VA-1st State to Block Omamacare

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-10-2009
VA-1st State to Block Omamacare
111
Fri, 03-12-2010 - 5:23pm
RICHMOND - Virginia's General Assembly has become the first state legislature to tell the Obama administration that a mandatory national health insurance plan won't play in the Old Dominion.

The Senate-amended House Bill 10 breezed though the House Wednesday, 80 to 17, with plenty of support from Democrats. Governor Robert McDonnell told CBS-6 Wednesday that he'll sign it.

"We never gave Washington the power to force us to buy any products of any kind," said Del. Charles Poindexter, (R-9th District). "Insurance is a product. They're saying I have to buy insurance." He's proud that Virginia was the first state to strongly take a stand.

This Constitutional sticking point is being considered by more than 30 other state legislatures as national health care reform bills limp forward, seemingly on life support.

But opponents of the measure say Virginia is "getting the cart before the horse," said state Sen. David Marsden (D-37th District). "What if, strangely enough," a health care reform plan everyone likes gets passed in Washington, he asked. "And there's Virginia with a bill saying we can't do it. Here we are, looking foolish."

The measure is largely symbolic, supporters concede, since federal laws generally trump those enacted by states.

But "we made a strong statement today," said Del. Todd Gilbert (R-15th District). Beyond the personal liberties issue, he said, "we don't believe what they tell us in Washington when they say it's going to cut costs or reduce our deficit. We think that's absolutely ridiculous."

But laborer Calvin Faulk, who has a pre-existing medical condition, said Virginia shouldn't kick health care reform to the curb. "I'm in a position where I don't even have health care. If Virginia is going to block me from trying to acquire health care . . . it's sad."

Mike Hurley, who owns a local business, is pleased legislators just said no. "I don't think the federal government should force me to buy anything."

Hurley proudly noted Virginia's motto, Sic Semper Tyrannis (Thus Always To Tyrants). "And when the federal government becomes tyrants,' he said, "we throw them off."

Pages

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-10-2010
Fri, 03-12-2010 - 5:49pm
Okay...then when health care reform passes, Virginia can opt out. I'm sure the citizens will really like that. ;-)

~OPAL~

~OPAL~   onoz_omg2.gif OMG ONOZ image by KILLER_BOB11694

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Fri, 03-12-2010 - 6:09pm

I live in Virginia, and find this quite sad. My employer's health insurance costs go up every year. They've already cut out all subsidies to family coverage, and I gather it won't be too much longer before they're forced to reduce and eventually eliminate subsidies to employee coverage too. I know that with the current plan, I can probably afford to pay the rates, but I know families in our organization that are already hurting from the changes.

And, let's be honest, that is not unusual for the entire area. Employers hate giving up health insurance subsidies because it makes them less competitive with the government employers in the area, but few are able to continue with the insurance rates rising as they have.

I'm lucky. I can get coverage from my husband's USDA plan, but there are few in my organization who have the same options. Tell me, do you pay for your health insurance, or does your employer?

The 3 Day

Sandy
iVillage Member
Registered: 09-10-2009
Fri, 03-12-2010 - 6:26pm

Okay...then when health care reform passes, Virginia can opt out. I'm sure the citizens will really like that. ;-)


So long as I can opt out of all the tax increases resulting from the current proposed plan, I would be happy to opt out.


Insurance rates in VA aren't as high as many other states

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-10-2009
Fri, 03-12-2010 - 6:36pm

I live in Virginia, and find this quite sad. My employer's health insurance costs go up every year. They've already cut out all subsidies to family coverage, and I gather it won't be too much longer before they're forced to reduce and eventually eliminate subsidies to employee coverage too. I know that with the current plan, I can probably afford to pay the rates, but I know families in our organization that are already hurting from the changes.


Tell em to shop around for a high-deductible HSA type plan.

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-28-2010
Fri, 03-12-2010 - 6:52pm

I rarely need to go to the doctor,


Count your Blessings.....


iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Fri, 03-12-2010 - 7:01pm

I don't know where you live, but in the DC area, doctor appointments even for simple maintenance care can be quite expensive. Back when I paid out of pocket for it almost 20 years ago, I paid over $100 a year just to see my GYN for a regular pap. All my other doctor appointments were to a family practice doctor, and most visits were a minimum of $50. This was if all the doctor did was write a scrip and did not include the cost of prescriptions nor the cost of any tests run.

I don't really know exactly what is paid for most of my doctor appointments on the free market now, since I only know my co-pay and the amount the insurance company is willing to pay. I do know when a billing error occurred, I received a $500 bill from my cardiologist, who I only see once every 3 years. That appointment only included an echocardiogram, an EKG, and a discussion with the doc. I also pay out of pocket entirely for my podiatrist, who because she doesn't deal with insurance companies does spend more time with her patients. She's $100 per visit, $400 for orthotics.

My husband and I make good money and have no children, so we don't have much to worry about right now. As we get older, these concerns will become greater before we become eligible for medicare. We'll see more doctors more often, receive more treatments, and we might still be able to afford it with a high deductible plan. But as is stated time and time again, even with low deductible plans, families are often just one medical emergency away from bankruptcy. Is this a good thing?

The 3 Day

Sandy
iVillage Member
Registered: 09-10-2009
Fri, 03-12-2010 - 7:41pm

I don't know where you live, but in the DC area, doctor appointments even for simple maintenance care can be quite expensive. Back when I paid out of pocket for it almost 20 years ago, I paid over $100 a year just to see my GYN for a regular pap. All my other doctor appointments were to a family practice doctor, and most visits were a minimum of $50. This was if all the doctor did was write a scrip and did not include the cost of prescriptions nor the cost of any tests run.


I'm a Restonian.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Sat, 03-13-2010 - 12:47am

>I'm a Restonian. How bout you ?
We're only talking about once a year, at a combined cost of $150-$200 (depending on the negotiated rate with the insurance co.), and whether or not extra tests are needed. Not unreasonable<

Fairfax here. Again, I can afford these rates if needed, but I don't have children. But it's also more than once or twice a year. I have to go in for the annual physical, mammography (sister had breast cancer), any necessary followups on the mammogram, every 3 years to a cardiologist, every year or so to the podiatrist (depending on state of feet). Plus possible illness, like migraines that can't be treated with OTC meds, whatever. And of course the twice annual dental checkups (xrays once per year, bitewings every 5), and eyecare (once a year or so). The costs for all these is probably closer to $1000.

Yes, I think my podiatric care is reasonably priced, but that's because I specifically elected for an out of service provider when the in service providers wouldn't take my pain seriously. And I can deduct my orthotics as a business expense due to my dance business. (It helps.)

I understand your feelings about the bankruptcy statement, but when something like 60% of all bankruptcies are now linked to medical bills (2007 data), it has to make you wonder.

The 3 Day

Sandy
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-14-2010
Sat, 03-13-2010 - 1:12am

"but when something like 60% of all bankruptcies are now linked to medical bills (2007 data), it has to make you wonder."


What was it? Something like $12-18K worth of medical bills? Hardly enough IMO to push someone into bankruptcy all by itself..


iVillage Member
Registered: 03-13-2010
Sat, 03-13-2010 - 2:43am
The first shot on Lexington green.

Pages