Colorful Kitchens

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-05-2003
Colorful Kitchens
2
Tue, 05-20-2008 - 1:52pm

Three slide shows:

• Red kitchens:
http://www.kitchenbathideas.com/gallery/kitchen/color/red_ss1.html?sssdmh=dm17.316056&esrc=nwkbi47

• Blue kitchens:
http://www.kitchenbathideas.com/gallery/kitchen/color/blue_ss1.html?sssdmh=dm17.316056&esrc=nwkbi47

• Yellow kitchens:
http://www.kitchenbathideas.com/gallery/kitchen/color/yellow_ss1.html?sssdmh=dm17.316056&esrc=nwkbi47



Co-CL for "The Stitcher's Niche" and CL for "Remodel & Renovate"




Visit me at That Yank In... and Traveling with That Yank


Avatar made with Portrait Illustrator Maker



Stitchery WIPs: "Bath 5¢", "Walking to Town", a selection of 8 San Man snowman charts, 2 sets of curtain tie-backs using a DMC freebie chart and the DMC linen threads, a Kooler Design Studio chart form JanLynn called "Needlework Shop", "Tsunami Charity Sampler" from the fall 2007 Sampler & Needlework Quarterly, and "Autumn Leaves" from the December 2006 New Stitches



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iVillage Member
Registered: 09-05-2003
Wed, 05-28-2008 - 8:58am

from http://www.kitchenbathideas.com/howdoi/choosetherightcolors_1.html
http://www.kitchenbathideas.com/howdoi/choosetherightcolors_2.html
http://www.kitchenbathideas.com/howdoi/choosetherightcolors_3.html
http://www.kitchenbathideas.com/howdoi/choosetherightcolors_4.html
http://www.kitchenbathideas.com/howdoi/choosetherightcolors_5.html

Choose the Right Colors

Color inspiration can come from anywhere—nature, fabrics, art, books and magazines, kitchen and bath showrooms—but whatever the source, design pros have a caveat: Make sure the colors you choose are right for you and the room. Is your bath style a Zen space clad in naturals and neutrals, or a morning eye-opener with tropical yellow walls? Do you want a retro kitchen with indigo cabinets, tangerine walls, and an avocado ceiling, or one with the classic white cabinetry everyone loves?

Get Personal
“Color is all about personality,” says Melissa Smith, certified kitchen designer (CKD) and member of the National Kitchen & Bath Association (NKBA). “Some people may flourish in a calm, relaxing setting, and others may want stimulation. The most important thing is not to be intimidated. Pick colors you love, colors that make you feel good.”

The trick is translating those colors into a cohesive room scheme. It helps to remain flexible and ready to tweak and compromise, especially if you want real change. As with any change, there’s a certain amount of risk involved. “It’s sort of like voting for a politician,” interior designer Lou Ann Bauer says. “You can go with the same guy,” a known quantity who may not be ideal, she says. “Or you can vote for somebody who’s a little bit outspoken.” The latter is more interesting at first, she says, but long-term performance is uncertain.

In a kitchen (or a bath), Bauer says, don’t be afraid to amp up the color. “People are scared, so they go with white or alabaster or beige,” she says. “You could at least get it to maybe butterscotch or vanilla, something warmer.”
Bauer often uses what she calls “planes of color,” combining three or four different colors on accent walls in a space so that the colors butt together in corners and then flow through the whole house.

Find an Anchor

Whether it’s a cabinet door or a chunk of blue-gray granite, you can use one element to launch a palette. “If you’re absolutely in love with it, sure, why not?” says Lois Kennedy, certified kitchen designer (CKD) and member of the National Kitchen & Bath Association (NKBA). But hold off buying that element, if you can. “I try to get people to keep their options open until all the major components are put together—flooring, cabinets, countertop—then make the purchase,” Kennedy says. “Don’t jump the gun and buy something, and then discover you don’t like the options it presents.”

For that reason, it makes sense to start with the least-flexible color element and match others to it. For example, that blue-gray granite you love could be too contemporary for your traditional maple cabinetry. Because granite doesn’t come in a full spectrum of colors, it’s easier to adjust the wood finish to go with the countertop choice. “I can pretty much find a wood finish that will go with just about any granite, but I can’t find a granite that will go with just about any wood finish,” Kennedy says.

In another case, it might make more sense to choose the wood tone first. “If you’re putting ceramic tile on your floor, you can choose a wood finish, and you know you can go out and find 150 floor tiles that will look great with it,” Kennedy says. “That’s easy.”

Work the Room

Of course, samples of tile, stone, wood, and paint that seem to blend perfectly when spread out on a showroom table inevitably look different at home in varying natural and artificial lighting. “It’s a jigsaw puzzle,” Smith says. “What makes it work is the good lighting, the good paint, and all of those elements and colors blended together.”

Consulting with a designer can help you customize a room’s palette, open up new resources, and solve potential problems. For example, as your eyes age, colors don’t seem as bright. A pro’s eye can keep your changing vision from compromising your design vision. Or, if you have a flow-through kitchen—one open to a family room or great-room—you may need help coordinating the colors inside the kitchen with those beyond to avoid jarring or stopping the eye.

More than the size or shape of a room, the amount of natural light and the kind of artificial light used can impact color choices. For example, a bath in soft blues and greens may look great in morning light, but the colors can turn dull under incandescent light. “Daylight enhances lively colors, but the absence of daylight, in my opinion, calls for warmer, softer color schemes,” says Kennedy, who often recommends color-corrected fluorescent lighting. “There are blues that can go very cool and look great with white, or there are blues that can be a wonderful complement to warm, rustic pine. The most successful rooms do have that balance, that blending of the warm and the cool.”

Never pick countertop granite from a small sample, the pros advise. Instead, “Go to the granite yard and put your template on the slab,” Smith says. “It makes such a huge difference. You may have a beautiful vein that has some quartz in it, or you may have a dark area. It’s an extra step, but by placing it right where you want, it pays off.”

When choosing cabinets, treat wood like any other color. Paints, stains, and glazes can create limitless color options, and finishes can easily be tweaked to blend with other elements, making wood tones one of the most flexible parts of a color palette. “Wood tones don’t have to be brown,” Kennedy says. “They can be anything from blue to orange. They can be cool, misty, silvery gray. Even browns range from cool to warm.”

Shift to Neutral
 
For granite and other big-ticket items, the conservative approach is to go neutral. “Trendy colors can be risky,” says Kristin Okeley, certified kitchen designer (CKD) and member of the National Kitchen & Bath Association (NKBA). “So it’s important to combine those trendy colors with other more timeless colors to help create a balance between what the client may want now and how the space can be manipulated later to stay up-to-date.”
Appliances and plumbing fixtures are usually considered neutrals. “If we’re talking high-end kitchens, you’re going to use stainless steel or wood,” Smith says of appliance finishes. “You’re not going to use black or white unless it’s contemporary and you’re trying to make a statement with it. In baths, white is just clean and crisp. Even white looks great with tans and beiges and camel colors.”

Okeley calls stainless steel the “great neutralizer” in kitchens. Though Kennedy likes to panel appliances to match cabinetry when possible, she does like the reflective quality of stainless steel. “Stainless steel might look terrible with the wood, but you pick a granite that blends the two together,” she says. (For bath fixtures, her choice is bisque because it’s compatible with warm wood tones and tumbled stone.)
 

Make a Splash

Don’t underestimate the color power of a backsplash. In pairing backsplashes and countertops, “there are no rules,” she says. “That is a great place for color.” For example, if painting an entire kitchen wall your favorite shade of purple seems over the top, use purple accents in the backsplash instead.

Kennedy recommends selecting the countertop color before backsplash tile in kitchens, and vice versa in baths. “Tile is a wonderful starting point,” she says. “In fact, in a bathroom, tile is the place to start if you’re planning to do a significant amount of your walls in tile,” she says. “Go to a tile store and fall in love with a tile, and by all means, find something that’s fun and not boring.”

A good color scheme hits you right away, the pros say. “If you walk in and you’re not in love with it, the chances that it’s going to grow on you are slim,” Kennedy says. “I still walk into jobs that I’ve done in the past and they take my breath away. I hope that it’s love at first sight for my clients, as well. When they walk in, I want them to go, ‘I love it!’ and not, ‘Well, hopefully it will grow on me.’”

When in doubt, you can’t go wrong with timeless favorites, such as a white kitchen. “I don’t think the classics ever are going to go out of style,” Smith says. “Everybody loves white kitchens.



Co-CL for "The Stitcher's Niche" and CL for "Remodel & Renovate"




Visit me at That Yank In... and Traveling with That Yank


Avatar made with Portrait Illustrator Maker



Stitchery WIPs: "Bath 5¢", "Walking to Town", a selection of 8 San Man snowman charts, 2 sets of curtain tie-backs using a DMC freebie chart and the DMC linen threads, a Kooler Design Studio chart form JanLynn called "Needlework Shop", "Tsunami Charity Sampler" from the fall 2007 Sampler & Needlework Quarterly, and "Autumn Leaves" from the December 2006 New Stitches



CL for

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-05-2003
Thu, 05-29-2008 - 9:15am

from http://homedecor.iloveindia.com/room-decor/kitchen-decor/kitchen-colors.html

Creative use of colors can result in a budget-friendly kitchen décor that can stimulate your hunger and funk-up your surroundings. Here are some hit tips for you:

Painting the kitchen cabinet in most innovative ways can add splash of colors to the kitchen.

Installing new tiles in trendy designs and deep tones all over the kitchen or above the kitchen counters can make cleaning and wiping the area easier and make kitchen look quite beautiful too.

A monochromatic color scheme with matching cabinet, countertop and wall colors can be funked up by creating a focal point in the kitchen in bold contrasting colors and stenciled motifs.

Installing curtains that easily washable in decorative patterns and colors can also make your kitchen look much prettier.

Do not overlook the fact that colors look different in different lighting systems and fluorescent or incandescent lighting may affect the hue of your kitchen entirely in a different fashion.

These days, recessed and cabinet lighting plan in the kitchen rather than the uniform lighting plan.

You may add a dramatic touch to your kitchen décor by using light and shadows to compliment the kitchen colors and a spotlight above your cooking area and dining area may actually look like a studio kitchen.

Besides the cabinetry, ceiling, floor and window coverings, moldings and trim, there are other design elements too such as chandeliers and designer lights, knobs and pulls, hanging plates and pot racks.

Hand painted furnishings and accessories can also be used for the kitchen décor.



Co-CL for "The Stitcher's Niche" and CL for "Remodel & Renovate"




Visit me at That Yank In... and Traveling with That Yank


Avatar made with Portrait Illustrator Maker



Stitchery WIPs: "Bath 5¢", "Walking to Town", a selection of 8 San Man snowman charts, 2 sets of curtain tie-backs using a DMC freebie chart and the DMC linen threads, a Kooler Design Studio chart form JanLynn called "Needlework Shop", "Tsunami Charity Sampler" from the fall 2007 Sampler & Needlework Quarterly, and "Autumn Leaves" from the December 2006 New Stitches



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