Make that renovation a green one...

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Registered: 09-05-2003
Make that renovation a green one...
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Sun, 06-01-2008 - 12:25pm

Get Energy Efficient
Use your kitchen remodeling project as an opportunity to reduce your overall energy costs and do something good for the environment while you're at it.

http://www.psncenergy.com/SCANA.ESS.Templates/Content/Content100.aspx?NRMODE=Published&NRNODEGUID=%7b00300069-058C-4813-848A-83D613CC17A6%7d&NRORIGINALURL=%2fen%2fresidential-services%2fremodeling%2fremodeling-tips%2fkitchen%2f&NRCACHEHINT=Guest#Get%20Energy%20Efficient

Replace kitchen appliances with ENERGY STAR qualified appliances. They incorporate advanced technologies that use 10 to 50 percent less energy and water than standard models.

For maximum efficiency and great looks, choose natural gas appliances such as ovens, ranges, cooktops and dishwashers. Depending on the look you're after, consider either built-in or free-standing appliance styles.

Coordinate your appliances with your cabinetry with the use of specially designed panels. Or, go for a color-coordinated look, something more industrial, something retro or even commercial grade.

Take advantage of new technologies and design options too, like hidden control panels, precision and programmable heating and cooling controls and interactive touch screens.

Think about where you're installing your new appliances. For example, install the dishwasher away from the refrigerator. The dishwasher's heat and moisture make the refrigerator work harder. Keep your refrigerator away from other heat sources such as direct sunlight.

Never run out of hot water by installing an efficient natural gas water heater. Consider a tankless model. It can be mounted inside a closet or on the exterior of a home freeing up valuable floor and closet space. The unit can be placed in a recessed box, flush-mounted and painted or textured to match the exterior of the home. Outside units are specially equipped to withstand sub freezing temperatures. Should your unit ever need servicing, a PSNC Energy Certified technician can run a diagnostic outdoors without having to enter your home.

If you'll be opening or moving your kitchen walls, use the opportunity to add insulation and air sealing. It will improve your comfort and the energy efficiency of your home.

If you're replacing the windows, doors and skylights, make sure you install those with the ENERGY STAR label. They are twice as efficient as the average windows manufactured just 10 years ago.

Keep in mind that windows and skylights are also the most energy-efficient method of clearing vapors and indoor air toxins from your kitchen. With enough openings, placed for cross and stack ventilation, you can run your exhaust fan only to evacuate the heaviest cooking odors.

Daylight is the highest quality lighting, and it's free! With work surfaces near windows or skylights, you won't need to use artificial lighting during the day, so you'll save energy. You'll also have views and a connection to the outside.



Co-CL for "The Stitcher's Niche" and CL for "Remodel & Renovate"




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Stitchery WIPs: "Bath 5¢", "Walking to Town", a selection of 8 San Man snowman charts, 2 sets of curtain tie-backs using a DMC freebie chart and the DMC linen threads, a Kooler Design Studio chart form JanLynn called "Needlework Shop", "Tsunami Charity Sampler" from the fall 2007 Sampler & Needlework Quarterly, and "Autumn Leaves" from the December 2006 New Stitches



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Registered: 09-05-2003
Mon, 06-02-2008 - 11:06am

Some eco-"friendly" countertop choices:

http://www.greenhomeguide.com/index.php/knowhow/entry/931/C222/

Countertops are often kitchen showpieces, speaking to the style and environmental sensibilities of the homeowner. And because we prepare our meals on them, their environmental and health effects are intimately linked with our daily lives.

While no countertop material has zero impact on our planet, we believe the materials below have superior environmental and health attributes. For more information on the pros and cons of these materials and others, see our complete guide to choosing countertop materials. http://www.greenhomeguide.com/index.php/knowhow/entry/852/C219

Concrete
Concrete is highly durable and can be poured in place for custom counters. It is not inherently a green product—cement production and transportation are extremely energy-intensive—but if the aggregate is recycled and locally sourced, the energy intensity falls.

Concrete can be molded into custom shapes and dyed almost any color or given distinctive blended looks, though you should inquire about the toxicity of dyes. Once cast into countertops, concrete can withstand heat very well. However, concrete counters should be sealed periodically to limit stains, water damage and bacterial growth, and heat can damage the seal.

Treated well, concrete can last a lifetime. At the end of its useful life in your kitchen, it can be reused whole or cut for other projects. Unwanted concrete can be crushed into aggregate for producing new concrete, saving energy used in mining resources to produce new concrete and keeping old concrete out of landfills.

Glass Tiles
Glass tiles can be environmentally preferable to ceramic—they can have 100 percent recycled content. The production process for recycling glass into tiles, called sintering, consumes far less energy than making new tiles from virgin materials.

Glass tiles scratch more easily than ceramic, however, and may be less uniform, making it necessary to use more grout. Their potential surface irregularity may affect their use as countertops, which is why architects and designers often recommend using them only as accents or backsplashes.

As with ceramic tiles, locally produced tiles are environmentally preferable. Glass tiles do not offgas VOCs if water-based grout is used. Glass tiles are easier than ceramic to reuse or recycle, but removing them is just as difficult.

Paper Composite
Paper composite surfaces are composed of paper and other fibers that have been impregnated with resin. Paper composite handles heat well and is very durable—the material does not nick easily and the darker colors resist staining.

The resin does not come from recycled sources, but it constitutes a small amount of the material. Because the resin is a thermoset plastic, paper-based solid surfaces are not recyclable, though they can be recut and retooled for future use. Overall, solid-paper composites are environmentally preferable to plastic-based solid surfaces since wood is a renewable resource while petroleum is not.

Maintaining paper composites over their long life will reduce their overall environmental impact; a nonabrasive cleaner and a sponge are adequate for routine cleaning.

PaperStone and Richlite are two of the more well-known brands. Richlite uses pulp from sustainably managed forests, and PaperStone incorporates up to 100 percent recycled paper pulp, much of which is post-consumer. Both can be sealed with mineral oil to improve moisture and stain resistance.

Recycled Plastic
Plastic countertops made from recycled materials range widely in look, recycled content, recyclability and composition. Some are made of compressed yogurt containers and aluminum, while others end up looking close to terrazzo (such as Origins, a 100-percent recycled post-consumer polyethylene material made by Yemm and Hart).

Recycled plastic surfaces are typically quite long lasting, resist moisture and do not offgas VOCs—but they burn easily, can be scratched and may warp.

Terrazzo
Terrazzo consists of crushed stone and glass set in a cement or epoxy substrate that is buffed smooth. Overall, terrazzo can be a good green choice due to its 40-year-plus lifespan, low maintenance and high recycled content, especially if you use local materials to avoid transportation-related energy use and emissions. Glass, stone and other recycled materials can make up as much as 95 percent of the materials in terrazzo. Products like those from EnviroGlas and Icestone have particularly high recycled content.

The environmental and health impacts of terrazzo lie in the epoxy or cement substrate, which is up to 30 percent of the material. Epoxy is petroleum-derived, cannot be recycled and can contain a number of potentially harmful chemicals such as phthalates. Once epoxy has cured, it has little impact on air quality, is nonporous and does not need to be sealed.

Cement binders have high embodied energy and contribute greatly to global CO2. Cement-based terrazzo should be sealed to limit staining; it resists scratches extremely well. It can be crushed and incorporated into new terrazzo, effectively recycling it.

Wood
Untreated hardwood certified by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) is the best choice on strictly environmental terms. Since growing and harvesting trees is an environmentally disruptive activity, salvaged wood is environmentally optimal.

FSC-certified wood from local, sustainably managed forests cuts down on shipping costs and energy. Untreated wood is truly a renewable resource, and it requires much less industrial processing than other countertop materials.

Wood is not a good choice for continually wet areas, such as the space immediately surrounding a sink. It can also be burned, scorched, dented and stained, so it requires care and regular cleaning. However, kept sealed with natural mineral oil to prevent drying, wood is a highly durable and healthy counter material. Mechanically fastening wood countertops avoids adhesives and makes removing the material easier.

At the end of its use as a countertop, wood can be reused, given to materials exchanges or, if not treated with toxic materials, chipped and composted or allowed to biodegrade.



Co-CL for "The Stitcher's Niche" and CL for "Remodel & Renovate"




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Stitchery WIPs: "Bath 5¢", "Walking to Town", a selection of 8 San Man snowman charts, 2 sets of curtain tie-backs using a DMC freebie chart and the DMC linen threads, a Kooler Design Studio chart form JanLynn called "Needlework Shop", "Tsunami Charity Sampler" from the fall 2007 Sampler & Needlework Quarterly, and "Autumn Leaves" from the December 2006 New Stitches



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Registered: 09-05-2003
Sat, 06-07-2008 - 7:35pm

from http://homebuilding.thefuntimesguide.com/2007/09/paul_ryan_green_kitchen_ideas.php

Renovating Your Kitchen? Try These Green Ideas And Materials: Tips From A Pro
a segment of an interview by "Randy" with Paul Ryan of DIY Network's Kitchen Renovations and Weekend Handyman.

Green is the word and Paul has some great ideas about what is available for your kitchen renovation or homebuilding project. He offered up just a few of those ideas when I asked him about it recently.

Think "green" materials and ideas when you're renovating!

Randy: Green is big these days.
Paul: Yeah

R: Where do you see the impact in the kitchen area?
P: I'm seeing a lot of paint that people are using...I think they call it "zero fume", I forget the technical term for it but it's no fume or zero fume (zero VOC paint). A lot of people are using that kind of paint.

More info on Low VOC paint: Practical Environmentalist on Low VOC (volatile organic compounds) paint:
http://www.practicalenvironmentalist.com/green-building/low-voc-and-zero-voc-paint-a-tale-of-our-green-renovation-project.htm

...recycle and/or salvage!

P: A lot of people that we're talking to now are recycling. You know...kind of like what's old is new again. We had a lady who's kitchen that we were working on and she found a picture frame from Taiwan that was a beautifully ornate piece of wood carving. She actually made a pot rack out of it. She went with sort of a contemporary look in the kitchen but this pot rack fit because it was absolutely beautiful, but it was recycled!

...bamboo has a lot of potential that's finally being realized by today's consumers

P: You know, a lot of people are using bamboo. Bamboo is a really strong...I can't call it a wood because it's actually a grass, but people are putting bamboo flooring in and bamboo cabinets. The reason for that is because it's a renewable resource and it really grows fast. So people are choosing that over some of the more exotic hardwoods that you might see.

And again... I think we're seeing people are finding other different items to recycle. They kind of incorporate that into the kitchen. Even it's a contemporary look, they still want to recycle old items and find a new use for it.

...cork is a great green choice for flooring...

R: Do you think cork is used anywhere in the kitchen...cork flooring or anything like that?

P: Cork flooring is a natural product. People that want to go green are going with cork because it is a natural product. The one thing about cork is that you have to have a perfectly smooth sub-floor. That's one of the things...that I think, if anything, has deterred people from doing that. It is a lot of prep work. And a lot of times you'll have to go over your existing sub-floor with 1/8" birch...1/4" birch. And then after you put the birch underlayment down, you actually have to come back with a floor smoothing compound to fill in all of the holes from the screws, staples or whatever you're putting down. So you make sure it is perfectly smooth because once you get that cork flooring down, if it's not perfectly smooth...it's just like VCP flooring (vinyl composite). You're going to see the bumps. You're going to see the divots and it's really it's painstaking but cork flooring is really nice. It's smooth. It's easy on the feet. The one thing about it, if you have to replace a cork tile, it's kind of a pain. So the maintenance aspect of it isn't the greatest. And the other thing that we found with cork flooring is that if you try to seal it yourself, you'd better be good at it because it's not that easy. A lot of the tiles will come pre-sealed and I would recommend that because it can be kind of a pain to seal it yourself.

There are plenty of choices of building materials to fill the needs of today's burgeoning green homebuilding trends (hopefully not a trend) that allow consumers to have less of an impact on the environment from both the end product and the production of the materials. If you are putting your homebuilding plans together, I urge you to explore the plethora of green products and ideas that are widely available today. And don't forget to explore your local building material salvage yards. They are a great resource for cheap materials...and a lot of fun!



Co-CL for "The Stitcher's Niche" and CL for "Remodel & Renovate"




Visit me at That Yank In... and Traveling with That Yank


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Stitchery WIPs: "Bath 5¢", "Walking to Town", a selection of 8 San Man snowman charts, 2 sets of curtain tie-backs using a DMC freebie chart and the DMC linen threads, a Kooler Design Studio chart form JanLynn called "Needlework Shop", "Tsunami Charity Sampler" from the fall 2007 Sampler & Needlework Quarterly, and "Autumn Leaves" from the December 2006 New Stitches



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iVillage Member
Registered: 09-05-2003
Thu, 06-12-2008 - 11:44am
Green Kitchen Design

Eco-friendly elements

Earth-friendly kitchen tour

Get a green start



Co-CL for "The Stitcher's Niche" and CL for "Remodel & Renovate"




Visit me at That Yank In... and Traveling with That Yank


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Stitchery WIPs: "Bath 5¢", "Walking to Town", a selection of 8 San Man snowman charts, 2 sets of curtain tie-backs using a DMC freebie chart and the DMC linen threads, a Kooler Design Studio chart form JanLynn called "Needlework Shop", "Tsunami Charity Sampler" from the fall 2007 Sampler & Needlework Quarterly, and "Autumn Leaves" from the December 2006 New Stitches



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iVillage Member
Registered: 09-05-2003
Sat, 06-21-2008 - 10:24am

My computer won't play this but maybe yours will:

Eco-friendly cabinets (a video)
http://www.hgtvpro.com/hpro/pac_ctnt/text/0,2595,HPRO_20196_62157,00.html?&videoid=0102159&nl=v169c



Co-CL for "The Stitcher's Niche" and CL for "Remodel & Renovate"




Visit me at That Yank In... and Traveling with That Yank


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Stitchery WIPs: "Bath 5¢", "Walking to Town", a selection of 8 San Man snowman charts, 2 sets of curtain tie-backs using a DMC freebie chart and the DMC linen threads, a Kooler Design Studio chart form JanLynn called "Needlework Shop", "Tsunami Charity Sampler" from the fall 2007 Sampler & Needlework Quarterly, and "Autumn Leaves" from the December 2006 New Stitches



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Registered: 09-05-2003
Thu, 04-09-2009 - 6:40am

Five Green Ideas for Your Kitchen Renovation

This woman's "green" kitchen remodel used Energy Star appliances, locally made fly ash concrete countertops, Plyboo and Arreis cabinets, no-VOC paints, FSC-certified wood floors, Nu-Wool recycled newspaper insulation, LED lights, and double-paned efficient windows.

http://www.jetsongreen.com/2008/05/five-green-idea.html



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Registered: 09-05-2003
Sun, 04-12-2009 - 7:04am
Create a Dream Green Kitchen - lots of video tips and ideas:
http://www.diynetwork.com/diy/pac_ctnt_988_leader/text/0,,DIY_26336_66417,00.html



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Registered: 09-05-2003
Tue, 04-21-2009 - 12:43pm



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Registered: 09-05-2003
Sat, 10-03-2009 - 2:30pm

Green Renovation Tips - Kitchen
Ways to Go Green When Remodeling Your Kitchen

Read more: http://greenliving.suite101.com/article.cfm/green_renovation_tips_kitchen



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In these economically challenged times, do you think we need a Repair Manifesto?



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Wed, 04-14-2010 - 11:39am



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Registered: 01-03-2001
Mon, 01-17-2011 - 11:34am

While there are many excellent choices for those for whom money is no object, some lesser known and much less expensive options offer the same environmental benefits. With a little knowledge and research, remodeling green can be easy and within your budget.



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