Fireplaces...

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-05-2003
Fireplaces...
5
Sun, 06-01-2008 - 12:27pm

http://www.home-improvement-home-improvement.com/living-Fireplace-Guides.htm

Fireplace Guides

On a cold winter day, something magical happens when you light a fire. The fireplace not only creates a warm and cozy atmosphere, it also is an excellent source for heat. Another huge benefit of having a fireplace is that it will actually help increase the value of a home. It used to be that fireplaces were built pretty much the same. However, the styles available today are amazing!

If thinking about adding a fireplace to your home, you need to consider several things to make the right choice. To ensure you make an educated decision, consider some of the options available:

Pre-engineered Wood-burning Fireplace

Many homeowners who are building a new home or those who want to remodel will consider this type of fireplace for a number of reasons. First, it is easy to install, very affordable, lightweight, and looks like a real masonry fireplace. Being completely insulated, this particular fireplace can be installed within one inch of any combustible materials. Considering that you can buy one of these for $400 to $600, it is easy to see why it is such a popular option. Most come with gas logs or a gas lighter kit as well.

Gas Fireplace

Gas-burning fireplaces are loved by homeowners around the world. Not only is this type of fireplace easy to use but they are beautiful and affordable. Designed to work with gas logs, you will enjoy efficient operation that helps keep the energy bill down. Depending on the unit you buy, you can also buy unit that are self-contained, meaning they have glass doors and blowers that help circulate the warm air more evenly throughout the room. These features can actually help reduce your heating bill by as much as 60%.

If you are remodeling your home, a gas-burning fireplace is indeed the way to go. Typically, this type of fireplace can be installed with little modification, making it an excellent choice. The average cost will run from $1,500 to $5,000, depending on your choice.

Gas Lighter Kit

If you have a wood-burning fireplace, a gas starter kit can save you tons of time! This type of kit is attached to a gas line that is then installed inside the fireplace. Once the wood logs are set inside, all you do is turn the gas on for a few minutes to get the fire going and then shut it off to allow the wood to burn on its own. In most cases, you can hire a plumber to install the line.

Gas Log System

This is very popular for people with existing wood-burning fireplaces who are interested in having a fire without the cost and mess of wood. These systems are installed inside the fireplace and come with ceramic logs that look amazingly real. To have a fire, all you do is turn the gas on and the fire is blazing. Since this type of fire is an immediate on and off, you can manage the temperature in the room easier. Typically, good ceramic logs will run about $500 but they are designed to hold the heat so even when the gas is turned off, you still feel the heat.



Co-CL for "The Stitcher's Niche" and CL for "Remodel & Renovate"




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iVillage Member
Registered: 09-05-2003
In reply to: cl_thatyank
Mon, 06-02-2008 - 11:11am

from http://blogs.move.com/first-time-home-buyers/2007/09/24/fireplace-choices/

Fireplaces offer not only heating but provide a decorative, homey feel. According to Fireplaces-Fireplaces.com, there are several types of fireplaces that can typically be found in a home:

Direct Vent: These are fireplaces which have been “upgraded” from wood burning to gas and are the most popular type. They use vented logs, which also come in a variety according to their differing heat levels. A cautionary note that the site points out is that not only is it required that you have a damper for direct vent fireplaces, but that you have glass doors because the damper needs to be partially open. The glass partition will help to keep smoke and soot out of your home, but must be open while the fire is burning.

Electric: The site states that these fireplaces are excellent alternatives to those that don’t have chimneys, live in an apartment or can’t afford other types of fireplaces. Many can simply be activated by being plugged in and there is also generally a thermostat for you to control the temperature. Again there is a variety of logs to choose from and in addition, the site states that electric fireplaces stay cool, so there is less of a chance of getting burned. Fire and fumes are not a factor and there is usually an emergency shutoff.

Gas: This is an alternative for people that want to cut down on pollution, reduce costs of wood burning fireplaces, and decrease fireplace maintenance. Usually the fuels for these are propane or natural gas. Typically wood burning fireplaces are converted into gas fireplaces, but the website also mentions that freestanding fireplaces can be gas as well. The logs for gas burning fireplaces are stylized to suit particular wood appearances, such as birch, oak and pine. While it is true that there is drastically less cleanup with a gas fireplace, the site suggests that if you want to decrease the possibility of fume hazards, you should consider investing in a direct vent model as described above. Other gas fireplace types include the B Vent, which pulls air from inside the home through “ports that are found in the firebox”.

Rumford: According to the site, this fireplace design was created in 1796 by Count Rumford to generate more heat in the home. It consists of a “tall and shallow” style that not only helps distribute more heat, but keeps smoke from coming into the room. Most of the time, you will find these fireplaces in historical homes. They are generally left intact and not replaced.

Stone: These are fireplaces made with a stone based natural resource such as marble or granite. The site suggests these vary by price because of the factors that must be considered: stone type, color, texture, etc. However, it does point out that the most used stones for fireplaces are limestone and granite.

Vent-Free: A vent-free fireplace or Oxygen Depletion Sensor (ODS), is a fireplace that can operate without a chimney. Safety features include a sensor that adjusts the flame when oxygen levels decrease. The logs are real in appearance, however the flames are not yellow, but blue. Benefits of vent-free fireplaces include thorough heating, decreased expenditures and not having to have the damper constantly open. The site does caution that you check with your local fireplace professional and insurance company to see if your state does or does not allow vent-free fireplaces.

Wood Burning: Although old fashioned, the site maintains that this is the preferred choice of fireplace for most homes. Heating costs tend to be lower and having a blower installed can increase the heat distribution beyond one room. But there is a lot more work involved, including proper cleanup, maintenance of the chimney and proper wood selection. To get the best heat from your wood burning fireplace, the site suggests using hardwoods, for example fruitwood, oak, etc.

In addition to these various fireplace selections, the site FireplacesNow.com http://www.fireplacesnow.com/stoves.asp mentions that some people opt for fireplace stoves, which use fuels such as propane, natural gas, wood and pellets (sawdust with no additives).

If you’re in a new home and considering installing or upgrading a fireplace, some additional resources that you may want to check out are HGTV Remodeling Fireplaces http://www.hgtv.com/hgtv/rm_fireplaces/
and FirePlaceStation http://www.fireplacestation.com/



Co-CL for "The Stitcher's Niche" and CL for "Remodel & Renovate"




Visit me at That Yank In... and Traveling with That Yank


Avatar made with Portrait Illustrator Maker



Stitchery WIPs: "Bath 5¢", "Walking to Town", a selection of 8 San Man snowman charts, 2 sets of curtain tie-backs using a DMC freebie chart and the DMC linen threads, a Kooler Design Studio chart form JanLynn called "Needlework Shop", "Tsunami Charity Sampler" from the fall 2007 Sampler & Needlework Quarterly, and "Autumn Leaves" from the December 2006 New Stitches



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iVillage Member
Registered: 09-05-2003
In reply to: cl_thatyank
Wed, 10-29-2008 - 11:10am




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iVillage Member
Registered: 09-05-2003
In reply to: cl_thatyank
Fri, 12-12-2008 - 3:25am



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Avatar for cl_honeygirl45
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-19-2003
In reply to: cl_thatyank
Fri, 12-12-2008 - 5:28pm

We have a wood stove very much like that picture. Fireplaces are nice to look at but if you want heat in the winter with very little wood a wood stove is the way to go. Some fireplaces have a blower to get some heat from, but regular ones are

                My Honeybear & Zinger! 


iVillage Member
Registered: 09-05-2003
In reply to: cl_thatyank
Mon, 12-15-2008 - 7:45am

What's "hot" in fireplace decor: five decorating ideas for dressing up your fireplace mantel.

http://www.hgtv.com/home-improvement/fireplace-decor-hot-hearths/pictures/index.html?nl=HGDeco_v051_10



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