Time Wasters

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-19-2003
Time Wasters
2
Fri, 05-21-2010 - 8:51am

Just read an article that reported the average office worker checks e-mail 50 times a day! They also IM 77 times daily. When do they have time to work?


What work? When do they have time to play online games, text and call friends on their cell phones, tweet and check Facebook?


With all this going on, companies are probably paying overtime to get anything accomplished. Employees play all day, look like they're working by checking e-mail when someone walks by, then get down to business at a 50% self-given raise until it's time to meet someone for drinks or dinner (something they can afford with their inflated paychecks.) Do I sound bitter? You're darned right I'm bitter. The economy's in the toilet and I can't even find a job opportunity to try for - and I work when I should and save play for later.


Now that my rant is over, it's time to ask how your social life affects your writing life. Do you take phone calls or let them go to voicemail? Do you play games on Facebook when the words won't come?


That article went on to what happens to your brain when your train of thought gets derailed. It's scary.

JudyB







JudyB






iVillage Member
Registered: 07-03-2004
In reply to: cl_judy_bee
Sat, 05-22-2010 - 12:47pm

I don't like articles like this--they sensationalize one part of the story and ignore the other part of the story. There are bosses out there who think every minute of every day should be for work--treating people like they're robots. They become greatly disturbed when people socialize, because they're not working, and therefore not being productive. We're not robots, so there is some social aspect that's necessary.

Emails: Again, one side only. People may be checking it fifty times a day because the expectation is that they are "responsive." I mean, what do you do when someone sends you an email and then comes over in panic ten minutes later because you haven't responded? That's happened to me. When I set up conference rooms, I would regularly get people sending me the slides to show five minutes before the meeting. They expected me to see my email at the same time I was setting up the meeting. And we'd see the same thing with a meeting cancellation--goes out five minutes before the meeting, and the coordinator expects all the attendees to see the email.

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If it's someone I know, yes, I will stop. I use the caller ID to filter it, given I get my share of telemarketing calls (Verizon is a huge culprit; they call me once a day, every single day). There is one person I will screen out if I'm writing because I cannot get myself off the phone with her in under two hours.

But the calls are not distracting to me the way they are to other people. I do better when I can hop from thing to thing--I can easily get bored working on one thing for many hours.

<>

Absolutely not. People keep inviting me to those games, and I keep turning them down. I was on Twitter briefly. Mike Hyatt, the CEO of Thomas Nelson, said on his blog that my reasons for not getting involved with Twitter wasn't realistic--time. I tried Twitter, and time was the reason I bailed on it. It looks like it isn't time consuming, but I was having to come up with 6-8 tweets a day, plus participate in other tweets. It was extremely time consuming, and the time was better served for writing, or hopping to something else. I like blogs and FaceBook much better because I don't have to participate constantly. I can just pop in when I feel like and do something.

I do hop over to writing message board sites periodically, but I also only hit specific areas and generally don't spend a lot of time there. The time is also beneficial to me, since I'm often thinking about a writing problem--not just randomly gossiping.

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Writing Blog |

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-19-2003
In reply to: cl_judy_bee
Sat, 05-22-2010 - 9:31pm

I did the math, Linda. If a person checks e-mail 50 times during an eight-hour day, that means they open e-mail every 9.6 minutes. If they need to respond, they better think and key fast. Personally, I blame automation in e-mail programs that announce every new message for the number of times people check them. It's not the worker's fault.


I agree that we need to socialize at work. If we don't, we may feel like a robot and start acting like a robot. I've worked in nose-to-the-grindstone offices and they're not much fun. I've also worked in offices where two or three people are expected to work while everyone else, including the bosses, party non-stop between cigarette breaks and long lunches. Those aren't any fun either for the people

JudyB