Agent Speak?

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-19-2003
Agent Speak?
6
Wed, 04-14-2010 - 6:00pm

Is it code? Is it shorthand? While looking for cookbook agents, I spied a collection of phrases I hoped included cookbooks - women's interest, women's non-fiction, lifestyle. Some got specific with words like cooking and food. It seemed almost as if an agent was giving writers a gift if he said he represented cookbooks!


I wonder why, when trying to be so nonspecific on the topics of these books, agents seem to lump cookbooks (if I read the code correctly) in non-fiction interesting women alone. Do men, in addition to refusing to ask for directions, avoid cookbooks? I doubt it. Furry Murray left me several cookbooks, not all given to him by me. My son-in-law has put cookbooks on his Christmas list. I'm writing a cookbook for my grandson. Real men not only eat quiche but they occasionally

JudyB






iVillage Member
Registered: 07-03-2004
In reply to: cl_judy_bee
Thu, 04-15-2010 - 6:50am
I think, where you see an agent who specifies cookbook, they really are interested in cookbooks--that's something they like to sell. With women's interest, that's an agent who's interested in a broader range of topics for women than includes cookbooks (i.e., family, health, etc.). The women's market is huge, so it isn't a surprise that the agents are look for books that would be good for that market. Though I wouldn't be surprised if the agent using the boarder title was looking for best sellers or previously published writers (for example, if I see an agent that says he wants a novelist to have a platform, I've begun interpreting that as 'already published'); while the one with the specifics is looking for something that's going to catch his interest more.

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Writing Blog |

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-07-2004
In reply to: cl_judy_bee
Thu, 04-15-2010 - 7:37am

I know a few writers who have agents. There are not a lot of agents who can make any money just selling cookbooks so they probably have a range of non fiction that appeals to women and that includes cookbooks. Women do most of the book buying in just about every category. Also as far as agents have relationships with publishers and other agents - a lot of book agents work with other agents who sell oversea rights or film rights or aspects of agenting that they dont do. It is also an agents job to have relationships with certain editors and publishing companies so they know where to send the material. It doesnt mean that there is any money changing hands between them - agents make money when they sell so they have to do everything they can and create every relationship they can that will get the book sold in the biggest market.
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-19-2003
In reply to: cl_judy_bee
Thu, 04-15-2010 - 8:30am

Good points, Linda.


Having a platform is much more than being published. (see http://www.writersdigest.com/article/how-to-build-a-marketing-platform/

JudyB






iVillage Member
Registered: 03-19-2003
In reply to: cl_judy_bee
Thu, 04-15-2010 - 10:04am

Barlan, I realize that agents need relationships with publishers and

JudyB






iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-2007
In reply to: cl_judy_bee
Sat, 04-17-2010 - 10:51pm
You COULD write a cookbook just for men. You could title it "Stud Muffin Cooking"
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-19-2003
In reply to: cl_judy_bee
Sun, 04-18-2010 - 3:51pm

Love it, Wanda!!!


A chef friend suggested a follow-up to my cooking-for-one compilation - cooking for widowers with little kitchen experience. Since I'm in Florida, most of my audience could be found without even crossing the street. I was thinking of something like "First You Put in the Corn Flakes, Then You Add the Milk."


I like your title much better. Bet the readers wouldn't mind being known as Stud Muffins. LOL!

JudyB







JudyB