A sneaky way to get the unemploment roll

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-10-2008
A sneaky way to get the unemploment roll
12
Wed, 03-31-2010 - 9:46am

Here is political trickster's at work. If you or anyone you know is on unemployment pay attention!
But now Ms. Hanson rues the day she took that work. Why? The Connecticut Department of Labor used her negligible earnings in her part-time job as the new baseline for Hanson's unemployment benefits. She went from receiving $483 a week to getting nothing.

"Afterwards, unofficially, they said I shouldn’t have taken the job," Hanson says.
It's a twist in the law that may affect thousands of other workers, given that the ranks of the long-term unemployed are now so high. Many people who have been out of work for a year are picking up work as temps or part-timers, unaware that state agencies will recalculate their unemployment benefits after a year – and use their most recent work history and pay level to do it.

"What is going on for these workers is that because their most recent wages are much lower than the wages they earned in their prior full-time job, they are facing substantial cuts in their weekly unemployment benefits," says George Wentworth, a consultant at the National Employment Law Project (NELP) in New York.

Benefits recalculated after a year

WOW and they are gone from the rolls to be seen bake on welfare!!

http://news.yahoo.com/s/csm/20100329/ts_csm/291284

Your legislatures keeping lawyers working since 1776

xvza

Hornycomments.com for myspace adult comments

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iVillage Member
Registered: 01-02-2010
Wed, 03-31-2010 - 1:30pm
How long can unemployment benefits last? 22 months seems a bit long, doesn't it? i thought that benefits only lasted 12 months max. does anyone know about this? i thought CT used to deduct the amount that you made at your part time job from your unemployment to extend it out. that is what i recall from a friend that was on unemployment there, but that was 18 years ago. (so if you had $450 benefit, made $200 at your p/t job you would get the $250 difference). I know it varies from state to state, but what is the national average for length of benefits?
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-10-2008
Wed, 03-31-2010 - 7:40pm
The article was referring to the extensions that are in place because of the depression. Many people will not be going back to their old jobs or old occupations. The article relates that the way benefits are calculated is another of the problem.

Your legislatures keeping lawyers working since 1776

xvza

Hornycomments.com for myspace adult comments
iVillage Member
Registered: 01-02-2010
Wed, 03-31-2010 - 8:49pm
i realize that, but i am still wondering what most states have for a max time for benefits.
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-10-2008
Thu, 04-01-2010 - 2:00am
States usually have 26 weeks but the federal extension is enforce.
The fact is most will not get their old jobs back. Right now there is not enough positions open or enough money for training. Not only that the whole system is obsolete.
The training does need to be federal as there is a conflict of interest when the states get into this as the state is looking for "local" conditions rather than national or international.

Your legislatures keeping lawyers working since 1776

xvza

Hornycomments.com for myspace adult comments
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Sat, 04-03-2010 - 2:01pm

I'm going to sound perhaps heartless for this but these folks are very probably in job fields where they cannot expect to ever regain employment either in that field and/or at that same pay level again. If they can get work as part-timers and/or temps, they are not truly unemployed anymore and thus it is only right for those agencies to make those recalculations.

I've been unemployed before, in the sense that I had no full-time employment. Never once have I applied for unemployment though, and I made do with the wages I made at 2 or 3 part-time jobs. Perhaps they should be learning to live with less.

The 3 Day

Sandy
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-10-2008
Sat, 04-03-2010 - 6:03pm

The point is that if they had known about this change they would not have wasted their time and money. The system is much nastier so when a person loses out the bills keep coming and it may not be possible to find as many parttime jobs where they live. Yes many did as I did 3 jobs and going to college. However,I was not needing to make as much as I would now. It does not make economic sense. We are talking having enough money to live on. Today the banks are not going to give anyone a break,the rent still needs to be paid etc. To make matters worse re-training is often a joke. Because those services are run by the states they are not national in scope. A person will have problems if the local job market is saturated.

There used to be an America where people helped people. Where they cheered the others success. Today we are like dogs in the manger.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Dog_in_the_Manger

Your legislatures keeping lawyers working since 1776

xvza

Hornycomments.com for myspace adult comments
iVillage Member
Registered: 09-07-2009
Sat, 04-03-2010 - 9:52pm
We all need to start spending less, saving more.
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Sun, 04-04-2010 - 10:27pm

> However,I was not needing to make as much as I would now. It does not make economic sense. We are talking having enough money to live on. Today the banks are not going to give anyone a break,the rent still needs to be paid etc.<
And so it is for those who worked hard at part-time, low-paying jobs before this recession. I am sorry, but to tell those people who work hard that their difficulties in paying rent and medical bills before this recession that their needs are less than those who lost their jobs and must now take lower paying (but still probably higher paying than the working poor) is rather distasteful to me.

Many of the jobs lost were jobs that were going away before the recession, and the recession just hastened the end for jobs in the automobile industry and other professions. These individuals should have seen the end coming, yet chose instead to rely on GM, Ford, and Chrysler to continue to provide their jobs.

If I lost my job, I'd have to learn to do with less. So will they.

The 3 Day

Sandy
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-10-2008
Mon, 04-05-2010 - 12:58am
The article was to warn those on emergence extension NOT to take low pay part of temp jobs. The formula is what they have make in the last 4 quarters. The problem is that many took the parttime jobs in hope of extending there benefits until a full time full time along. The shock is is losing 400USD per week! Because they did not know that while on extension the income counted toward unemployment is what they made on that part time job Some people received nothing.

Your legislatures keeping lawyers working since 1776

xvza

Hornycomments.com for myspace adult comments
iVillage Member
Registered: 12-15-2009
Mon, 04-05-2010 - 2:34am

40% of Tea Partiers are Dems and Independents, How Will Media Report the News?


For almost a year, the mainstream media have depicted members of the Tea Party movement as racist, right-wing extremists.

On Sunday, a survey was released finding 40 percent of Tea Partiers are Democrats and Independents.


Given the media's hatred for everyone involved in this growing movement, how will they react to and report this startling revelation released hours ago by The Hill (h/t Pat Dollard):



The national breakdown of the Tea Party composition is 57 percent Republican, 28 percent Independent and 13 percent Democratic, according to three national polls by the Winston Group, a Republican-leaning firm that conducted the surveys on behalf of an education advocacy group. Two-thirds of the group call themselves conservative, 26 are moderate and 8 percent say they are liberal.


The group is united around two issues – the economy/jobs and reducing the deficit. They believe that cutting spending is the key to job creation and favor tax cuts as the best way to stimulate the economy. That said 61 percent of Tea Party members believe infrastructure spending creates jobs. Moreover, given the choice Tea Party members favor 63-32 reducing unemployment to 5 percent over balancing the budget.

Here are some findings media might find agreeable:



The group also vehemently dislikes President Barack Obama – even more so than those who called themselves Republicans in the survey. Over 80 percent of Tea Party members disapprove of the job he’s doing as president, whereas 77 percent of Republican respondents said they disapprove of Obama. The Tea Party members are also strongly opposed to the Democrats’ healthcare plan, with 82 percent saying they oppose it --

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