2 part question/ process & variety

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Registered: 02-21-2006
2 part question/ process & variety
8
Sun, 05-17-2009 - 11:30pm

I was wondering if you guys would share your process. I know for the most part it boils down to what ever works for each individual but I am always curious about the nuances of how we all get from point A to point B. I like the word count quota idea and the muse as Devon mentioned. Wealth of information in your article but wondered about everyone elses work habits.

Also, I do love the concept of devoting 120 days to finishing a project but how many of you have many projects open at one time. So far I am finding that i am most productive in regular life if I allow myself to mix it up and have several major endeavors going on and then go with one until i reach some natural stopping point or it gets stagnant. Then step away from that one while it simmers and pick up another that was waiting in the wings and so on and so forth until it all cycles around again. Not methodical but if I stick to one thing and try to just push on it is really hard. Maybe i just have to push through but I really seem to do better work and it flows nicely if i allow the change ups. Do you find you keep several things going and bounce around as one cooks and another fires up? Also, I am guessing that when one project get to a point of carrying a lot of momentum it might take over completely for while coming down the home stretch. that would seem naturally but i have never gotten that far before. LOL let's just say the article on finishing non deadline projects spoke volumes to me. lol

just a few questions, thanks

hugs
Sher



Go with the flow of good chaos

hugs
Sher



Go with the flow of good chaos


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Registered: 07-03-2004
Mon, 05-18-2009 - 6:46am

I think it also largely depends on what kind of writing you're doing.

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Writing Blog |

Avatar for avihockey
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Registered: 03-26-2003
Mon, 05-18-2009 - 12:02pm

I tend to use the word count quota. It's the best way I've found to actually hold myself accountable. That said, I lack the means to write full time and with a full time job, 1000 words a day is not typically possible for me; when things are really busy, I actually try to hold myself to 1000 words a week for the novel. I've tried writing a chapter a week, but I can find it hard to push out something as fully formed as a chapter

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Registered: 03-19-2003
Mon, 05-18-2009 - 3:12pm

Devon's article was extremely helpful and motivating, wasn't it?


Self-entertainment has been my prime motivation for fiction more than I care to admit. It's hard to sell a novel when the sole audience is the author. Hmm. Maybe that's why my daughter says I write the world's longest outlines. My stories, long or short, must be rewritten for a larger audience. They should feel as if they were written for you and not me. Of course, since my brain moves in mysterious ways, I usually have several fiction WIPs in the works. If I don't want to move into a future society, I might feel like killing someone (brah-ha-ha!) or turning that yard filled with a lawn made of weeds and dead branches into a field of flowers (sometimes I really do feel like that). There's a make-believe world to slip into whatever my mood.


Real life hasn't been much fun lately but I've always loved research. My current project, the infamous cookbook, has tons of research attached to it, not the least of which is experimenting with recipes. It's fun! It's useful. It's usually quite tasty. (Gotta take the thyme out of that taco casserole and add some cinnamon!) Helping equip a kitchen on the cheap took lots of notes from research. I've been able to feed us on only sale items

JudyB






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Registered: 03-19-2003
Mon, 05-18-2009 - 3:45pm

This could be the most logical way to approach a novel, Linda.


That's what I did with my first two finished manuscripts. ('Course, I haven't done much with them since.)


Staying focused is a good thing.

JudyB







JudyB






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Registered: 03-19-2003
Mon, 05-18-2009 - 4:31pm

Love your "Loosey-Goosey" folder, Ada! I keep my list in a little fat spiral book that's usually in my purse. Since I'm never too far from my purse, it's always handy.


The Writing Life helps keep me honest even though

JudyB






Avatar for avihockey
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Registered: 03-26-2003
Thu, 05-21-2009 - 8:55am

In general, I'm writing articles on spec -- but like you say, I'd much rather have a contract in front of me! I've actually found that many of the markets I'm interested in writing prefer to be queried with complete articles. Because I'm not relying on my articles to put food on my table, I'm okay with writing something first and then seeing what happens. If I get shot down the first couple times,

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Registered: 03-19-2003
Thu, 05-21-2009 - 4:35pm

Clips are great to have, Ada, but many writers start out without any. I had a fiction background when I got that food gig. I might feed my characters too much and too often (with too much detail) but I don't make up stories about food. Food's serious stuff.


Of course, I did have that pre-teen big-time newspaper gig under my belt. Guess that proved I could hit a deadline and knew how to construct a sentence. ;-)


If a writer has no clips, the query usually just ignores that paragraph of the sell. That gives you a bit more room to prove your idea and your expertise is just what they need.


Keep your mind open to reworking your spec pieces to something an editor's been looking for, Ada, and you may end up with a big box filled with clips.

JudyB







JudyB






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Registered: 09-12-2005
Thu, 05-28-2009 - 9:23am

My blog, Ink in My Coffee, deals with my daily writing process (http://devonellington.wordpress.com). If you read through a week or so worth of posts, you get an idea.

Since I make my living writing, I always have several projects going at once.

I write my first 1K of the day in the morning, after yoga, but before anything else. Then I switch between projects according to deadline and payment -- the highest paid project with the tightest deadline gets first priority.

I write fiction, non-fiction, scripts, business writing -- pretty much everything, so I have to reshuffle the priorities every day.

But that first 1K in the morning is the most important, before I'm "tainted by the day."

Right now, I'm working on two projects in the morning, so instead of 1K, I'm averaging about 2500 words, which is what I'd normally do during Nano, but spread out over 2 projects. I'm developing a new serial at 50K, so I'm doing at least 1500 words/day on that, and then I've got another novel that's averaging about 1K.

I also have a couple of plays commissioned, and I'm working on the third Jain Lazarus book. Plus juggling client projects with short turnaournds.

My middle grade mystery just released, so I'm on the PR bandwagon fro that.

And you have to keep marketing, especially when you're really busy, so there aren't fallow periods.

I consider both my blog and Twitter part of my job. They've brought in a lot of paying work, so I can't lag on them, either.

Ink in My Coffee: http://devonellington.wordpress.com Hex Breaker: http://hexbreaker.devonellingtonwork.com www.fearlessink.com www.devonellingtonwork.com