When to call your Doctor

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-02-2009
When to call your Doctor
16
Sat, 07-03-2010 - 12:18am

This is advice from an American medical website:



When to call your doctor



  • If the wound does not stop bleeding.

  • If your son does not have a wet diaper within 6 to 8 hours after the circumcision.

  • If the redness and swelling around the tip of the penis do not go away or get worse after 3 to 5 days.

  • If there is a yellow discharge or coating around the tip of the penis after 7 days.

  • If the Plastibell device does not fall off within 10 to 12 days.

I'm trying to find the words to illustrate my reaction...


In England and any other medically advanced nation, advice like this is never even considered! 'When to call your doctor' is a common heading on medical websites, but to see it applied to secular male infant circumcision is, quite frankly, appalling.


I know I'm not offering anything new to the content of the USA's iViillage outlook on male child circumcision, but there's an offspring UK iVillage website with not so much as a mention in favour of anything so routine or culturally acceptable as the removal of little boys' foreskins.


Perhaps the issue of secular infant circumcision in the US has no more or less impact than the issue of bottle or breastfeeding - or the many other matters of child care which we all share. If that's true, I despair.


Christopher


CL - Circumcision Debate


"Education is the discovery of our own ignorance." Will Durant


"Almost any manmade phenomenon is explained by tradition, inertia - or both." Anon


CL - Circumcision Debate


"Education is the discovery of our own ignorance.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 01-15-2009
Sat, 07-03-2010 - 9:06am

Perhaps the issue of secular infant circumcision in the US has no more or less impact than the issue of

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-04-2009
Sat, 07-03-2010 - 9:40am

<>

That may be true in some areas, but I know at least in the NYC metro area, that medical schools (for instance NYU's) aren't pro-circ at all. They're more of a "it's not needed, but parents request it, but you can tell them it's not needed so they know". Younger doctors coming up aren't as pro-circ (fortunately) as they were 20 years ago. This fact is known to the AAP/CDC which is why 1) the doctors at the AAP conference were against circ even when the board presented their pro-circ case, and 2) the steering committee at the AAP task force is trying to hard to find any kind of evidence for circ. Fortunately, most doctors, and actually a good amount of people on the street, aren't falling for it. In fact, they feel that their intelligence is being insulted with the kind of garbage being propagated. Everyone, from doctor down to the open-minded man-on-the-street says "well if you still need to use a condom, what good is it?".

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-15-2009
Sat, 07-03-2010 - 9:59am

Fortunately, most doctors, and actually a good amount of people on the street, aren't falling for it. In fact, they feel that their intelligence is being insulted with the kind of garbage being propagated.


I find that very encouraging, because with the circ rate still above 50% it does not appear that way.


I live in Canada, where our circ rate has declined significantly, however, some years ago I contacted our own College of Physicians and Surgeons here in Alberta to enquire about their stance on RIC.

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-21-2007
Sat, 07-03-2010 - 12:56pm

"Perhaps the issue of secular infant circumcision in the US has no more or less impact than the issue of bottle or breastfeeding - or the many other matters of child care which we all share. If that's true, I despair."

In my personal experience, bottle or breastfeeding is a much larger consideration for most new parents. Other things, like scheduling or feeding on demand are also considered more important. I'm from the midwest, which has a very high circ rate. It is simply what is done, with little or no thought into the matter. It is common thought (even so far as to come from my obstetrician) that only certain racial minorities leave their sons intact (and, I think, there is a certain racism in this thought--that they don't know better or are taking their strange practices with them). In fact, my ob was second generation Korean, and talked about how many problems other Koreans have when they choose to keep their sons intact and then needed to get circumcisions in adulthood. She told me I would be the only Caucasian family in the practice that year that kept their son intact. Ugh.

Anyway, my social circle is in general very liberal, and very educated, of people in the mental health or medical field with doctorates or master's for the most part. They are the type of people who like to be well informed on every major decision and are in general open to debate it with others. However, circumcision was considered such a non-issue that people really didn't look into it, and there was nothing to debate. Leaving your son intact was not considered a bad thing per se, just a bit odd, and may be a problem somewhere down the line. There wasn't considered to be many pros or cons on whatever is decided. When I have tried to open the debate to some people online it is kid of a joke...there is nothing else to debate so now we are bringing up such a non-issue as circumcision?



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iVillage Member
Registered: 07-02-2009
Sat, 07-03-2010 - 8:56pm

Hakunan, I wish I had not hit the nail so squarely on the head - and perhaps Youknowitstrue has vindicated my wish?


Cait? Lyn? Caitlyn? Your experience as a midwest parent with an intact boy exemplifies all that is worst of America's circumcising culture. With this in mind, how would first-time parents in Ohio


CL - Circumcision Debate


"Education is the discovery of our own ignorance.

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-21-2007
Sat, 07-03-2010 - 10:07pm

Cait or Caitlyn works :-)

Yes, I think most people in this culture will read that without much concern. It is all potential problems, and everything has a risk. A little discomfort and risk now for a lifetime of lower risk. I think it is viewed a necessary by many parents...not something they want to go through, but for the best. Just one of the downsides of having a male baby.

A small memory...I was so afraid of my son being circumcised against my will in the hospital. I had heard horror stories of this. I made sure that my obstetrician knew my wishes (although she strongly disagreed and we had debated twice on the subject) and also let my nurses know it. I remember at shift change a nurse checking in asked if he had been circumcised yet. Not if it was even going to happen, just if it had already happened or was on the itinerary for the day. Just shows how unusual it was in the area to not have the surgery performed.

I haven't had any problems with pediatricians or family doctors, luckily. Although I've stayed alert about doctors that may try to retract or advise us to do it, any doctor I've had contact with knew the correct care. I have some concern for my son starting day care for the first time this fall since he isn't potty trained yet, and I don't think he'll be ready any time soon. I hate to make a bad first impression by going in there in education mode for something that should be common knowledge, but I guess I have to, to be safe.

I didn't know that about Koreans and circumcision at the time...although part of her message was that circumcision was necessary as adults in her family. She told me that the adult males had so many problems they had to be circumcised, and as a precautionary measure circumcised their children (not infants). Given her family history, she advises all of her patients to get it done now to avoid problems later that would necessitate circumcision. She was also adamant that her babies she circumcises don't feel pain due to the anesthetic, something that I had believed at the time but after doing more reading on the anesthesia used for infants, I have my doubts.



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iVillage Member
Registered: 01-15-2009
Sun, 07-04-2010 - 9:26am

She told me that the adult males had so many problems they had to be circumcised, and as a precautionary measure circumcised their children (not infants).


I am very curious about this statement because I know that I have read a statistic that stated that something like one in 16,000 Scandinavians will die without his foreskin. In other words;

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-02-2009
Sun, 07-04-2010 - 7:07pm

Caitlyn (that's a lovely name, so thank you, I will use it in future),


"I hate to make a bad first impression by going in there in education mode for something that should be common knowledge, but I guess I have to, to be safe."


It would seem you will have to, but it need not make a bad impression if you choose your moment intuitively and use non-confrontational terms. You're an intelligent woman; you will work the oracle for your darling son. :)


I must concur with Hakunan and share his puzzlement that adult males in her family had "so many problems they had to be circumcised." Do you know if these problems were specifically foreskin related? Adult males contract genital infections with or without a foreskin. Adult females even more so. Perhaps there was a family history of


CL - Circumcision Debate


"Education is the discovery of our own ignorance.

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-20-2008
Mon, 07-12-2010 - 3:18pm
I am also from the high-circ midwest, and have had the same kind of anxiety about the hospital staff just assuming a circ is going to happen and it happening against my will.

Robynne mama to Emily (3/26/99), Allison (5/13/02)

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-23-2010
Tue, 07-13-2010 - 4:55pm
What problems occurred after your son's forcible retraction?

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