the right to health

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-14-2010
the right to health
260
Thu, 08-19-2010 - 12:36pm
Question. Why do you think health care is a right? If you do, then doesn't that right extend to people in utero and to the 85 year olds? Or just to those who contribute to society?

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iVillage Member
Registered: 05-14-2010
Fri, 08-20-2010 - 11:55pm
Im not sure medical care can ensure any sort of a lifespan.
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Fri, 08-20-2010 - 11:57pm

Where did you get the figure that it's going to cost you $600-800/month?

I don't know about you, but until recently my employer offered health insurance for all employees at no cost to the employee. This fall we start paying 20% of the cost because the costs for my employer have become too much to continue to offer as a free benefit to us. If my employer is feeling that crunch, I'm sure others are as well.

Sandy
Sandy
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Sat, 08-21-2010 - 12:04am

There are many potential ways in which a pregnancy can put a woman's life at risk. And certainly her long-term health. Therefore, such decisions are something that are for a woman and her doctor to decide and not legislators or voters who really have nothing at stake.

And, as I pointed out, extending that same right to life to the unborn would bring in question all the forms of birth control that aren't simple barrier methods.

Sandy
Sandy
iVillage Member
Registered: 08-19-2010
Sat, 08-21-2010 - 12:11am

>>> Then why do people say that there is a right to public education?

Education isn't a right, it's a compulsion.

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-14-2010
Sat, 08-21-2010 - 12:18am

"Where did you get the figure that it's going to cost you $600-800/month?"


That's the projected rate once all the new coverages insurance companies are required to cover are added in.

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-19-2010
Sat, 08-21-2010 - 12:18am

>>> Except one can never argue that gun ownership is a basic human right, but that access to safe food, clean water, and health care are necessary to that basic right to life.

Gun ownership is a basic human right as it facilitates the defense and sustenance of our unalienable rights.

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-19-2010
Sat, 08-21-2010 - 12:25am
Can a "right" be forced on you?
iVillage Member
Registered: 08-19-2010
Sat, 08-21-2010 - 12:29am
We don't have a "true democracy"...and the results of the 2008 Presidential election proved the "educated populous" thing is a fallacy. ; )
iVillage Member
Registered: 08-19-2010
Sat, 08-21-2010 - 3:00am

>>> There are many potential ways in which a pregnancy can put a woman's life at risk. And certainly her long-term health. Therefore, such decisions are something that are for a woman and her doctor to decide and not legislators or voters who really have nothing at stake.

First, you're not seriously going to claim that the majority of abortions are performed to save the life of the woman? Are you? Really? Or even make the just as ridiculous claim that most women actually make the decision to abort their children after consulting their doctors? Good, there is no point in taking this discussion into the realm of the absurd. But to be clear, I was speaking of the norm, not the extraordinary...and since pregnancy doesn't normally threaten a woman's life, abortion should be reserved ONLY for those instances in which a woman's life is actually threatened by the pregnancy, and not used as a method of birth control for a woman's convenience.

>>> And, as I pointed out, extending that same right to life to the unborn would bring in question all the forms of birth control that aren't simple barrier methods.

So? The right to life supersedes an imagined "right to convenience"

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-25-2006
Sat, 08-21-2010 - 9:07am

<>

I don't like the individual mandate either, but if you think long and hard about it, you'll come to the same realization to which many of us have come: With the advances in medicine we have today, an individual mandate is required for any insurance system to work.

1) "The average health care expense in 2002 was $11089 per year for elderly people but only $3352 per year for working-age people (ages 19-64)". http://www.ahrq.gov/research/ria19/expendria.htm

We NEED Medicare because many seniors are unable to work, have insufficient income to purchase full-price (without insurance discounts) health care, and for those on Medicare payments have been made into the trust fund by the recipients or their families.

Furthermore, many do not have retiree health care benefits, as we've become a more corporatist nation with short-term focus, with profits taking priority over all else, and with employees valued less as a means to reach profit goals.

2)We cannot afford the high costs required to treat the elderly, yet our society rejects euthanasia, with which many blinder-wearing conservatives equate living wills.

3) The only solution is to require the young and healthy to purchase health insurance. If we were a nation of 100% private insurance it would be required, just as it is with our mixed public-private system. Even if there were no gov't programs, the private insurance premiums would skyrocket if all those senior were in private plans. The insurance lobbyists would be begging Congress to mandate individual health insurance, just as they did with the most recent reform bill.

4)Either we dump our seniors, or we require an individual mandate.

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http://www.pnhp.org/news/2009/october/meet_the_new_health_.php

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DQTBYQlQ7yM

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