Judie Rae...hiking pictures blown up..

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Judie Rae...hiking pictures blown up..
14
Thu, 05-08-2003 - 2:34pm
Judie, I really want to do that with the picture. How big did you get yours enlarged? Where did you do it? I normally upload to ofoto and they make gorgeous glossy greeting cards, at the very least I will do that, but want to do the enlargement. In Sedona they had a process called Glicee or something that they put the pictures through some kind of laser print and put on canvas. It was very unique.

I'd love to see that picture from your Pacific Crest Trail hike, do you have it on a website? Have you taken a photography class? It's on my to do list, I love taking pictures and consider it a beautiful art form. I took some of wild flowers since they were in season at Sedona, I'm going to scan and upload soon.

Deb

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iVillage Member
Registered: 01-22-2002
Thu, 05-08-2003 - 5:49pm
I don't know the exact size, E's mom had it blown up, but it's 16x20 or bigger. We've got it on our kitchen wall all by itself, so it's good-sized. I'm sure she took the photo to a real photo shop in our area, this isn't something I'd trust to an online place, because you really want good quality! You might take your photo to a professional and ask what the cutoff would be for a good quality big picture, if it's digital there is a point that those get grainy. She had it enlarged and matted and framed for him for his birthday last year, but we sweated over finding the right crop of just the right picture! Your choice will be easy! ;) Edit: I just noticed that the picture in our kitchen is the left side of "Long Hike", the trail and my butt have been cropped out! lol...

As far as our PCT pictures, I just put them on the internet yesterday! http://photos.yahoo.com/bc/jubethrae/lst?.dir=/Pacific+Crest+Trail+%2701

Those are with that cheap $10 camera, the colors are nowhere near as beautiful nor the scenery as grand as in real life. E takes most of our pictures, and he does a pretty darned good job with them! There was actually an amateur photographer on our trip, he lugged his bag of camera gear (in a drybag)all 75 miles--he had to love it, but I know he got some outstanding shots.

Enjoy the photos!

Judie


Edited 5/8/2003 5:53:08 PM ET by judie_rae

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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-20-2003
Fri, 05-09-2003 - 12:22am
Those are great pictures! I finally had a chance to go through them. You and your BF make a good looking couple. Was this part of the Pacific Coast Trail? I love some of the shots that really show how far up you climbed. That pack you had was huge--was that 50 pounds? How long did the hike take? I'd love to do something like that. Did you sign up with a group? Was it really hard to do? Does you feel like you're playing 20 questions, yet?;-) Thanks--I can only live things like that vicariously right now.





iVillage Member
Registered: 01-22-2002
Fri, 05-09-2003 - 9:05am
Lol...don't worry, I love talking about that trip! It was part of the Pacific Crest Trail, which starts down around Mexico and travels along ridge tops through the Sierras and Cascades all the way to Canada. We hiked the northernmost 75 miles (about 8 days) with a group from the Sierra Club, it's one of their outings that I think is offered every year.

Yes, my pack was about 50 pounds! I put it on the scale at the airport after all the food and commissary (cooking) gear was taken out of it and it still weighed 35 pounds. It's pretty spare packing, you'll notice that I was wearing two tee shirts all week--that's very typical. For a week hiking we took 2-3 tee shirts, 2 pairs of shorts, a change of underwear and socks for every other day, and then whatever extreme weather gear you need (we had temperatures from 40 to 95). If you find water, you wash! If it's deep enough to get in and not 40 degrees, you jump in! It's a whole new earthy experience, I "washed" my hair twice and didn't shave at all--you have to be very careful with soap-type products to keep them away from water sources and only use biodegradable stuff in very very small amounts.

Typically we'd hike 9-11 miles, but there were shorter days in the beginning, and we'd have an elevation change of around 1000 feet (both up and down), so there was lots of wear and tear on our knees. Fortunately the altitude isn't as high as the Rockies, but every hour of training was worth it. Since there aren't mountains to climb in eastern Illinois, I did a lot of running for leg strength, deep water aerobics for arm and core strength, and lap swimming to improve my lung capacity (for altitude).

I really like group trips, you learn a lot from other people's experiences and you get ideas for the next trips you want to do, and sometimes it helps to have people around that have seen and done it all--where we were there was one road that crossed about halfway between our van and Canada, and otherwise no communication with the outside world, so you need people that can handle a crisis if you have one.

Thanks for all the questions Jean! And thanks for the compliment too...he's my hunka hunka man!

Judie

Judie Image hosted by Photobucket.com

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-25-2003
Fri, 05-09-2003 - 9:10am
great pics. funny though, i have almost the exact same shot of us at diablo lake. i guess that's a pretty common one!
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-20-2003
Fri, 05-09-2003 - 9:31am
That sounds like fun! Thanks for all the info. I read an article recently about a couple who are about to hike the whole Pacific Crest Trail for the third time. I think they're in the 60's (or 50's--they're both retired). They said the hardest thing is to be able to eat enough so they don't lose too much weight. I thought, that would be a great problem to have! Part of me really wants to do it, but part of me is so wimpy and loves flush toilets. It must feel great to know you've done it!





iVillage Member
Registered: 04-03-2003
Fri, 05-09-2003 - 9:55am
You know, I have never in my life done a real hike (where you carry a pack, overnight, the whole nine yards). I've only done small day hikes, but one of my dreams is to hike the Appalachian trail sometime in my lifetime. I love reading stories about older people who are able to accomplish things like that. I'm so inspired! Flush toilets or not.... :)
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Fri, 05-09-2003 - 10:58am
Judie---thanks for all the responses to the hiking questions, learning a lot! I have one for you. I just had a junky ole backpack for our Grand Canyon hike. It turned out to be about 11 miles with a 3000 elevation change (to me...straight up and straight down, at least my knees told me so).

Carrying the big bottles of water was very awkward and I was glad I had a strong back from my ab work. Anyway, for such a day hike what do you use, that big backpack? Any suggestions on what type to buy for that kind of hike. Mine had no support around my waist (belt), and I think a Camelback at the very least would've been more helpful than pulling the water bottles out. Do you use one of those? The degrees changed from 55 at the rim to almost 90 at the bottom. We needed water!

Also, I noticed your hiking socks were a lot higher than mine, I need the longer ones, had silk liners under them that got exposed to all that red dirt. What a mess. The back of my legs was caked with the red dirt too.

Deb

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-20-2003
Fri, 05-09-2003 - 11:01am
I talked to my husband about possibly doing that--hiking the Appalachians. I've only been on day hikes, too. Maybe I should do an overnight first before I tackle 6 months! I got inspired reading the story about the couple, too.





iVillage Member
Registered: 03-25-2003
Fri, 05-09-2003 - 11:19am
i've used a camelback for day hikes and i would recommend one. very comfortable and convenient, plus it doesn't shift and send you off balance like water bottles sometimes do. it feels lighter than carrying a pack with water bottles too, but maybe that's mostly psychological.
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-20-2003
Fri, 05-09-2003 - 11:27am
That's good to know about the camelbak. I was given one for my birthday and wasn't sure if I'd use it. My husband gave me a hip sack that carries water bottles for Christmas. I used a hipsack last summer and it worked fine. I've seen people ski w/ the camelbaks and thought of using it there, too. This is a REALLY bad thing I do, but I don't drink enough while I ski or hike because I have a tiny bladder and don't want to be running to the bathroom every 15 minutes. I drink a lot up to an hour before and then minimally until after. I'm such a waterholic normally, too.





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