AHHHH!!!! I need to push myself more!!!

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-20-2003
AHHHH!!!! I need to push myself more!!!
7
Fri, 04-04-2003 - 4:03pm
I can get so lazy about pushing myself sometimes! Setting the April goals was really good for me. I tried to push myself on the elliptical today, instead of my normal routine. I got an okay workout from the normal, but I don't get high enough intensity. I did 30 minutes today, intervals with the high at 16 for 2 minutes, the lows at 10/11 for 2 minutes and it felt great (I was doing about 11/12 and then 9/10). I still think I might be able to do better but I've never pushed myself on it before.

I also finally did two assisted pull-ups with 30 pounds. Wasn't this the point when you can then go to one pull-up at 20 pounds? Well, I can do half of one...but I'm working on it. So, on a roll with seeing how much I can do, I tried military push-ups and did 25. I normally stop at 15, for no good reason other than it just felt like a good number.

I don't know when I started getting complacent and not pushing myself to the max.:-( How did I get so lazy???






iVillage Member
Registered: 03-25-2003
Fri, 04-04-2003 - 4:37pm
oh yeah, you are so lazy, lol!! but that's cool that you had such a great workout and pushed yourself...you are stronger than you thought!
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Fri, 04-04-2003 - 5:32pm
From the motivational guru:

You'll stop pushing yourself and you'll get complacent when you have no "actual goal" to pursue.

That's the problem with "exercise for the sake of exercise itself" - rather than exercising while working to achieve a particular goal. Before any misunderstandings occur...I'm NOT suggesting that anybody go out and pursue ultra-marathon anything so that you're pushed to the limits of physical and mental capacity, so that training is a never ending regime that is carefully monitored and your life is structured around it.

All I'm saying is that you've got to have specific goals for which you're striving to achieve - so that you stop "putting a mark on the calendar as having gone to the gym" while really not getting the full benefit from it - but unfortunately putting your body thru the full impact of it and incurring whatever repeated use injuries or issues will arise at some point.

You haven't got to get extreme....to get goals. If you don't want to run a few local 5K's, and do a few local cycling events (those really aren't races so much as events as a rule), if you're not wanting to attempt a local short triathlon, or some other athletic dedication that you enjoy......you might consider some "unique" options.

If your vacation next year involves climbing and hiking - "train" for that vacation with the stairmaster, the treadmill, your bike, and with weights. If you're responsible at work for organizing a "team motivating event" - try a local university or college that has the 'ropes course' and go out and work thru that course several times solo so that you know how to organize and train for your duties as the motivational coordinator at work.

Pick a passion....and train for it, I guess it what I'm saying. Or pick a goal - and train for it.

Put the Emmitt Smith philosophy of the Dallas Cowboys to work for you. "On game day, everybody wants to play. But if you didn't train on the training days, you don't play on game day."

But exercising for the sake of exercise....is just as "fatal" as 'going on a diet'. You can't live on "a diet" - you can live on a balanced, healthy eating plan that allows some occasional indulgences. There's no total deprivation there. There's guidelines - not rules.

And to "go to the gym" without a purpose other than to maintain the shape you've got...well, let's see....I know someone that did that (this wasn't me) that I was a personal trainer for. And she ran the full gamut...she had a gym membership - thinking it would motivate her to go if she had to pay, she paid for me as a personal trainer - thinking that would "make her go harder and more focused at her workouts", she bought the highest dollar shoes and the cutest little workout clothes I'd ever seen and couldn't have afforded, she did it all - very literally - to keep per motivated to keep pushing herself.

Finally, the mental fatigue won...and she was just about ready to quit the entire regime. She'd done pilates, spinning, aerobics, tae bo...if it was a class she'd taken it and more than 5 times!

Finally....I convinced her to go out for a 5K (3.2 mile) run with me. She wasn't a runner...and I knew this was going to take 45 minutes at least and that is what I wanted. The first 1/2 mile she was tense about "keeping up and not looking stupid" and I'm pretty good about putting people at ease...this wasn't about fast that day. And we talked...well, she talked. She talked about how she couldn't stay motivated, that it had started a year ago with her noticed that she wasn't as focused and she was going all over the planet new classes, new ideas, new clothes, new regimes and that was fatiguing emotionally and mentally and she was now down to almost quitting the whole thing and how she just couldn't do that because she liked how she looked, the way her clothes fit, the copmliments she got at 42 about how she looked 30. And I have so been there at one point in my life...

And I asked what those looks, attention were getting her...and there was a long pause and she responded that part of her lack of motivation was that it wasn't as rewarding as she thought it would be. The looks weren't as frequent as she'd anticipatd, the dates weren't coming thru the email, fax, phone, and IM every second of the day...very frustratedly she admitted that she looked this good, she was this dedicated and still - she had no life partner. And...I have so been there.

The suggestion I made took root and sprouted just a little that day. I suggested that in addition to her looks and her fit body and all the attention it got her that she might consider taking up a sport or a goal that involved her mind and her abilities other than looks - that it didn't matter if she looked good, but could she perform.

Last December...she ran her first marathon. She's got no problem with motivation or focus anymore. She does want to look good - and she does. She does want to perform - and she does and she gets to pick in what venues.

Erin

quickblade14@hotmail.com

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-20-2003
Fri, 04-04-2003 - 8:50pm
Well, thanks to you! If you hadn't talked about what a great workout you got on the EC, I'd still be trudging along at whatever I was doing before, something like 8 or 9. This group also got me motivated to start trying pull-ups again and doing more pushups, too. Thanks everyone!





iVillage Member
Registered: 03-20-2003
Fri, 04-04-2003 - 8:59pm
There's so much truth in what you're saying. I think that's one reason I've been talking about training for something that's more challenging. For my two favorite activities, skiing and skating, what limits me right now is my skill. I'm in good enough shape to perform at my level and being in better shape won't help, until I'm better at the activity. I did start running, but I'm starting to think it's not for me. My knees still hurt too much after I'm done and for the rest of the day, I can't walk w/out pain.

I really relate to that woman you were trained about spending years at the gym and needing a challenge. I'm looking for that challenge. Thanks for you insight!






iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Sun, 04-06-2003 - 12:35pm
This is something that I know I've talked about here. Making sure that you don't find yourself "going through the motions". It is something that each person must be self-vigilant over. However... when you find out that you have been, beating yourself up is counterproductive. So, you fell into a rut... pick yourself up, dust yourself off and move forward. Every one of us have done it, and will likely do it again, it is part of the process. Knowing when to let go of the yucky feelings and try harder is the lesson here, not that you weren't doing enough!

While I agree wholeheartidly with having goals, I don't necessarily agree with having some great aspirations of running races, etc as that goal. And this stance comes from personal experience. I have lived with pain for nearly three years because I was so focused on a goal that I forgot to listen to my body. IF you set a goal to run a race or something like that, make darn certain that your training schedule to achieve that goal is not counter-productive to the bigger picture (A HEALTHY BODY). While it can be motivating, goodness knows it was for me at the time, it can also be the catalyst for injuries and unhappiness, if you aren't careful.

One of the things that Doc Earles taught me was to sit down every two weeks and dust off the daily, weekly and monthly goals and examine what worked and didn't and what I would change to make the goals achievable. I keep a copy of them posted inside my locker at the gym, one on the fridge at home and one in my training log. They are simple things, that actually need looking at this weekend because I know that 3 of them are going to the "have achieved" instead of the "trying for" portion of the sheet! Little goals, simple goals... "I will eat one more green leafy veggie at least 5 times a week," or, "I will cut white sugar from my coffee and tea entirely," (I did that one three weeks ago!) and exercise wise, "I will drop 10 pounds of assist from the pull up machine every month until I'm supporting my own weight." That one is harder and longer term, since I'm still assiting at 80 to 90. But it is a solid goal that I TRY harder when I lift back because of. See what I mean? You don't need lofty goals, just goals:)

I know this answer is a day late as usual but I hope it helps even a bit!

~K~

~Kiervin~

Co-author of:  MONSTER'S INK HORROR ANTHOLOGY By Cyber-Pulp Press

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-20-2003
Sun, 04-06-2003 - 4:02pm
Those are good suggestions--thanks. I should sit down every month and re-evaluate. I'm thinking I've been on autopilot at the gym since I was pregnant with my daughter, so that's five years that I've been just marking time at the gym. Thanks for all the feedback--you guys are great!





iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Mon, 04-07-2003 - 11:48am
Well, if you need to skills...you need to go out and participate in the activity and gain the skills through a combination of instruction/experience.

But if you're assessing whether physically you're able to participate in those activities and are finding you cannot - there are other challenges out there. Make a choice...that enable your decisions and efforts and sacrifices not to be a source of resentment or regret and you'll be just fine.

Erin

quickblade14@hotmail.com