Choosing an oven...

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Registered: 09-05-2003
Choosing an oven...
5
Mon, 03-24-2008 - 9:42am

How To Buy An Oven

http://www0.epinions.com/hmgd-review-3AAC-5F215E0-38F7605A-prod1

First, know what size you need to replace the old oven, and if you require gas or electric. If you are putting in a new product that does not need to take any old one into consideration, you still need to know some specifics, and then make your choices.

Will the new oven need to go under a counter, as some 30" ovens are built to do? Will you be looking for a single or a double oven? Are you aware that electric ovens are preferred by most chefs, as they tend to keep the temperature more 'on cue'? Remember, the 24" oven is almost gone, now. It is very difficult to replace, and if you have the choice of size, do be smart: choose the 27" or the 30" oven. Do you want it to be manual clean (where you buy a can of oven cleaner and clean it yourself) or do you want it to be self clean (you put the dial on 'clean' and it heats to a temperature that will clean the oven for you)? How often do you broil? This is an important question, as many oven manufacturers are placing a lot of emphasis on how fast their broilers do the job. Many broilers do the job in 1/3 the time as regular broilers. (Keep the broiling in mind when you decide on manual or self clean!)

Have you considered a convection oven? These cook most evenly of all the ovens and are really easy to use. The convection ovens keep every inch of the oven at exactly the same temperature during the cooking. That means, for example, that if you are cooking three racks of cookies, you don't need to bother with switching the cookie trays half way through the baking. Imagine how well that works with roasts, turkeys, etc..If you look into the back of the oven, you can see the fan that keeps the temperature so even. Most convection ovens are set up so that you can use the convection cycle or the regular bake cycle.

Decide how much you are willing to pay before you start shopping. Decide what color you want and AGAIN. . .remember, Almond is the color that manufacturers have either stopped making or are planning to stop manufacturing. You don't want to spend your money on a color that you cannot match up, later!



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Registered: 09-05-2003
Thu, 03-27-2008 - 9:17am

from http://www.happynews.com/living/kitchen/advice-reviews-choosing.htm

Are you looking for the perfect wall oven to complete your kitchen? Here are a few of the answers you may seek.

By Misty Rodriguez

Are you looking for the perfect wall oven to complete your kitchen? You may find yourself confused by all of the options and features. What is a convection oven? Why buy a double wall oven? These may be questions that you find yourself with when comparing wall ovens. Here are a few of the answers you may seek.

First, some of the usual features, common among wall ovens which should be included in the original price. These features include electronic controls, child locks, and self cleaning features. Check out your wall oven and make sure that at the very least these features are included, as they are standard to many wall ovens.

Some features may cost you extra. These features may include color (including black white and stainless steel), different timers, auto shut off, storage drawers, and a built in meat probe. Stainless steel looks nice, but you are going to pay for this feature. It may cost as much as $250 extra to add this option to your wall oven. The built in meat probe is just a meat thermometer which will allow you to be certain that the middle has cooked thoroughly.

You can also buy a single or double wall oven. Obviously the beauty of a double wall oven is the ability to make multiple dishes at one time. You can also buy the wall oven in electric or gas. Or you might select a convection oven. A convection oven has a fan that circulates the hot air throughout the inside of the oven. This speeds up baking and roasting times considerably. The only draw back is that the inside of the oven may be a bit more cramped as the fan takes up some of the inside room. Some convection ovens come with a recipe conversion feature that translates the cooking time from that of an original thermal oven, to a convection oven.

Some more variables you can expect include amount of oven racks, window size, and inside space. Many ovens come in white, black, or the stainless steel. .

Prices vary according to which options you choose; however, some brands are naturally cheaper than others. For a single wall oven you can expect to pay between $800 and $1500 for an electric oven. The price lowers about $100 dollars for a gas oven. Some of the manufacturers carrying lower prices include Kenmore and GE. Maytag and Frigidaire are towards the middle, while Thermador and Dacor are at the top of the curve. You can expect to pay a lot more for a double oven, going up to $4,000 dollars and more.

Now that you are armed with some information, you are ready to choose which wall oven is right for you. Whether you want all the options including the stainless steel feature, or just the basic thermal wall oven, you at least have the knowledge to know what you are getting and what you are passing up.



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Stitchery WIPs: "Bath 5¢", "Walking to Town", a selection of 8 San Man snowman charts, 2 sets of curtain tie-backs using a DMC freebie chart and the DMC linen threads, a Kooler Design Studio chart form JanLynn called "Needlework Shop", "Tsunami Charity Sampler" from the fall 2007 Sampler & Needlework Quarterly, and "Autumn Leaves" from the December 2006 New Stitches



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Sun, 03-30-2008 - 9:58am

from http://home.howstuffworks.com/how-to-choose-kitchen-appliances1.htm

How to Choose an Oven
The traditional range or stove, a single unit with cooktop above and oven below, is an affordable, space-conserving solution still chosen by most homeowners. But it's just one of the cooking options offered today.

Some serious home cooks choose commercial-style stoves with six or eight burners instead of four, basting and grilling functions, and built-in warming ovens. (Real commercial stoves pose special challenges, such as special ventilation systems and noncombustible walls and floors, when used in the home, so commercial-style may be easier to live with.) Other people love the new modular cooktops that let you add burners, downdrafts, griddles, deep-fry and steamer units, woks, rotisseries, and grills. And these are just a few examples of what's available!

A modular approach to overall kitchen design is a pronounced trend. Wall ovens separate from cooktops let you create several cooking work stations instead of just one. A double wall oven stacks two ovens to save space and deliver twice the baking/roasting capacity, which many people find useful for special occasions. And you can still get two-oven stoves, with one oven below the cooking surface and the other well above, at cabinet height.

The first decision in range shopping has always been gas versus electric. Many serious cooks prefer gas for its instant response, precise controllability, and lower operating cost over time. Others praise the evenness of electric heat and the lower initial cost of the appliance.

While many people like to blend refrigerators and dishwashers into the cabinetry with matching fronts, the latest trend is to keep ranges visible. However, if you do want to de-emphasize your oven, the easiest way is with an under-counter model. (Make sure the oven you choose is designed for under-counter use, because not all are.) You may install a cooktop directly above the oven or locate it elsewhere in the kitchen. A cooktop directly over an under-counter oven functions much the same as a conventional range, but, with no range backsplash and with the control knobs located on the countertop, the result is a more integrated look.



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Stitchery WIPs: "Bath 5¢", "Walking to Town", a selection of 8 San Man snowman charts, 2 sets of curtain tie-backs using a DMC freebie chart and the DMC linen threads, a Kooler Design Studio chart form JanLynn called "Needlework Shop", "Tsunami Charity Sampler" from the fall 2007 Sampler & Needlework Quarterly, and "Autumn Leaves" from the December 2006 New Stitches



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Registered: 09-05-2003
Sun, 02-08-2009 - 10:22am

In selecting a built in oven, one must not only look at the color and look of the oven but also at its baking features.

http://www.raftertales.com/home-improvement/home-appliances/selecting-a-built-in-oven/



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Mon, 05-04-2009 - 10:50am



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