Cons of Stainless Steel Kitchen Sinks
By Allison E. Beatty
Renovators Place Columnist

Stainless steel kitchen sinks have become a hot commodity in recent years. The sleek, shiny metal is durable and blends well with commercial style appliances and granite countertops. When looking at stainless steel kitchen sinks, here's what to consider.

Stainless steel kitchen sinks are popular because they are:

Easy to clean.
Sleek and attractive--a cool toned metal that adds a nice contrast against granite countertops.
Durable-- stainless steel sink will last for many years.
Forgiving--if you drop a glass in a stainless steel sink it shouldn't break.

Stainless Steel Sinks Blend With Everything

Stainless steel kitchen sinks are such a hot item because they go with everything. They blend well with current trends in using stainless steel appliances. They also blend with white or black appliances, depending on your kitchen design. Stainless steel sinks also create an interesting contrast in textures when paired with a granite countertop.

Stainless Steel Sinks are Priced for Everyone

Stainless steel kitchen sinks are priced from $50 to $700 or more, making it easy to find a sink that fits your kitchen design and budget. The price will vary based on the size, thickness, and design of the sink. The lower the gauge of steel, for example, the thicker the steel. Here's how the costs vary:
18-gauge stainless steel sinks--$200 to $1,000 or more.
20-gauge stainless steel sinks--$100 to $300.
22-gauge stainless steel sinks--$50 to $125.

Expect Scratches with Stainless Steel

The main disadvantage of stainless steel is its tendency to develop scratches. When buying a stainless steel kitchen sink, you should assume it will scratch over time. Consider this part of the sink's "well-worn character."

Noise Level is an Issue With Stainless Steel Sinks

Stainless steel kitchen sinks also can be noisy, depending on the thickness of the sink and how it is used. If you toss heavy pots and pans in the sink, expect a little banging noise here and there. Many manufacturers add sound-deadening pads or coatings to help reduce noise.

Stainless Steel Sink Color is Not for Everyone

Another disadvantage to stainless steel sinks is the color. If you want a bold color to spruce up your countertop, then stainless steel is not the answer. The same holds true for those who want a warm cream to blend with the tones in a granite countertop or a white sink to go with white appliances.



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Tue, 05-06-2008 - 9:19am

from http://www.kitchen-cabinets-tips.com/sinks.html

From the traditional old-style kitchen sinks to the modern integrated once, the range to chose from is enormous. Modern kitchens are made out of huge variety of materials. These materials permit new shapes and forms which make it easier for sinks to be integrated into the kitchen design.

In former times they where inserted into a hole of the kitchen worktop and fixed from underneath. Over the recent years undermounted sinks have become more and more popular as the integrate more beautiful into the overall design.

Different shapes

Before going into more detail lets have a look on the different forms that can be found. Generally various shapes can be distinguished:

Single bowl kitchen sink, available left or right.
Double bowl sinks where they can be identical or different of size.
Triple bowl sink with extra space to store the sponge. Ideal for large faucets.

Huge variety of different materials used

The most traditional kind of sink is made out of stainless steel. Followed by Porcelain and the more modern once made out of DuPont® corian. Especially DuPont® corian kitchen sinks permit the designer utmost flexibility. With this newer materials it is quite combine to combine them and the counter and make it out of one entire peace. Thereby the DuPont® corian sink is glued underneath the kitchen top which is made of the same material. With a precise cut out using diamond coated router bits, the surface of the kitchen counter and the sinkbowl are smoothly finished. As a result the joint between the counter and the sink can hardly be seen.

Improved cabinets for new sinks

With the recent development in new types of kitchen cabinet drawers the space underneath a sink can be used more efficiently. Amongst others Blum offers a new kind of U-shaped drawer which makes perfect use of the space underneath the kitchen sinks (Photo:Blum). The concept is very easy and perfect especially to store dishwashing accessories or cleaning agents etc. Gone are the times where the space of a kitchen cabinet had to be covered by a taller door or an additional cover panel.

To sum it up, when it comes to sinks every designer should have a close and detailed look. Make sure you are aware of the different shapes and the possibilities they offer. Together with adequate faucets, the cabinet underneath they can be used for additional storage. If done well sinks can become an beautiful center point of a kitchen.



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Wed, 05-14-2008 - 12:34pm
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Registered: 09-05-2003
Sat, 05-17-2008 - 10:12am

http://kitchenrenovations.net/kitchen-sinks.html

Kitchen Sinks

The kitchen sink is probably the most used piece of equipment in the entire kitchen. It must be durable, but it can still be stylish and beautiful. There are many available styles and it should be little trouble to find one that matches seamlessly with the rest of the decor in your kitchen. There are a couple of things that you will need to take into consideration, namely, whether or not you would like to make your kitchen sink a focal point or rather jast have it blend in with the rest of the kitchen? You will also need to consider if what type of material will meet both your aesthetic and practical needs.

To begin, you will want to consider your family size and how often you use the kitchen. If you or your family are in the kitchen quite a bit, preparing meals or entertaining, you may want to consider purchasing a kitchen sink that is very large and durable. A double-sided, or even a sink with three bowls might work best. On the other hand, i f you would rather eat out then spend one more minute than is absolutely necessary in the kitchen, or if you have a small family, you have the option of choosing something that is more trendy, stylish, and less durable. A single bowl sink might work just fine.

Another decision that must be made when choosing the right kitchen sink is whether or not you would like a standard sized (shallow) sink or a deep one. A shallow sink is seven inches deep and works well for individuals who do not cook much. However, for those who do enjoy being in the kitchen, a deep sink is recommended. A deep sink is 10 inches deep and allows you to hold more dishes and prepare bigger foods such as turkey and chicken.

When you are designing your new kitchen, remember the "sink rule". Sinks are generally laid out to have thirty-six inches of counter area on one side and about half of that or eighteen inches on the other side. Consider this when you are renovating your kitchen.

Lastly, you should consider the type of material you want your sink made out of. Stainless steel, enameled steel and cast iron are the most common ones. However, you can also choose fire clay, slate, soapstone, brass and copper amongst others.

Choosing the right kitchen sink is vital in regards to durability and beautification. There are many types and styles to choose from. It should not be difficult finding the perfect one. You can visit local stores or save the physical trip and search virtually. With the many available options, you should be able to find the perfect kitchen sink in no time.



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Tue, 05-27-2008 - 10:25am

from http://www.kitchenthoughts.com/ideas/sinksunk.php

Has Your Kitchen Sink Sunk?

No, not literally sunk. Not unless your countertops have some serious issues. But its appearance may make your kitchen look terrible.

A kitchen sink can sound pretty easy to choose, but there are a lot of little details that can make it more difficult than you might expect. Materials, size, number of basins, these are factors that will suddenly become very important when you start looking around.

You may be surprised by the features you will turn out to like. It may not be what you've always had.

Simply replacing a sink is not easy. The range of sizes is amazing, so limiting yourself to the size of the current hole may make putting the new one in much simpler but will greatly complicate your shopping.

On the other hand, if it's a serious kitchen remodel and you're replacing the countertops you have a lot of freedom. You can pick any sink that appeals to you.

Most kitchen sinks are stainless steel. It's a nice, practical material, but it's not the only choice out there. You can pick a color that goes well with your kitchen overall. Depending on your taste, that may well be the classic stainless steel sink. Stainless steel kitchens are very popular, and obviously most people wouldn't want anything other than a stainless steel sink in a stainless steel kitchen.

On the other hand, a darker sink may go well with some kinds of countertops. Consider a kitchen with granite countertops that looks beautiful with a matte black sink. The darkness really adds to the appearance, and of course is quite functional too.

The right kitchen sink is one of many factors that finishes off a really great looking kitchen. Take your time choosing the right one and don't just slap in the cheapest one you can find. You'll be living with your choice for many years.



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Tue, 06-10-2008 - 4:15pm
Buying a Kitchen Sink

Sinks are available in an incredible array of materials, colors, and sizes, with all kinds of installation options and features. Don’t get overwhelmed—your dream sink IS out there!



Which sink is best for your kitchen?

Do you need a second sink?

Shop for the exact kitchen sink you want



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Thu, 10-30-2008 - 9:13am






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