help, please

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-25-2008
help, please
5
Sun, 08-22-2010 - 10:28am

I am in a big of a battle with DH on keeping DD ERF. She is 14 months and just approaching the 20 lb mark. he thinks she looks uncomfortable and wants to turn her.

He also has a theory that if we were rear ended she would be WORSE off rear facing that forward facing. Because if someone pushes you in the back, look what happens to your head. I am having a very tough time explaining physics to him on this:) does anyone know of a video with a rear impact? all i can find anywhere show a head on collision.

any other help explaining this to him would be VERY VERY much appreciated! I am putting my foot down that this is not for debate, but I would like to end this argument and have him on my side for the inevitable fight with my mother and MIL.

thank you so so so much in advance:)!!


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iVillage Member
Registered: 10-27-2003
In reply to: amytude713
Sun, 08-22-2010 - 10:39am

Here you go.

 
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iVillage Member
Registered: 10-25-2008
In reply to: amytude713
Sun, 08-22-2010 - 10:47am

thank you:)! I will add this to my arsenol:)

but what i really need is a video that shows what would happen if our car was rear ended. he thinks she would be hurt worse than if she were ff


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iVillage Member
Registered: 05-24-1999
In reply to: amytude713
Sun, 08-22-2010 - 1:30pm

I wish I could find another you tube. But one thing to consider is that when the baby is rearfacing, the seat is more of an angle so the force is spread out differently than when the baby is forward facing and more of an upright sitting position.

http://www.car-safety.org/rearface.html this is a direct quote from that link:
"Rear-facing carseats may not be quite as effective in a rear end crash, but severe frontal and frontal offset crashes are far more frequent and far more severe than severe rear end crashes."

I understood that to mean, basically in a rear end crash there may not be a huge difference in safety between forward facing and rear facing for a toddler, rear facing isn't worse than forward facing just about the same especially when most rear end crashes are relatively low speed compared with many front end crashes. However, the difference is so monumentally huge in a frontal crash between forward facing and rear facing. That it makes sense to leave the baby rear facing.

It's a tough situation, if the baby is with you in the car you drive more often maybe you can convince him to leave the baby rf in your car.

Cathie mom to Audrey & Emily 12 yrs, Libby 2 yrs
Cathie, mom to Audrey & Emily 12 yrs, Libby 2 yrs
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-25-2008
In reply to: amytude713
Sun, 08-22-2010 - 2:27pm

ooooh:) thank you!!! that is a great explanation!

she *WILL* be RF :) there is no debate on that part. I just really wanted to get him on my side so i don't have to hear it anymore. And I know my mother and mil will have their many many comments about how she is lonely and bored back there (groan-they have said that since she was born) I was hoping to have him as a united front to tell them to stuff it.

eh, at least he is with me about the giant puffy snowsuits my mother thinks she should be in even after that whole discussion.

thanks so much again!


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iVillage Member
Registered: 06-18-2004
In reply to: amytude713
Sun, 08-22-2010 - 7:48pm

Have you seen this video? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sssIsceKd6U


This might also be helpful: http://www.safecarguide.com/img/angle468NEW.gif


Here's the one to share with grandma: www.joelsjourney.org. Tell her how you hope she is never in the same position as Joel's grandpa.


Rear-end collisions are usually less severe. Usually a person who rear-ends another person is in the process of slowing down. The person behind is going faster than the person in front, but the difference in speed is much less than when you are going in opposite directions and collide. One reason that rear-end collisions are less common and less severe