Celiac friend coming for a visit

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-11-2010
Celiac friend coming for a visit
5
Thu, 04-15-2010 - 12:56pm

Hi everyone,

I'm hoping that you might be able to point me in the right direction here! I have a good friend coming into town from overseas in a little less than a week who has celiac disease, he will be staying with me for about a month. I have to admit that I'm a little intimidated, but I'm determined to make this an enjoyable visit. I have some ideas on what to feed him, but am concerned about a few things. (I apologize if some of this sounds horribly naive and is going to be like playing 20 questions, I just don't want to make him sick and I've never been around someone long term that was a celiac!) I guess I need a feeding a celiac 101 class or something! LOL

Anyway, I'm not sure if he's super super super sensitive (like touching it will make him break out in hives sensitive...I don't think so), but he has said that if he eats anything with it, he ends up in the bathroom all day. He was kind of vague when I asked...any suggestions on other things I can ask?

Do I need to have a separate set of cookware, or will washing suffice?

I do a lot of baking, do I need to be concerned about flour dust floating around that might get on other things?

When I'm buying things and reading over labels, should I only get things that actually say gluten free on them, or is it ok as long as no gluten containing ingredients are listed? I tend to cook mostly from scratch, so additives shouldn't be too much of an issue, but it would be good to know!

What are some starchy type things other than rice, corn, and potatoes that are ok to eat?

When packages say things like "processed in a facility that handles wheat ingredients", are things like that usually ok as long as they don't have any gluten containing ingredients, or should I just avoid them all together?

Thank you so much for any help you can give me in this! I really, really appreciate it!

Mindy

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-19-2003
Thu, 04-15-2010 - 9:20pm

Hello




iVillage Member
Registered: 02-11-2010
Thu, 04-15-2010 - 10:39pm

Wow! Thanks for the help! I think what I'm going to do is just close up all the wheat flours, not buy any wheat breads, (I really don't have much wheaty stuff in the pantry anyway) clean everything in the kitchen really, really well before he gets here (top, bottom, inside out), and then plan for all of our meals to be wf/gf instead of trying to worry about cross contamination.

I will definitely check out the recipes and try some out this weekend as well. I've had g/f pastas and cookies that were pretty good...I think I remember liking the corn based pastas the best. My only real experience with g/f bread was a loaf of ener-g rice bread I had about 10 years ago that was dry and mealy so I've never really explored what's out there. I know that there are many more options out there now than there used to be though!

Reading labels won't be too difficult, I do that all the time anyway to look for certain additives. Thank you for reposting that list, I'm going to print it out and take it with me when I go shopping.

Thanks again for taking the time to answer my questions!

Mindy

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Wed, 04-21-2010 - 10:45pm

Mindy, we do a lot with Tinkyada pastas - they are really very good. Also, there is a brand called Ancient Harvest Quinoa pasta that is also very good - tastes very much like "normal" spaghetti. Tinkyada makes spaghetti, elbow pasta, rotini, penne pasta, and some other kinds. You could make ziti from scratch (I just boil the pasta, add some plain diced tomatoes, g-f spaghetti sauce, and top with shredded muenster, monterey jack, or mozzarella cheese.

I have a blog with a bunch of great recipes (see my sig) and there are also a LOT of mainstream items that are gluten-free. Betty Crocker makes some wonderful mixes (chocolate cake, yellow cake, brownies, and choc. chip cookies). Betty's frostings are gluten-free as well. Lays Products are mostly gluten-free. Doritos (except nacho cheese flavor) are gluten-free. Heinz ketchup is gluten free, as is Hellmanns mayo.

Gluten-free Pantry makes a very NON-MEALY gluten-free bread mix. You can either make it in a bread machine, or make it by hand (it's thin, so you can't really knead it on a countertop...you'd just have to knead it in a bowl and let it rise in the bowl as well before pouring into a bread loaf pan). It really is good bread. That's what my daughter and I eat. I tried the Ener-G bread and the only thing it's good for is making bread crumbs or cubed and dried to make homemade stuffing.

If you wanted to make a soup/soup base, Herb-Ox bouillon is gluten-free. There are some other broths that are gluten-free, but I don't have as much experience with which ones they are. Stay away from Campbells though - they are NOT gluten-free.

I do have a condensed cream soup recipe that works in recipes that call for it, if you wanted that - it's here: http://messageboards.ivillage.com/n/mb/message.asp?webtag=iv-bhceliac&msg=2162.1

I hope you have a great visit with your friend and can find some great things to share food-wise. It looks more daunting than it actually is. If you're not sure about something because ingredients look safe, use google. My favorite thing to do is search "{item} gluten free" and I usually can find out pretty quickly if that item is gluten-free or not. If you have any questions, please do ask!

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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-19-2003
Thu, 04-22-2010 - 3:37am

Thanks Tee for all your great ideas and tips...we can never have enough ideas


i love pasta myself,its also a great standby and so filling a meal cheers


Lynne








iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Fri, 04-23-2010 - 7:20pm

Thanks Lynne. I try to pop in here every so often. Sometimes I have nothing new to add. Other times I just don't get here for weeks at a time.

I do want to add that another favorite here is fresh salads with some cooked chicken (I just cook it in a pan on the stove and you can just add a very small amount of olive oil, salt and pepper for flavor and brown it up on both sides). I cube it up and add it into a salad with lettuce, tomato, carrots, celery, broccoli, and avocado. We're not fans of peppers or cucumbers, but you can add all sorts of veggies: onions, snap peas, zucchini, peppers, cucumbers, mushrooms, etc. I tend to try to go as organic as I can with our salads as well. But, you don't have to.

Oh, you can also just do cut up veggies and Bison Dip - it says right on the Bison Dip container that it's gluten-free. :)

You can also do gluten-free cereal - Nature's Path makes some great ones: Whole-O's (like Cheerios, but gluten-free), Honey'd Corn Flakes, Envirokids cereals (also made by Nature's Path - they have Gorilla Munch that is much like Kix, Peanut Butter Panda Puffs, and Koala Crisp which is like chocolate rice crispies). Erewhon makes a crispy rice cereal (like Rice Crispies). Van's also makes some gluten-free waffles. Or, you can get some Pamela's Pancake & Baking Mix and do pancakes from "scratch" - we love to put blueberries in them. SO Yummy! Just be sure that you buy 100% pure maple syrup because many of those "fake syrups" have gluten in them.

Some great gluten-free crackers are Glutino brand - they're round and taste a little bit like Ritz. We use them with Hummus (we eat Tribe brand - it comes both as organic and non-organic and it should be either in your natural foods section with the organic refrigerated foods or in your dairy section for the non-organic kind).

One more thing - if you do have something like Mayo, peanut butter, jelly, butter/margarine, etc that would normally be served out of the container with a knife and there was possible "double-dipping" of the knife after having touched bread or crackers that contain gluten, then the whole container is now contaminated. At our house, we have separate butter tubs, separate mayo jars, separate peanut butter, separate jelly (each labeled as gluten-free right on the lid or blank if it is the "gluteny" one that my husband can double dip his knife into). That way we can tell right away just by glancing at the lids if the item is the gluten-free one or not. And in case you wanted to know, we use the Smart Balance margarine tub (we get the little ones, since we don't use much margarine) and we use plain butter sticks for baking.

Trying to think of some other things I might have forgotten. Eggs are a good breakfast option if you want to change things up, or you can hard boil for egg salad (you can do this on gluten-free crackers as well, if you don't have a good g-f bread).

I'll try to think of some other ideas.

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Visit my Blog with lots of gluten-free recipes: http://www.glutenfreebeginnings.info
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