Oh, Susana!

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-19-2003
Oh, Susana!
2
Tue, 11-18-2008 - 4:32pm

Hmm, susana, if your stories just poop out, you might not have the plan you think you had. ;-) Do you outline? (I don't as a rule.) Do you have the end in mind when you start? Sometimes I write the last sentence - or two - about the same time I write the first paragraph. It's really hard to make a journey if you don't know your destination.


Going from romance to mystery isn't such a surprise. Stories often morph genres once we get hit in the head with the theme. My mysteries have grabbed romantic subplots even though I can't - won't - write romance. The subplots just happened, just belonged.


Let's keep talking, susana. I'm enjoying this conversation and may be learning more than you. ;-)

JudyB







JudyB






iVillage Member
Registered: 11-17-2008
In reply to: cl_judy_bee
Wed, 11-19-2008 - 9:03am

I'm not used to talking about my writing so I'm not sure what you could learn! ;)

I usually don't outline but what I've been working on has been roaming so much I figured I'd never get anything done if I didn't force myself to nail stuff down. I have so many scraps written that go all over the story, which is fine with me, but a lot of them contradict each other. Does that make sense? I felt I just needed to decide which way the plot was going to go and at least try to stick with that direction.

Lately, though, I've been spending more time on the outline rather than the story itself.

I think I feel more strongly about certain scenes and write them well. But in between, on parts that should move the story to those scenes, I get muddy.

What are you working on?

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-19-2003
In reply to: cl_judy_bee
Wed, 11-19-2008 - 3:43pm

Currently, susana, I'm writing cookbooks and personal essays. They don't need plot but they do need structure.


When writing fiction, I tend to write in chronological order. Of course, once the first draft is completed, there are times when scenes must be plugged between existing ones or existing scenes need more something either to add details or just to add words. My first mystery came up almost 15,000 words short of what it should have been. I added a little here and a little more there then inserted an entire chapter about three-quarters of the way through. That chapter added to the plot and shed more light on the main characters. But it was hard work.


You certainly made sense when talking about scraps of your story contradicting each other. That's why I just write beginning to end and never jump ahead of myself. Even then, some things don't work together - and characters change eye color as often as their shoes. That's why we must go over everything once we're done. Rewriting is best done once the whole work is written. We can see the whole story before us and make changes on what we have and not what we think we might have. ;-)


Some writers I know use index cards (instead of an outline). The idea is to have mini versions of scenes to access quickly and

JudyB