Fluid drained from wrists????

Avatar for lee732000
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-25-2003
Fluid drained from wrists????
8
Tue, 03-25-2003 - 11:47am
Hi ladies! I was just wondering if anyone knows if fluid can be drained from the wrists like it can be in the knees??!! I had both knees done a couple of yrs. ago & haven't had any more problems with them. I still have a lot of sinovitis in my wrists. I see my rheumy Fri. & plan to ask her, but just curious if anyone knew!

Hope you all are having a good day! Looks like we seem to be managing this board well!

Love,

Lee

Lee

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-19-2003
Tue, 03-25-2003 - 1:02pm
Lee, I believe that most joints can indeed be aspirated. I am sure that your rheumy will be able to do this for you, if she thinks it will help. Here's some information for you:

What is a joint aspiration?

A joint aspiration, or arthrocentesis, is a procedure whereby a sterile needle and syringe are used to drain fluid from the joint. Joint aspiration is typically performed as an office procedure or at the bedside of hospitalized patients.

What is the purpose of joint aspiration?

Joint aspiration is used to obtain joint fluid for examination in the laboratory. Analysis of joint fluid can help to define causes of joint swelling or arthritis, such as infection, gout, and rheumatoid disease. Joint fluid can be tested for white cell count, crystals, protein, glucose, as well as cultured for infection.

Joint aspiration can also be helpful in relieving joint swelling and pain. Removal of joint fluid that is inflamed can also remove the white blood cells within that are sources of enzymes that can be destructive to the joint. Occasionally, cortisone medications are injected into the joint during the joint aspiration in order to rapidly relieve joint inflammation and further reduce symptoms.

How is joint aspiration performed?

The skin over the joint is sterilized using a liquid, typically iodine solution (Betadine). Local anesthetic is used in the area of the joint; either by injection, topical liquid freezing, or both. A needle with a syringe attached is inserted within the joint an fluid is sucked back (aspirated) into the syringe. For certain conditions the doctor will also inject medication into the joint after fluid removal. The needle is then removed and a band-aid or dressing is applied over the entry point.


I'll be praying for you, Lee. Love, Amy

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-22-2003
Tue, 03-25-2003 - 2:00pm
{{{{Lee}}}} I hope you can get your wrists drained when you see the rheumy. I will be in your pocket - I wonder if we could use one of these sections to post our appointments so that the pocket jumpers can hop on board?!

Good luck, Lee1

{{{gentle hugs}}}

Ang xxx

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Avatar for ladyandy
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-25-2003
Tue, 03-25-2003 - 11:18pm
You can check with your rheumy, but it may not be all that helpful.

I've had fluid aspirated from the back of my left wrist by my orthopedic surgeon. He said there were a couple of compartments that the fluid were in and he drew more and more fluid, and that HURT! I can tell you, I've had my knees aspirated many, many times and it almost never hurts at all, but that back of the wrist thing really burned.

When I saw my rheumy the same week, I told him the ortho did that and showed him the lessened size of the swelling on the back of my wrist. He told me that excess fluid would just collect again, although it certainly wouldn't hurt anything that I'd had it drained.

He was right; by the next week, it looked like nothing had been done.

On the other hand, I have had my rheumy aspirate a joint, then inject it with a cortisone preparation and that almost always helps, at least for a while. He also has me apply ice four times during the day of any joint injection and avoid exercising the joint for a couple of weeks.

Of course in my case, that wrist has been a chronic problem. That swelling that started as fluid became solid synovial tissue in time and after more than a year like that, the rheumy had me go to a hand specialist last December and have it surgically excised.

I'm happy to report that the swelling is now finally gone. The surgeon reported that it was a good thing I had it removed surgically, as there was already some evidence of erosion in the finger tendons at the back of my wrist and if I'd allowed that to continue, in time they would have ruptured.

Now see, I can type with two hands just fine. :)

Avatar for lee732000
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-25-2003
Wed, 03-26-2003 - 12:26pm
Hi Andi & thank you for sharing your experience with me. Well I guess it doesn't sound very encouraging & I guess if it was really helpful, she would have already mentioned it to me! It has become a chronic problem for me too......I NEVER have days when there is no swelling at all. Nothing has helped. A few weeks ago I had a cortisone injection in each wrist & I didn't even get one day of relief from them. Of course I couldn't rest them though with an infant at home, but it they just didn't do a thing. I only had my knees aspirated one time & the swelling never returned so I thought.........

Well, I will mention it to her, but I won't get my hopes up. Can you tell me more about the surgery you had? What did it entail? Recovery time? Wow, I am so glad things have improved for you. That is wonderful news!

Thanks again!

(((Hugs))),

Lee

Lee

Avatar for lee732000
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-25-2003
Wed, 03-26-2003 - 12:29pm
Thank you Amy for all of the wonderful information!! I appreciate it & will let you know how my appt. goes!

Love,

Lee

Lee

Avatar for lee732000
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-25-2003
Wed, 03-26-2003 - 1:18pm
(((Ang))),

Thank you so much. That would be great to have a spot for appts.! Good idea Ang! I will let you know how my appt. goes. I am taking Tyler in his stroller b/c they all want to see him so there will be plenty of room!

I know you have been having a bad week & I'm sorry. :o( Are you feeling any better???

Love,

Lee

Lee

Avatar for ladyandy
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-25-2003
Thu, 03-27-2003 - 12:18am
You said, <>

I had a tenosynovectomy of the left wrist. Luckily I am right-handed, so it wasn't that bad to get over. The thing that took the longest was waiting for that first appointment with the specialist. My rheumatologist told me to see the one guy and no other, so I waited from August until November for my first appointment.

The surgery was Dec. 31. I suspect if there hadn't been a holiday available, I'd have been waiting another month for that operation. :)

The surgery was done on an outpatient basis and took about 2 hours. I had an incision down the center of the back of my left wrist and hand that was about 4 inches long. It was closed with the neatest 30 itty-bitty stitches you ever saw. (I guess this guy is a real perfectionist; the rheumy said he does a lot of plastics work.)

I was given the choice of general or axial local anesthesia and opted for the axial which worked just fine. I don't remember a thing of the actual operation, only the careful detailed explanation of what they were about to do. They gave me an IV and started the sedation through the IV, then, from what I was told but do not remember, they injected the anesthetic into the nerve for my arm through the underarm.

When I woke up, my brother drove me home. My left hand was in a brace and bandage and I was instructed to keep it clean, dry and elevated. I was given an appointment for the following Friday, three days after the operation.

I was given a prescription for Vicodin, but honestly had almost no pain from the actual operation. I did have some pain in my fingers, but that was from the arthritis, not the operation. I also had some pretty significant swelling, in spite of following the directions for elevating the hand all the time and applying ice. The reason was that under the bandage, there was a hard sort of shell thing that was hard and restricted the tissues of my hand.

Happily they cut that thing off my hand on that third day after the operation. My hand looked really grotesque that first day out of the shell brace, but quickly returned to a more normal appearance within a day or two. Towards the end there, the swelling was causing a lot of pain too, so I was one very happy girl to get that thing off. If I hadn't already had an appointment to see the doctor, I might even have gone into an ER to get that thing cut off.

I had the stitches out at about 10 days after the operation. I did have two sessions of physical therapy, but felt really dumb about it as I could tell easily enough what I had to do, so I stopped going and just continued doing the exercises on my own.

There was some residual swelling for about 3 - 4 weeks after, but gradually it kept going down. I did accidentally hit the scar, right on top of that last swollen spot, on the door jamb one day, which hurt like heck... took a 1/2 Vicodin, applied ice, and went to bed.

Surprise, surprise... the next morning that last spot of swelling was gone, just like it had been a bubble that burst or something. Really weird. Anyway, I showed it to the rheumy who had no comment... but it looked fine, so that was that.

I stayed off work about 5 days, but could have gone back a bit sooner if I'd wanted to. I had almost no pain from the operation at all, just an occasional twinge if a bit of fabric brushed it just so, or if a breeze from the air conditioner or something hit it. That extra sensitivity has gotten better and better in time. I wore a brace for about 3 or 4 weeks all together. I have worn wrist splints at night for years now, so I still wear them most of the time, but sometimes I don't need them now. Oh, and I also had some pain when doing the range of motion stretching, but still nothing major.

I do have some slight loss of range of motion in that wrist which I suspect is just because I have so much arthritis in that wrist that even just being immobilized for that short time made things stiffer in there. The hand surgeon did seem pretty surprised how well I move with as much arthritis as he saw in there in my x-rays.

Of course he doesn't know how much exercise I get here on the computer! LOL

Avatar for lee732000
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-25-2003
Thu, 03-27-2003 - 7:01pm
Thank you Andi sooooo much for sharing all of that & for typing so much! I guess you were just exercising that wrist! LOL Your experience sounds pretty positive to me. I don't have any range of motion in either of my wrists as it is. One orthosurgeon who looked at my x-rays said, "you have the wrists of an 80 yr. old woman!" So, I have learned to live with that, but would love not to have the pain. It has improved since the enbrel, but like I said, I have swelling everyday.

Thanks again! Will let you know how the appt. goes!

(((HUGS))),

Lee

Lee