'Fiddle-dee-dee' not a good health motto

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2009
'Fiddle-dee-dee' not a good health motto
4
Mon, 08-02-2010 - 2:19pm
Remember in Gone with the Wind when Scarlett O'Hara says, "Fiddle-dee-dee! I won’t worry about that today. I’ll worry about that tomorrow. After all, tomorrow is another day!" As it turns out, that isn't the best advice to follow when it comes to one's health. I would have done better to take my cue from Dead Poets Society and its message of carpe diem.



Although I feel rather foolish, my hope is that if I post this, perhaps someone will learn from my mistake. As host of the Women's Health board, I often advise women to see their doctors when they feel that something is "off" healthwise. But did I do that myself when I first felt that something wasn't quite right? No, I did not.



Nearly three months ago, I began to suspect that my hypothyroidism wasn't being properly regulated by the daily medication I take. My thought process was "hazy" and I was easily distracted, scatterbrained even. Even though I knew I should go get my thyroid levels checked, I procrastinated. I had several reasons for putting it off, none of them particularly good.



Perhaps the symptoms worsened gradually, I honestly don't know, but things came to a head three weeks ago. My nerves were raw. I was either crying or on the verge of tears much of the time. I felt panicky and paranoid. Still, I deluded myself into believing I was doing a good job of hiding all this from the world. Of course I wasn't.



When a friend shared some completely innocuous news with me, and my initial reaction was to fly off the handle and be angry about it, I had the presence of mind to know that I had procrastinated too long. I made an appointment that day to go see my doctor the following week.



Sure enough, my thyroid was not performing up to snuff, despite daily supplementation. My doctor ordered an increase in the dosage of my thyroid medication, but that can take two weeks or longer to start taking effect. Ten days after starting the higher dosage, I'm happy to report that I haven't felt panicky or paranoid for several days, but if anything, the mental fog got worse last week. I've likened it to swimming through pudding. It seems to be a bit better today, I'm keeping my fingers crossed.



The moral of this story is to act as soon as you don't feel like yourself. Had I learned that lesson earlier, I could have spared my body three months of physical stress (in the form of high cholesterol and high blood pressure, both caused by the underactive thyroid), and my family and friends at least a couple of weeks of concern over my out-of-character reactions.



bunsofclay








    


    
iVillage Member
Registered: 12-25-2006

I'm sure we've all done this at one time or another, but it is a very scary thing to do.











iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2009
Thank you, Moon!


I will definitely follow my own advice in the future and get in to see my doctor if I feel even a little off kilter. The perplexing thing for me is that my symptoms were a lot more severe this time than they have been in the past, when my levels were much worse. I agree, hormones are strange things, and I'll add that the thyroid seems to be a particularly fickle little gland!


In "maintenance mode," how often do you usually get tested?
iVillage Member
Registered: 12-25-2006
Wed, 08-04-2010 - 11:40am

Hi Maureen!


I find my own advice the hardest to follow.....lol.











iVillage Member
Registered: 08-07-2007
Thu, 08-05-2010 - 12:04pm

I'm glad to know that you didn't put it off any longer and went to get checked.