No News is Good News I Suppose...

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-05-2008
No News is Good News I Suppose...
10
Tue, 03-23-2010 - 1:27pm
I had my last monthly apptmnt with my OB today and will now being seeing him bi-weekly for the next few weeks, then weekly. I'll also begin weekly ultrasounds and bi-weekly NST's. In light of the recent posts about who's having NST's, how often, and why, I asked why I needed the NST's (even though I did this with both my girls, too) -- was it because I'm old or because I'm a Type 1 diabetic? He said it has nothing to do with my age, but rather, because I'm diabetic. Although I don't mind the actual test, it's pain in the butt for me to get to the hospital during business hours to have this test done since the only person who can watch my two year old is my hubby (who fortunately works at the hospital). Boy, it's times like these I sure miss having any family or friends nearby. Based on the Biophysical Profile ultrasound I had last week, he said the baby is measuring just a little large so he'll likely make 7 lbs by delivery (my girls were 6 lbs 2 ozs and 5 lbs 12 ozs, respectively). On a positive note, he told me I was the best controlled diabetic patient he's ever had which made him consider ordering bi-weekly NST's rather than weekly but he decided he shouldn't be complacent with me since babies of even "well controlled" diabetics can still have complications. I love my doc. : ) Did I ever mention I'm SO DONE with being pregnant?!?!?!?!?

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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-31-2007
Tue, 03-23-2010 - 6:39pm
Joan, you are getting so close! I will be starting weekly NST and u/s at 32 weeks and it is because of my age. Glad to hear that you are doing so well even w/ the diabetes! It won't be long now!

Carol, mom to 6PhotobucketPhotobucket

Carol, mom to 7

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-23-2010
Tue, 03-23-2010 - 7:12pm

It sounds like things are moving forward for you in a good way. Wow, though, I didn't know these weekly NSTs were so common- but now that I think of it one of the docs at my OB clinic did mention having me go in weekly towards the end. And here I was hoping I would just skate to delivery day without much intervention or complication. Now I'm also starting to get more concerned about this skin condition I have that still seems to be spreading. Trying not to start freaking out about everything, but I feel like things have gone so smoothly so far and I'm not sure it can remain this way.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-05-2008
Tue, 03-23-2010 - 9:56pm

Hi Karen. I'm sorry you're not getting the answers you deserve. I know how frustrating that can be. I looked up "skin rashes" in my 'What to Expect When You're Expecting' book and it doesn't go into a great deal of detail about each skin irritation or rash it talks about, but here's what I found for you:

"Irritated Skin Rashes: Often, rashes are triggered by pregnancy-sensitive skin reacting to a product you've used prepregnancy without a reaction. Switching to a gentler product often relieves these contact rashes, but still do let your practitioner know about any persistent rash."

"Strange Skin Bumps; PUPP or PEP: Typically occurs beginning around Week 28. Until delivery, it may help to know that although these new skin eruptions may be uncomfortable (and slightly unsightly), the bumps aren't dangerous to you or your baby. Known medically -- and upronounceably -- as pruritic urticarial papules and plaques of pregnancy (try saying that fast three times), aka PUPP, or PEP (polymorphic eruption of pregnancy), the condition generally disappears after delivery and doesn't recur in subsequent pregnancies. Though PUPP most often develops in abdominal stretch marks, it sometimes also appears on the thighs, buttocks, or arms of expectant moms. Show your rash to your practitioner who may prescribe an antihistamine, or a shot to ease any discomfort. A variety of other skin conditions and rashes can develop during pregnancy (lucky you!) making you less than happy with the skin you're in. Though you should always show any rash that crops up to our practitioner, keep in mind that they're rarely cause for concern."

"Eczema: Unfortunately, pregnancy (or more accurately, its hormones) often exacerbates the symptoms of eczema, and for women who suffer from it, the itching and scaling can become practically unberable. (Some lucky eczema sufferers find that pregnancy actually causes the eczema to go into remission.)
Fortunately, low-dose hydrocortisone creams and ointments are safe to use during pregnancy in moderate amounts. Ask your practitioner or dermatologist which ones he or she recommends. Antihistamines may also be helpful in coping with the itchiness, but again, be sure to check with you practitioner first. Cyclosporine, long used on sever cases that dn't respond to other treatment is generally off limits during pregnancy. Some topical and systemic antibiotics may not be safe for use during pregnancy either, so check with your practitioner first. The newer nonsteroidals (Protopic and Elidel) aren't recommended because they haven't been studied in pregnancy and can't be ruled safe until more is known.
If you're an eczema sufferer, you know that preent can go a long way in keeping the itch away. Try the following:
- Use a cold compress -- not your fingers -- to curb the itch. Scratching makes the condition worse and can puncture the skin, allowing bacteria to enter and cause an infection.
- Limit contact with potential irritants such as laundry detergetns, household cleaners, soaps, bubble bath, perfumes, cosmetics, woo pet dander, plants, jewelry, and juices from meats and fruits.
- Moisturize early and often (while skin is still damp, if you're just out of the water) to lock in the skin's own moisture and prevent dryness and cracking.
- Try not to get too hot or sweaty (two of the most common eczema triggers).
- Try to keep your cool, too, when it comes to stress -- a common eczema trigger.
Something to keep in mind: Though eczema is hereditary (meaning your baby has a chance of having it, too), research suggests that breastfeeding may prevent eczema from developing in a child. That's just one more good reason to nurse your baby if you can."

"Fifth Disease: Fifth disease is the fifth of a group of six diseases that cause fever and rash in children. But unlike its sister diseases (such as measles and chicken pox, the ones that get all the attention), fifth disease isn't widely known because its symptoms are mild and can go unnoticed -- or may even be totally absent. Fever is present in only 15 to 30 percent of cases. For the first few days, the rash gives the cheeks the appearance of having been slapped, then spreads in a lacy pattern to trunk, buttocks, and thighs, recurring on and off (usually in response to heat from the sun or a warm bath) for one to three weeks. It is often confused with the rash of rubella and other childhood illnesses or even a sun- or windburn.
Concentrated exposure from caring for a sick child with fifth disease or from teaching at a school where it is epidemic somewhat increases that very small risk of contracting the illness. But half of all women of childbearing age had fifth disease during childhood and are already immune, so infection, happily, isn't common among pregnant women. In the unlikely event that a mom catches fifth disease nd her fetus does become infected, the virus can disrupt the developing baby's ability to produce red blood cells, leading to a form of anemia or other complications. If you do contract fifth disease, your practitioner will follow you for signs of fetal anemia with weekly ultrasounds for eight to ten weeks. if the baby is infected during the first half of pregnancy, the risk of miscarriage increases.
Again, the odds that fifth disease will affect you, your pregnancy, or your baby are very remote. Still, as always, it makes sense to take the appropriate steps to avoid any infection while you're expecting."

It sounds like the possibility that you have Fifth disease is pretty remote, but it was mentioned in this book as a skin irritation/rash so I figured I'd include it rather than not. I hope your OB clinic gets back to you tomorrow and is able to get you in to look at you. There's nothing worse than being left with a wandering mind about something you can't get definitive answers to. I'll keep you in my thoughts. Please keep us posted on what happens. Best wishes to you.

   
Edited to say: Duh! I should've posted this in your skin rash post, not this one. I'm going to copy the text of the preceeding into your skin post just so it's there for you and/or future readers of your original post.


  




Edited 3/23/2010 9:58 pm ET by cl-my2girlslilahandeva

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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-05-2008
Tue, 03-23-2010 - 10:04pm
Hi Carol. Thanks so much for the response. I actually kind of like the NST's, it's just harder to accommodate the added appointments with a two year old in tow... Hope you're feeling well and getting enough rest.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 12-08-2009
Wed, 03-24-2010 - 8:37pm

Joan,

Congrats on doing so well controlling that diabetes! I did really good with Mary (6lbs 12oz), but not as well with Ben (8lbs 7oz) and needed to take glyburide before bed with him! Of course, my diabetes is only gestational...Type 1 is so much more complicated.

Personally, I love the NSTs, but as you mentioned...so much more difficult with little people in tow!

Take care,
Val

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-05-2008
Wed, 03-24-2010 - 9:17pm
Thanks for the words, Val. Yes, I agree with you about the NST's. I actually like the tests, too, (heck, I even like the weekly u/s's and doc aptmnts, LOL!, it's just difficult for my hubby to break from work to keep Eva occupied for all these appointments. Within the next few weeks I'll be having weekly doc apptmnts in addition to weekly u/s's and weekly NST's. But, I'm in the home stretch now. I hope you're feeling well. I'm just about to read your post about spring break -- Lilah's ended last week so I'm curious to see what you have to say about it..... : ) Thanks again for the words of encouragement.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 01-11-2010
Mon, 03-29-2010 - 6:05pm

Joan, you're getting so close now. How exciting!


Best wishes for smooth sailing from here on out, Melinda


 

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-05-2008
Mon, 03-29-2010 - 9:11pm
Thanks so much, Melinda. I appreciate your words of support. : )

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iVillage Member
Registered: 04-06-2006
Fri, 04-02-2010 - 8:53am

Hi Joan,


I don't know what NST's are, but I just wanted to wish you a happy, serene and peaceful Easter weekend with your girls and your DH!


Have you colored eggs with your girls these days??


Take care!


Molly

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-05-2008
Fri, 04-02-2010 - 10:22am

Hi Molly. Thanks for the well wishes. NST's is an acronym for Non-Stress Tests. They're not a big deal, just a pain in the butt to get to once a week on top of weekly ultrasounds and weekly doc appointments -- none of which occur at the same time or at the same location...

We'll be dying eggs tomorrow. DH is golfing all day today and I have pies and cole slaw to make today for our Easter dinner (we're having it at friends tomorrow night instead of Sunday) so I think it's best to wait for DH to be around to dye eggs. So tomorrow it is. I hope you're feeling well. Thanks again for the support. Have a great weekend. : )

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