definition of "afford"?

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-03-2007
definition of "afford"?
12
Sun, 12-14-2008 - 9:41am

I think I may have posted a similar thread a while ago, but the topic just interests me.

Emily

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iVillage Member
Registered: 12-03-2007
Sun, 12-14-2008 - 10:01am

So I'll go ahead and answer my own post.

Emily

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-03-2004
Sun, 12-14-2008 - 10:04am

Great question.

Avatar for mom_x_three
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Sun, 12-14-2008 - 11:57am

good question, with no easy answer for me

usually it means (to me) that we have enough cash on hand to pay for it, but sometimes life happens and there are needs (and some wants) that are not budgeted for....

for example, my son was recently in a car accident and our part of the bill is our out-of-pocket maximum for the year $3200 for the hospital, and there will be some more copays for doctor visits. He was also care-flighted to the hospital and I think we'll owe a percentage of that.

I could have (and frugally speaking I probably should have) said, we can't "afford" Christmas gifts because of the unexpected bills....but instead, we'll make a payment plan with the hospital (if the auto insurance doesn't pay what the health insurance didn't) and we still decided we could "afford" a fairly nice Christmas for everyone, although it's much smaller than previous years due to DH's long unemployment,etc. There are 3 gifts for each of our kids, a few more for the grandkids, and a little something for our parents/siblings/nephews. We also still donated to the Salvation Army and St. Jude's for the holidays, but a little less than in the past as well.

Sherry


happily married since 2003...a blended family with 4 kids, 1 grandchild and second grandbaby due in September

Sherry<with 3 kids, 2 beautiful granddaughters

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-14-2006
Sun, 12-14-2008 - 3:19pm

I think it makes a difference whether or not it is a necessity or a want.


For a want being able to afford it not only having the cash on hand but that using that cash will not possibly cause problems in the future.


For a need being able to afford it means we have whatever means are needed and that includes charging if we have to.


Having cash on hand does not mean that we can afford something if that cash is something that we may need for neessities later.


Does it matter what it is?

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-26-1997
Sun, 12-14-2008 - 3:39pm
I think afford goes both ways.

 

Avatar for earnhardt_jr_fan
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-25-2003
Sun, 12-14-2008 - 3:47pm
I define being able to "afford" something if the purchase does not cause your family a hardship financially. I would like to say that affording it is buying it outright, but many things we buy in life aren't bought outright (cars and houses are big ones), but we can "afford" them in our budget. If you can afford to buy a big screen tv and it doesn't cause your family a hardship later than you can afford it. But, if buying the big screen means something in your life doesn't get paid or is paid late -- then you can not afford it.
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Avatar for monkeesmom
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Sun, 12-14-2008 - 5:58pm
To me , it is not only a question of whether I have the money for it...but am I willing to spend my money on it.





 

Avatar for indexlady
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-29-2003
Sun, 12-14-2008 - 9:24pm

My take on "afford" is very similar. It's not just about whether or not there IS

Avatar for earnhardt_jr_fan
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-25-2003
Sun, 12-14-2008 - 9:26pm

I think that a lot of people say "I can't afford _________" as a way of saying they do not want to spend their money on it. I

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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2005
Sun, 12-14-2008 - 10:51pm

how do you define whether or not you can afford something?


I define being able to afford something as being able to pay cash for the item.

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