Dish on curves please!

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Dish on curves please!
17
Thu, 03-27-2003 - 11:15am
I was looking at the help wanted and saw an add for Curves for exercise techs (with the statement, "we will train you"). Of course, being unemployed and having no idea what I want to do, other than go to the gym, I called. Do we see where this is heading? The owner wants to meet with me, I actually KNOW the girl who is leaving who is leaving, a personal trainer that I met through mine at our gym. Anyway. Knowing nothing about them and being a good little drone I did some research and am unsure if I could actually advocate for this circuit only thing...

So, do any of you know anything about Curves? Have you used them? Do you know anyone who has? They seem to be a good launching point for the very overweight/out of shape and older women who don't know what they are doing. A population I would actually LOVE to work with since I've been there. But, I don't want to waste his (or my) time if I'm going to get there and be disgusted by the system. Though, over the phone I was impressed with their philosophy of healthy living, no restrictive diets, etc. And, apparently I had more enthusiasm about working out than anyone else who has called.

Oh, and thanks for the tips on jobs everyone. I did put in for activities coordinator for the youth corrections facility. I don't want to be a police officer, especially out here. I spent more than 3 years working with abused women and children and low income/special needs care at my last job. I burned out and am scared of the environment. We lost a child in our care and I have never really gotten over that. I was offered a position at CPS last year by one of my professors, which I declined. If push comes to shove I may approach her for a straight admin job, but I can't do front line work anymore. My heart can't take it. There is so much more to this that I won't bore you with, just suffice to say that every child who I find out is abused opens very raw wounds in my heart that just won't heal if picked at daily.


~K~

~Kiervin~

Co-author of:  MONSTER'S INK HORROR ANTHOLOGY By Cyber-Pulp Press

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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-25-2003
Thu, 03-27-2003 - 11:32am
PLEASE don't work for CURVES!!! I know this may seem a bit skewed coming from my POV because I work out at a NON chain all women's gym but I know a few people that have tried them and have been highly disappointed. They are a huge corporation that is based of membership profit and money, not quality.

First of all you are on a weight circut you have a time limit and very little if any cardio. Meaning you can't make your own workout and can't stay as long as you'd like on any machine.

If they train you to be a physical trainer, watch out... many people are not certified to train and only learn what they have been showed on the job. Do you really want to be a cookie cutter? Sorry if this sounds rude but I have very strong feelings on the subject.

Let me know what you decide on though, keep a positive attitude.

Alana

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Thu, 03-27-2003 - 11:44am
Cookie cutter was my fear! That was the feeling that I got from reading thier promo stuff. I would like to make a difference based on my experience, not based on some "program". Does that make sense? If my mind was made up I wouldn't have asked the question. Ethically, I cannot advocate for something that I don't believe in. I wanted to see if anyone had any experience with them for me to pull from because I'm not so sure I could believe in a straight circuit with no control over one's own workout.

I may still meet with him and see what they have to offer. But bottom line is I'm not big on gimmicks and it sounds like a gimmick. Though convincing hubby that I shouldn't take a job is going to get hard since this will be my second refused offer as we struggle to buy this house!

Thanks for the feedback, I'll keep it in mind as I go through this. But it sounds like my internal warning system's flares were on target. Moving carefully.

~K~

~Kiervin~

Co-author of:  MONSTER'S INK HORROR ANTHOLOGY By Cyber-Pulp Press

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-25-2003
Thu, 03-27-2003 - 11:54am
K, There's a message board devoted to people who are members of Curves. You may want to ask the women there how they feel about it. I know the cl on that board and she absolutely LOVES the program. Yes, from the commercials I've seen, it seems to be a facility more targeted at beginners. I would check it out and see for yourself. Also, please stop by the Curves message board and get some first-hand accounts. Good Luck!
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-25-2003
Thu, 03-27-2003 - 1:01pm
i don't know anything about curves but i know it can be tempting to take jobs that are offered to you out of the blue, but i definitely think you are smart to take time to seek out jobs that are more well-suited to you before feeling pressure to take what comes along. if the curves thing is too much of a gimmick, for instance, perhaps a local gym is hiring, or the YMCA...you could still work with beginners and the people you want to work with. perhaps, you could get some free training and if you wanted you could get your personal trainer's certification.

i had some other random job ideas - you are a good writer, ever think of being a reporter? with your degree, you'd be a good person to cover a law or court beat. also, in dc there are programs to teach the basics of law to at risk kids, you know to educate them that they really could ruin their lives if they start doing illegal stuff, maybe there's something like that on your island? plus, there are other educational programs like DARE, though DARE is run by police officers, i don't know if they hire non-officers to work on it. you could find out from your school district, and if there isn't anything like that, you could draft a proposal to the school board to get them to pay you to do it! also, i don't know if you'd find it interesting and/or profitable, but there are a lot of administrative positions connected with the police and the courts - police dispatcher, court clerk, etc. or you could teach at a local college or community college. you could get a job as a paralegal.

what made you pick your major?

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-20-2003
Thu, 03-27-2003 - 2:15pm
I know people who love the program. I agree w/ millcreek about checking out the message board for them. I think it's a good beginning for the older, overweight crowd which are the people I know who like it. They only go 3 days a week for 30 minutes a time. It's a good way to ease into exercising, but I don't think it'll get in you great shape. I have a friend who's been doing it for a few months and I've thought of recommending to her that she try something more intense, but she loves it. I've done a program that's similar. It was a PACE class at an old gym but it was an hour long. It used machines that look like Nautilus machines, with hydrolic presses, instead of weights and had cardio in between, so it was intervals. It was a decent work out but you got what you put in and it would be easy to "cheat" your way through. The trainer makes all the difference in a class like that.





iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Thu, 03-27-2003 - 9:07pm
The original plan was law school. It wasn't until I was two years into the program that I realized that I have no desire to do it. That isn't entirely true, I would love to practice law, I just don't want to go to school anymore! It was also about that time that I first started writing due to constant encouragement by my professors. By then I had completed all but a handful of core classes and some open electives for my degree, to change to journalism would have meant 18 classes instead of 10. Basic math and logic won out, I finished my original degree. My heart says to write, but it won't pay a mortgage payment when hubby retires from the military in a few years, and by then I really should be in a position to support the family since he has done it for the past 14 years.

I think part of the problem is that the media is very much a "who you know" entity. I don't know anyone except the terrific editor and publisher that I write for already. Unfortunately, they only put out one issue every other month.

I'm in this awful spot. My heart says one thing. My experience says another. And my education is in something else entirely. So, I could really go just about anywhere as long as I could live with myself while there. I fired off some emails to a few of my more supportive and connected professors earlier. Hopefully, one of them can give me a lead. Of course, my mentor, the woman who first got me to try my hand at writing, keeps telling me to do the Masters in Military History and Diplomacy program. She's gone so far as to get me pre-acceptance from the program coordinator despite my degree being completely unrelated to it. But, we can't afford two of us in Master's programs right now and I would have to take a gazillion classes because I took the bare bones minimum in history in my undergrad degree.

Right now I'm going to research the heck out of the job market and keep my fingers crossed!

~K~

~Kiervin~

Co-author of:  MONSTER'S INK HORROR ANTHOLOGY By Cyber-Pulp Press

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-20-2003
Fri, 03-28-2003 - 9:39am
I'm kind of going through the same thing, as the kids get older, on what to do when I "grow up". I can't go back to my old job because it's 50-70 hours a week. I don't think I'll ever go back to a desk job, though the pay is unbeatable.

Can you be a teaching assistant or teaching fellow with your masters so you don't have to pay? I had to teach classes for mine, got paid (minimally) but didn't pay tuition which was huge. The other thing is that some states have really low tuition for in-state students, and the new rule is that military spouses pay in-state fees.

Also, have you thought of being a real personal trainer, instead of one for a special program? I've considered something along that line. It's hard when you move all the time, but we're nearing the end of my husband's career (hopefully).






iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Fri, 03-28-2003 - 11:22am
The curves thing was a sidetrack from my considering going into personal training. I had already decided a few weeks ago to work on getting certified because it is so close to my heart. My thought was that it is just one more "license" I can hold and even if I never do it I would have something neat on my resume. I was attracted to the curves ad because they said they would train!


I know what you are saying. Being a military wife means never putting down those roots and never having a job for more than three or four years. We could have stayed in Maine in 97 and I could still be at BBCCS, but it was so emotionally draining that I thank my lucky stars that we got out of there when we did. My entire life has been devoted to supporting the federal government, don't laugh, it's true. My childhood as a navy brat and my time in the military then marrying a military man. I keep wondering if I'm unsuited to civilian life. I also keep checking for federal jobs because of that! Right now I'm going to keep looking and I'm trying to figure out if I should do ACE certification or start with Cooper's since it is less "medically slanted" than ACE is. I have four personal trainers at our gym encouraging me to do this and all telling me to do one or the other!

I think that you should look into it too! It seems that the base gyms are ALWAYS hiring and having a certification would give you that foot in the door. And, I personally think they need more people like you and me, it is well and good that they are employing these "new" younger wives, but we bring the perspective of years of experience and what is needed to support an established "family" in being fit. Gosh, I really should try to talk with the health services coordinator... you have all kinds of wheels turning in my head today!

~K~

~Kiervin~

Co-author of:  MONSTER'S INK HORROR ANTHOLOGY By Cyber-Pulp Press

Avatar for soleilune
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Fri, 03-28-2003 - 2:19pm
Curves is very rigid format-wise, but this is a good thing for some people. From what little I understand about their set up is you do a machine based resistance circuit in a timed group setting. This is fine for people starting out as machines allow them to work the muscles w/out having to focus too much on form. I don't particularly advocate it for anyone w/ experience (unless this is their cup of tea). It's a no brainer workout & you need to change things regularly after the first 3-6 months to avoid hitting a plateau. As to circuit training in general - it's a great workout. The idea behind circuit training is to keep moving. You get a full body resistance workout done at a steady pace resulting in some degree of cardio. Quick & effective. I like it, but that's just me.

As for the job, at least check it out. There's no reason for you to spend the rest of your life there. It will give you a chance to see what it's like to work in this field; experience that looks good on a future resume & it will help w/ the bills until something better comes along. Certification can be expensive & as a rule no more than 30% of those who take the training either complete the process or are teaching/training a year later. (We have five girls on staff at the gym -reception & child care- & one member, who took the certification courses for aerobic instruction. Of those six two didn't finish the process & one has quit teaching as she's just not cut out for it. The other three are just wrapping up the certification process now, so time will tell.) Curves will provide you a practical opportunity to try this type of career on for size. Unfortunately being a trainer/instructor is just as much a matter of personality as knowledge, so why spend money to find out if you like it or not when you could make money at it instead. Be forewarned though, this is not career that's likely to support a family. An instructor can't teach enough to earn an independant living & a trainer needs time & word of mouth to establish themselves sufficiently to turn a buck (even then you won't be getting rich). This is a job that is done for love. I'm not trying to discourage anyone, just making the realities known. The only instructors or trainers I know that don't have a second job outside the business are either retired from another career or a former pro athlete w/ excellent exposure & word of mouth. This is my sole income, but I wouldn't be able to support myself or my family on it if I had too.

Good luck, take care & keep us posted.

Soleilune
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-25-2003
Fri, 03-28-2003 - 2:51pm
i know people who make a living in fitness, but they work in the corporate fitness world...running fitness programs and managing gyms for corporations and other organizations.

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