If you are in a multi-cultural family...

iVillage Member
Registered: 11-16-2001
If you are in a multi-cultural family...
69
Mon, 05-03-2010 - 10:46am

Which culture is more dominant and why?

In which ways do you live/observe/celebrate the non-dominant culture?













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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-09-2007
Tue, 05-04-2010 - 2:13am

Good question Poppy.


I’m not sure if one is more dominant than the other in our household.

 
iVillage Member
Registered: 11-16-2001
Tue, 05-04-2010 - 4:47am

That makes a lot of sense and is probably how it works for most families.













iVillage Member
Registered: 06-06-2002
Tue, 05-04-2010 - 6:33am

Because we live in Scotland, Scottish and British culture is clearly dominant.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 05-16-2008
Tue, 05-04-2010 - 3:57pm

Since her dad is not in the picture much- it's mainly the American culture.
I'm Caribbean (Haitian) and I need to make an effort for her to get a better understanding of my heritage to pass on to her.

The celebrations from her dad's culture (German) he tells me are mainly the Christian Holidays and involve drinking.

Hopefully it will make more sense when she's older.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 06-06-2002
Wed, 05-05-2010 - 5:00am
LOL about the German culture involving drinking.
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iVillage Member
Registered: 11-16-2001
Thu, 05-06-2010 - 11:13am
Culture and customs sometimes seeps in stealthy ways and I think one day your daughter will wake up and realize that there are parts of her that were influenced by her Turkish heritage.












iVillage Member
Registered: 11-16-2001
Thu, 05-06-2010 - 11:27am

You know, I dated a German for a couple of years and I really never asked more about his family traditions. He held a German passport but he probably lived only bit more than a year there. He grew up in the Caribbean and thinks it's normal to have a sunny Christmas on the beach. I grew up in Montreal, and I still find it very strange to not have snow for Christmas. He would sometimes be late and I was always super-punctual. Talk about being in a mixed couple. We were very much a mixed-up one LOL!

I'll have to ask his mom what their traditions were!

Your daughter is a lucky princess to have you as her mom :-)













iVillage Member
Registered: 11-16-2001
Thu, 05-06-2010 - 11:54am

Good point.

Both my parents were social drinkers when we were growing up (and smoked and ate pork and were largely not practicing), so my brothers and I all drink. We also still eat pork, too. My mother stopped eating pork around 25 years ago, and my dad more recently until about a year before his death.

My nephew, however, has Koran reading lessons at home to supplement religion classes at school. His maternal side of the family is pretty much practicing, meaning his grandparents are pretty much practicing but it's different with the children. But for the time being the grandchildren are being brought up like good moderate Muslims who adhere to the no alcohol no pork ban. It'll be interesting to see how he will handle all this in his late teens and as a young adult.













Avatar for prinsessa
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-29-2003
Thu, 05-06-2010 - 2:22pm

I would say that the American culture is predominant in our house.

Sarah...mommy to Janessa and Julian


iVillage Member
Registered: 11-16-2001
Mon, 05-10-2010 - 10:25am

It's wonderful that you mother takes your kids to Buddhist events. It's a precious glimpse to this faith in addition to time with their grandmother.

I think it's so cool that your children are exposed to different cultures and ideas. If you were in Colorado, I'd introduce you to my brother's "other" family. They are American, but the mom is Swedish (and my brother, of course, is Indonesian.)












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