Republicans "all in" against Hispanics

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-24-2010
Republicans "all in" against Hispanics
145
Wed, 04-28-2010 - 9:47pm

Palin and the radical Republicans are "all in" against hispanics in supporting the Arizona immigration law.

This is the same law that says Mexican looking people can be pulled over based on a new unconstitutional standard of "reasonable" suspicion. It goes even further and says that citizen activists can sue law enforcement officials for not pulling people over based on this unconstitutional standard.

There is a reason that at least one prominent Arizona sheriff say he will not enforce this law. There is a reason that former Republican Homeland Security Chief Tom Ridge is not comfortable with the law.

There is a reason even Republican svengali Karl Rove is having second thoughts. Karl knows hispanic voters he spent years pandering to are rightfully going to say thanks but no thanks to Republicans over this.

Karl also knows that independent voters will have serious doubts about Republicans over this, and that the measure will drive Democrats to the polls to enable reform.

This hateful unconstitutional law that Palin and the Republicans have gotten behind will have a just effect on their ability to convince people to vote for them this fall.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 10-28-2009
Fri, 04-30-2010 - 7:56am

Kris Kobach, author of the bill.

http://www2.ljworld.com/news/2010/apr/28/kobach-getting-paid-train-arizona-sheriffs-departm/?utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=twitter

Kobach getting paid to train Arizona sheriff’s department on how to arrest suspected illegal immigrants
Secretary of state candidate earning $300 an hour in Ariz.

By Scott Rothschild

April 28, 2010, 5:32 p.m. Updated April 29, 2010, 8:39 a.m.

Topeka — Republican secretary of state candidate Kris Kobach not only helped write Arizona’s new immigration law, but he has been working for $300 per hour to train law enforcement officers there on procedures in arresting suspected illegal immigrants.

Kobach, an attorney, was hired as an immigration expert to help the Maricopa County sheriff’s office in immigration enforcement activities and policy. The contract, signed in October, calls for a minimum payment to Kobach of $1,500 per month, plus expenses and travel.

The new state law in Arizona, which Kobach helped put together, has been under fire from civil rights advocates, President Obama and even some Republican politicians.

The law says anyone police suspect of being in the country illegally must produce proof of being in the country lawfully or face arrest.

Critics say the law will result in people being targeted by law enforcement because of their skin color or language.

But Kobach says the criticism is off base and that the law prohibits racial profiling.

His contract with Maricopa County deals with training deputies under Sheriff Joe Arpaio on arrest procedures under federal immigration law. Arpaio, who is considering a run for governor, has been criticized by some for improper tactics in cracking down on illegal immigration.

Kobach’s help on the new state immigration law in Arizona was done for free, he said.

“I want these states to draft laws that will stand up in court,” he said.

He also has written local ordinances dealing with illegal immigration in Hazelton, Pa., and Farmers Branch, Texas.

Kobach said he was asked to help out on the Arizona law by state Sen. Russell Pearce, a Republican from Mesa, Ariz.

Kobach described Pearce as a friend. Pearce has been a controversial figure in Arizona politics.

In 2006, Pearce sent an e-mail to supporters in which he copied an article from a white separatist group.

The article from the National Alliance’s website criticized the media for promoting multiculturalism, racial equality and presenting the Jewish Holocaust as fact. Pearce said he didn’t know the entire contents of the article and when he became aware of them he apologized and said they didn’t represent his views.

Of Pearce, Kobach said, “I know him as a person who has never said anything that indicated any kind of racial bias. He’s a very good man.”

Kobach is a former Kansas Republican Party chairman, and a law professor at University of Missouri-Kansas City. From 2001 to 2003, he served as the chief adviser on immigration law to then-U.S. Attorney General John Ashcroft.

Kobach is senior counsel for the Immigration Law Reform Institute, which describes itself as representing “citizens experiencing injury resulting from illegal immigration.”

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-03-2009
Fri, 04-30-2010 - 8:09am

The

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-03-2009
Fri, 04-30-2010 - 8:15am

LOL.

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-25-2006
Fri, 04-30-2010 - 8:18am

<>

Partial explanation: Bush is a white Republican and Obama is a dark-skinned Democrat. I think your later post about Kobach's friendship with Pearce, a white separatist fan, supports the accusation of racism.

There is one other reason, though. Remember, the GOP is all about protecting business and corporations. Without the cheap labor provided by illegals, the GOP's donor base would suffer. See the GOP wants to be able to exploit the Hispanics, and then deport them when they get sick of them. And American businesses complain about foreign corps' exploitation of human factors. Seesh!

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http://www.pnhp.org/news/2009/october/meet_the_new_health_.php

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DQTBYQlQ7yM

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-28-2009
Fri, 04-30-2010 - 8:18am

>>

Nothing like a little personal attack to brighten someone's day. See ya.

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-28-2009
Fri, 04-30-2010 - 8:35am

Sorry, popping back in just to show you that maybe someone else besides me needs to take those blinders off. CNS never did change their article, even when the NEJM had to post that it was clearly false. "Shoddy journalism"? Hehehe.

http://www.cnsnews.com/news/article/62812

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-03-2009
Fri, 04-30-2010 - 9:11am

Did I mention the NEJM article?

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-28-2009
Fri, 04-30-2010 - 9:25am

<>

To not read something from a clearly rotten source that doesn't care about reporting truth...clearly speaks about my need to read factual information. ;-)

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-03-2009
Fri, 04-30-2010 - 9:35am

Please point out was was not factual in my article.

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-28-2009
Fri, 04-30-2010 - 9:49am

<>

A news source with integrity prints clarifications/retractions when it has been found that they have printed something blatantly false. CNS couldn't be bothered. Therefore, I can't be bothered to read any article coming from them because there is not a reasonable expectation that will be truthful in what they are reporting and there is a reasonable expectation that they will make things up to make their point.

<>

LOL! Yes, that would be true for some. Not for me.

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