UK Election

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Registered: 03-18-2000
UK Election
2
Fri, 04-23-2010 - 10:14am

2010 General Election campaign Apr 22nd


Above L to R: NIck Clegg, David Cameron and Gordon Brown. 


Guess which media empire Sky belongs? Our old 'friends' the Murdochs.
Media attacks on Nick Clegg put pressure on Conservatives

Liberal Democrat leader's election co-ordinator says it appears Tory high command had orchestrated campaign of negative stories about Nick Clegg in runup to TV debate.


Complete article at link......


http://www.guardian.co.uk/politics/2010/apr/23/nick-clegg-media-attacks


Pressure was today mounting on David Cameron over claims his aides had encouraged the rightwing media to publish smear stories against the Liberal Democrat leader, Nick Clegg, this week, as the election contest remained wide open in the aftermath of the second leaders' TV debate.


Clegg's election co-ordinator, Danny Alexander, said it appeared the Tory high command had orchestrated a campaign of negative stories in the runup to last night's debate in an attempt to neutralise his surge in the polls.


The accusation came as polls revealed that neither Clegg nor Cameron could claim a clear win from last night's debate.


Provisional viewing figures showed four million people watched the debate across the three channels that carried it live: Sky News, Sky Three and the BBC News channel. A further 300,000 watched a repeat on BBC2.


Sky came under fire for stoking the anti-Clegg campaign, with more than 100 people complaining to the TV regulator, Ofcom, about the conduct of the debate moderator, Adam Boulton.


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Sky leaders' debate spin room: the live abortion of democracy

People appeared to to feel personally validated to be there, and firmly under the illusion that the public would kill to get a look in


http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2010/apr/22/sky-leaders-debate-spin-room-abortion-democracy


 

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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-18-2000
In reply to: libraone
Fri, 04-23-2010 - 10:22am
The First TV Debate of the UK Elections

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&tbo=p&tbs=nws%3A1&q=uk+elections&aq=0&aqi=g4g-z1&aql=&oq=UK+election&gs_rfai=


The first TV debate preceding the UK elections has been considered historic as it's the first of its kind in the UK and although largely considered a British version of the American Presidential debates, it is distinct in its character. The debate itself was an excellent exposure to the three main party leaders in the UK and their personalities and although polls say that the liberal democrats won the first debate, the debate seems to have been more than just about winning or losing. It made an impact on the British public and could even redefine the way politics is done in the UK. A land of the British Empire, politics in the UK seem to be now more about connecting with the people directly and TV debates help the entire political process to move closer to true ideals of democracy.


Nick Clegg, leader of the liberal democrats opened the debate by urging people to consider an alternative to "these two' meaning Labour and Tories. With hands in his pocket and a defiant and domineering presence, Clegg contended well with the two more senior leaders. Although a relative newcomer, Clegg seems to have mastered the game very quickly and was able to persuade people to consider him as a potential Prime Minister. The most outstanding trait about Nick Clegg is his intuition combined with assertiveness and this was seen in the way he delivered his speech and arguments to the audience. It was also 'Labour's Love Lost' when Clegg did not agree to agree with Gordon Brown.


Clegg was always intuitively sure that he would win the debates, he was always happy about TV debates which Cameron loathed and Brown was suspicious about. This was Clegg's platform and his opportunity and he made an impact. Now, in the eyes of the British public, he is definitely a possible Prime Minister, and would possibly take the lib dems further ahead in this election and the next elections. Nick Clegg won on confidence.


Leader of Labour Gordon Brown was the more mature of the three. He was smiling and less angry than the other contenders, very patient and acted more as a mature guardian against two defiant people. Gordon Brown definitely showed that his knowledge in politics was the best and most advanced and anyone watching the debates could make out that he is a Prime Minister and not just a contender in elections. His mannerism and attitude were controlled, polished and his arguments were very practical and precise. Gordon Brown continues to stand as the Prime Minister of Britain and although Clegg has now given a big boost to the liberal democrats, Gordon Brown's chances haven't gone down significantly after the debate. He gave his facts, figures and brought substance and practical sensibility to the arguments. Gordon Brown won on content.


Cameron always disliked the idea of a TV debate and the discomfort and dislike showed on his face and attitudes. He was defensive and began slowly but quickly caught the momentum of the debate although even conservative pundits believe he may not have used the stage to his full advantage. We can predict that Cameron will come out better in the later debates as he would now know the strategy that Brown and Clegg have adopted and that is "Tories have no clear policy and no clear figures'. Cameron was also more abstract in his arguments and talked of a bigger society and used other such abstractions and provided more half baked examples from his personal experience than other contenders which may not be a good idea in a limited time debate. A lot will depend on the Tories' campaigning strategy which they are very good at and sometimes better than other parties. Cameron lacked on clarity but the closing statement he made had an impact on the audience and it was better than the other contenders. Cameron could possibly win on the campaigning, if not on the communication.


The first TV debate may not be decisive in terms of results or impact but could have permanently changed the course of this UK election and Lib Dems are predicted to improve their hold significantly across the country. Gordon Brown hasn't lost anything and Cameron and his party will gain momentum in terms of campaigning. Although the campaign heat has just begun, there's a lot of smoke already especially above the British skies and not just due to volcanic ash.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-18-2000
In reply to: libraone
Tue, 05-04-2010 - 8:01am

Live coverage - General Election 2010

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/shared/election2010/liveevent/

Labour warn over backing Lib Dems

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/politics/election_2010/scotland/8659648.stm

Labour's Hilary Benn has said that not voting in the election or backing the Lib Dems will result in a Conservative victory at the polls on Thursday.

The environment secretary's commets came as Mr Benn hit the general election campaign trail in Scotland.

Mr Benn was in the Glasgow North seat, on the day Tory leader David Cameron was also campaigning in Scotland.

"David Cameron is in Scotland today, but he doesn't need your vote to win," said Mr Benn.

He argued the choice for voters on polling day was the same across the UK - David Cameron or Gordon Brown - arguing that seats in Scotland would help decide who was the next prime minister.

"If a vote for the Liberal Democrats leads to David Cameron being prime minister, a lot of people will regret that," said Mr Benn.

"I'm asking people to vote Labour because I think our values are right for the country.

"Labour is fighting for jobs, fighting for families, fighting to protect the recovery, fighting for fairness, fighting for our future."

Mr Benn said: "If you stay home, the Tories will win. If you vote Lib Dem, the Tories will win. If you vote for any other party, the Tories will win."

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