Why do I fail at making...

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-09-2005
Why do I fail at making...
16
Tue, 12-23-2008 - 11:40pm
Cookies!?

Photobucket


 


Pages

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Wed, 12-24-2008 - 6:17am
You could blame your oven. Or it could be that you're rolling them too thin (if they are rolled cookies). Or it could be your choice of fat (butter, lard, margerine and shortening are all going to produce somewhat different results). Keep in mind, too, that many cookies, particularly traditional Christmas cookies, are not cake-y, and they are not soft. It could just be your recipes. If you are not creaming your butter and sugar (in recipes that call for creaming) to the right texture, that will have an effect on your cookies. Your baking sheets could be the culprit (I have a set of stainless steel half sheet pans that I love, and I have set of Baker's Secret non-stick pans that I don't love, the former turn out vastly superior cookies). Could be overcooking them (many cookies, you want to pull them before the sides and tops are brown, just the bottoms should be brown, and on some cookies, the bottoms should be a very light brown).


Carrie
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Wed, 12-24-2008 - 8:07am

My guess is that 90% of it is your cookie sheet. I use commercial sheets called a half bun pan that I get at a restaurant supply. They are heavy aluminum and cost about $5.00 each. They are VASTLY superior to any other thing I've ever used. I even had some of those air sheets. And you want them bright and light, not dark in color. Dark absorbs more heat and makes the cookie browner.

Make sure they are cool between each batch. If you put a fresh batch on a hot sheet, it will spread too much and thus get overcooked and lose it's shape.

I still have trouble too, but mostly because I'm higher than Denver in altitude, but having good cookie sheets made my cookies much better.

Good luck,

Laura



iVillage Member
Registered: 03-11-2008
Wed, 12-24-2008 - 9:44am
Do you use butter instead of shortening or margarine? You'd think that would make cookies more delicious, but it tends to make cookies spread out flat. If you want crispy thin cookies it's ideal, but if you want dense, chewy cookies it's not going to work.


Laura

Image hosted by Photobucket.com

Laura

Avatar for monkeesmom
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Wed, 12-24-2008 - 9:51am

Chocolate chip cookies, IMHO, are the easiest to make. As are oatmeal cookies, or peanut butter (I am a drop cookie fan!).


I always make them by hand - I like the process of creaming the butter and sugar together. It takes longer, but I really enjoy it. I always use butter. I always scoop my flour with a large spoon and sift slightly into the measuring cup and then level off with the back of a knife...I never scoop directly out of the bag using the measuring cup, it gets too packed down and won't give you an accurate measurement. I use heavyweight aluminum pans and always use parchment paper. I prepare 2 trays, but only bake one at a time, so that I always have something in the oven and something cooling. I bake my chocolate chip cookies for about 10-12 minutes depending on size. I let them cool slightly on the tray, and then remove them to a cooling rack.


Good luck





 

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-09-2005
Wed, 12-24-2008 - 10:02am

Aha... my cookie sheets are horrible and I do live in high altitude too, Salt Lake City.

Photobucket


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 07-09-2005
Wed, 12-24-2008 - 10:03am
OH I do use butter!

Photobucket


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 07-09-2005
Wed, 12-24-2008 - 10:04am
Thanks, great tips!

Photobucket


Lilypie 1st Birthday Ticker



Lilypie 4th Birthday Ticker


Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 07-26-1997
Wed, 12-24-2008 - 11:17am
I can fit full bun pans in my oven.

 

Avatar for momtb4
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Wed, 12-24-2008 - 12:01pm

Also, if you melt rather than soften your butter, your cookies will spread. I often melt my butter (well, I use margarine, I'm cheap that way) and then once the dough is mixed, it goes back in the fridge to firm up again so it will bake right. If I'm in a hurry, I just add more flour until I get what I want.


It's ok to bake 2 or 3 cookies and see what results you get. If they spread too much, add some flour (like a handful) and mix well, then bake a few more and see.

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-30-2003
Wed, 12-24-2008 - 1:35pm

Corinne, I am a fellow Utah girl (I remember you from the board) I'm also a bit famous for my cookies.


Pages