The Work Triangle...

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-05-2003
The Work Triangle...
11
Thu, 05-22-2008 - 10:51am

Kitchen layouts from http://www.hometime.com/Howto/projects/kitchen/kitchen_1.htm

For the last few decades, most kitchen designs have been based on three standard layouts: the U-shaped kitchen, the L-shaped kitchen and the galley kitchen.

Those all make use of the classic work triangle concept that basically positions the three major kitchen components (refrigerator, stove and sink) in a triangular pattern.

That was determined to be the most efficient layout in the 1950's, after a research study on kitchen usage showed that most women:

• Stayed home during the day
• Worked alone in the kitchen
• Cooked most foods from scratch
• Needed storage space for about 400 items

Tracking Modern Trends

More recently, the National Kitchen and Bath Association (NKBA) co-sponsored recent research that recognized the changing use patterns in the kitchen. It found that most women now:

• Work outside the home
• Share the cooking
• Prepare very few foods from scratch
• Require storage space for 800 items

After this study, the NKBA wrote 31 guidelines to provide industry pros with minimum standards for kitchen efficiency, convenience, traffic spaces, distances between items, and countertop and cabinet space. You can find them at http://www.nkba.org/guidelines/kitchen.aspx

Multiple Work Centers

Designers now think in terms of multiple work centers or work stations within the kitchen in order to allow more than one person to work efficiently without getting in anyone else's way.

Work centers are a little less formal concept than a classic work triangle since you can basically create a station anytime decent counter space is provided next to a major appliance or sink.

Adding an island is one of the most common ways to program multiple work centers into a kitchen. It might block the clear paths of the classic work triangle, but an island creates 2-4 small work stations along its perimeter.

These stations can become major work centers if a second sink is added or the cooktop is pulled away from the wall and set into the island. Even without an island, you can create distinct work centers simply by separating the microwave oven and the cooktop/range.

For example, placing them on opposite sides of the sink—setting the microwave near the refrigerator/freezer—provides counter space for food preparation at each appliance.



Co-CL for "The Stitcher's Niche" and CL for "Remodel & Renovate"




Visit me at That Yank In... and Traveling with That Yank


Avatar made with Portrait Illustrator Maker



Stitchery WIPs: "Bath 5¢", "Walking to Town", a selection of 8 San Man snowman charts, 2 sets of curtain tie-backs using a DMC freebie chart and the DMC linen threads, a Kooler Design Studio chart form JanLynn called "Needlework Shop", "Tsunami Charity Sampler" from the fall 2007 Sampler & Needlework Quarterly, and "Autumn Leaves" from the December 2006 New Stitches



CL for

Pages

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-05-2003
Fri, 05-23-2008 - 11:19am

http://www.merillat.com/space/work-smarter/index.aspx

Creating a work triangle in your kitchen can cut down on excess movement by centering your work space. Why waste time running around the kitchen when you can be playing with your kids or taking some quality time for yourself?

Rules of thumb for the basic work triangle are as follows:
No one side of the triangle should be greater than nine feet or less than four feet.
The triangle should not be interrupted by traffic or cabinetry.
The perimeter of the triangle should measure no more than 26 feet and no less than 12 feet.

This page also has illustrations of typical work triangles in various kitchen styles: galley, peninsula, L-shaped and U-shaped!



Co-CL for "The Stitcher's Niche" and CL for "Remodel & Renovate"




Visit me at That Yank In... and Traveling with That Yank


Avatar made with Portrait Illustrator Maker



Stitchery WIPs: "Bath 5¢", "Walking to Town", a selection of 8 San Man snowman charts, 2 sets of curtain tie-backs using a DMC freebie chart and the DMC linen threads, a Kooler Design Studio chart form JanLynn called "Needlework Shop", "Tsunami Charity Sampler" from the fall 2007 Sampler & Needlework Quarterly, and "Autumn Leaves" from the December 2006 New Stitches



CL for

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-05-2003
Sat, 05-24-2008 - 11:58am

http://www.renovationexperts.com/kitchen-work-triangle.asp

Making the 'Kitchen Work Triangle' Work for you!
by Lisa VandenDool

Much thought goes into designing a kitchen. Your goal is to maximize the function, storage and design in your dream kitchen. However, factors like the size and shape of the actual room can limit your options. Considering the kitchen work triangle will help you create a design that works!

The concept for the kitchen work triangle was developed by the Small Homes Council of the School of Architecture at the University of Illinois in the 1950's. An invisible "work triangle" is created in the kitchen by the arrangement of the sink, stove and refrigerator. The placement of these three elements in relation to each other is intrinsically connected to designing an efficient kitchen.

All of the elements in the Triangle need to be close together to keep movement in the workspace to a minimum. Keeping the triangle tight also limits unwanted traffic from passing through your work space.

REFRIGERATOR

In planning out your kitchen work triangle try to determine the best place for your refrigerator.

If you are including side-by-side refrigerator in your kitchen design you will find it less awkward to order one where the fridge portion opens into the triangle.

SINK

Where possible it is ideal to position the kitchen sink under a window. This provides natural light and a view of the outside.

The sink is the center point of the cleanup station. Locating the dishwasher beside the sink will make cleanup easy.

COOKTOP

The stove or cooktop, the third component of the work triangle, is the hub of the cooking station. Some like to install a pot filler faucet in the wall behind their range.

Utensils, pots, spices and all other essential items should be located in drawers and cupboards around the stove. This will allow you to stay at the cooking station and save you a lot of steps. Allot room for counter space on both sides of the stove to ensure you have enough space for food preparation.

According to the Small Homes Council each side of the triangle should be between 4 feet (1.2m) and 9 feet (2.7m), and the sum of the three sides should total no more than 26 feet (7.9m).

***

This article goes on to show some pros and cons of several different layouts



Co-CL for "The Stitcher's Niche" and CL for "Remodel & Renovate"




Visit me at That Yank In... and Traveling with That Yank


Avatar made with Portrait Illustrator Maker



Stitchery WIPs: "Bath 5¢", "Walking to Town", a selection of 8 San Man snowman charts, 2 sets of curtain tie-backs using a DMC freebie chart and the DMC linen threads, a Kooler Design Studio chart form JanLynn called "Needlework Shop", "Tsunami Charity Sampler" from the fall 2007 Sampler & Needlework Quarterly, and "Autumn Leaves" from the December 2006 New Stitches



CL for

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-05-2003
Sun, 05-25-2008 - 10:21am

http://www.kitchens.com/01-Kitchen-Design/Kitchen-Space-Planning/work-triangle.asp

The Work Triangle

The dominant geometric shapes in most kitchens are the four-sided variety, from rectangular cabinetry to square appliances. But it is a triangle—albeit an imaginary one—that has always been an important element of a kitchen’s design and functionality.

The “work triangle” is defined by the National Kitchen and Bath Association as an imaginary straight line drawn from the center of the sink, to the center of the cooktop, to the center of the refrigerator and finally back to the sink. The NKBA suggests these guidelines for work triangles:

The sum of the work triangle’s three sides should not exceed 26 feet, and each leg should measure between 4 and 9 feet.

The work triangle should not cut through an island or peninsula by more than 12 inches.

If the kitchen has only one sink, it should be placed between or across from the cooking surface, preparation area, or refrigerator.

No major traffic patterns should cross through the triangle.

Efficiency is the triangle’s main goal, as it keeps all the major work stations near the cook, without placing them so close that the kitchen becomes cramped. The work triangle is also designed to minimize traffic within the kitchen so the cook isn’t interrupted or interfered with.

Read the rest of teh article to see some sample layouts...



Co-CL for "The Stitcher's Niche" and CL for "Remodel & Renovate"




Visit me at That Yank In... and Traveling with That Yank


Avatar made with Portrait Illustrator Maker



Stitchery WIPs: "Bath 5¢", "Walking to Town", a selection of 8 San Man snowman charts, 2 sets of curtain tie-backs using a DMC freebie chart and the DMC linen threads, a Kooler Design Studio chart form JanLynn called "Needlework Shop", "Tsunami Charity Sampler" from the fall 2007 Sampler & Needlework Quarterly, and "Autumn Leaves" from the December 2006 New Stitches



CL for

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-05-2003
Sun, 03-01-2009 - 8:55am

The kitchen work triangle is probably the most researched and applied ergonomic principle around. It is the centerpiece of most kitchen layouts. The goals of a good kitchen work triangle are to place the three most common work sites the most efficient distance apart and to minimize traffic through the work zone.

In the traditional kitchen the three main work sites are:

Refrigerator - the cold storage work site
Sink - the cleaning/preparation work site
Stove - the cooking work site

These represent the three points of the kitchen work triangle. If you place these too far away from each other you waste a lot of steps while preparing a meal. If they are too close to each other you have a cramped kitchen with out any place to work.

http://ergonomics.about.com/od/kitchen/f/work_triangle.htm



CL for

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-05-2003
Sun, 07-05-2009 - 8:43am



















Convenient Kitchen Layouts


























Top 21













Co-CL for "The Stitcher's Niche" and ""Shake Up Your Style" and CL for "Remodel & Renovate"



Visit me at That Yank In... and Traveling with That Yank


Avatar made with Portrait Illustrator Maker




July 25th is Thread the Needle Day.

In these economically challenged times, do you think we need a Repair Manifesto?



CL for

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-05-2003
Wed, 09-30-2009 - 12:00pm












Kitchen Layouts













U-shape









L-shape









Floor plans for any shape







Co-CL for "The Stitcher's Niche" and ""Shake Up Your Style" and CL for "Remodel & Renovate"



Visit me at That Yank In... and Traveling with That Yank


Avatar made with Portrait Illustrator Maker






September is National Sewing Month.
In these economically challenged times, do you think we need a Repair Manifesto?



CL for

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-05-2003
Fri, 04-02-2010 - 12:35pm
10 Delicious Small Kitchens



Smart Layouts and Storage Solutions

Get inspired by our gallery of beautiful, functional small kitchens by top designers.

And get design tips for your small kitchen »



CL for

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-05-2003
Mon, 05-31-2010 - 10:35am

Kitchen floor plans come in many configurations -- L shapes, U shapes, galleys, and more. Find one that suits you to a T.

http://www.kitchenbathideas.com/plan/kitchen/layout/kitchen-floor-plan-ideas/



CL for

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-03-2001
Fri, 01-28-2011 - 12:50pm
Build a new kitchen that works as good as it looks What Is the "Work Triangle?"
Before starting a kitchen remodel, take a moment to consider how it's going to work. • Learn the trick to setting up your triangle »



CL for "

Pages