Working out and weight

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-09-2004
Working out and weight
22
Fri, 08-29-2008 - 8:50am

I started a weight lifting workout designed by a friend that used to body build almost two years ago. It was totally new for me because it focused on resistance training, not cardio. Well, I lost about ten pounds in a course of several months and was thrilled. (I wasn't overweight to start- 5'8" and 135 pounds then.) Last summer, I got surgery and couldn't work out, but I walked,

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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-25-2003
Fri, 08-29-2008 - 9:41am

from what you've said, i think it sounds like your friend knows what he is talking about and you should listen to him. i hesitate to give you my opinion because i'll take all this time to write it and you won't listen to a word i say. but here goes: you don't need to lose weight. stop weighing yourself. yes, really. completely stop weighing yourself. you are using the scale in a destructive, not constructive way. ok, i'll be reasonable. just try to go two months without weighing yourself at all. two months.


you want to gain muscle. it doesn't sound like you need to lose fat. (but by all means, test your body fat to reassure you of this. i don't think you should do it yourself though, you need to have it done by someone who knows what they are doing or else it won't be accurate.)


so back on my point... you want to gain muscle but you aren't going to lose fat because you don't have any you need to lose. if you gain muscle without losing fat, you will gain weight. this is ok -- it is good and healthy and sexy and wonderful to add pounds of muscle to your body. so you will strength train and gain muscle and you will probably be gaining weight but you won't know you are gaining weight because you are not weighing yourself.


there is one slight disagreement i have with your friend. the cardio will only burn up the muscle mass if you aren't eating enough calories to fuel your workouts. some cardio is good because it's good for your heart and lungs. so keep doing some

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-09-2008
Fri, 08-29-2008 - 10:01am

Welcome to gymrats.

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-09-2004
Fri, 08-29-2008 - 11:30am
I want to thank both of you. I assure you that I DO eat. :) I actually "try" to follow a 40-40-20 ration, but I like carbs. :) I consciously go for the whole grains and protein. I also am well aware if you cut back on calories too much your body's metabolism will slwo down. Therefore, one day a week I do eat more calories than the others. My "fitness friend:) " just got back to me and basically just told me to "keep the faith:)" because the weight gain is a sign I'm actually toward the road to success as it is due to microtears from the work out my muscle is holing on to water and gylcogen to do the repairs. However, growing up with a twisted relationship with the scale, it's EXTREMELY difficult for me to see the scale go up, even if I do see more muscle and definition.
iVillage Member
Registered: 09-23-2006
Fri, 08-29-2008 - 11:44am

Shout it loud, Jen!

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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-20-2003
Fri, 08-29-2008 - 12:47pm
Welcome! You've already gotten great advice and it sounds like your fitness friend knows what he's talking about (although I agree w/ jen on the part about burning muscle--unlikely unless you're severely cutting back on calories).





iVillage Member
Registered: 03-20-2003
Fri, 08-29-2008 - 12:53pm

Excellent feedback.






iVillage Member
Registered: 03-25-2003
Fri, 08-29-2008 - 2:59pm

that's a totally different issue. "needing" to weigh yourself because it is an effective tool to maintain healthy weight loss is not the same as a self-admitted always-been-on-the-low-end-of-average-weight person psychologically "needing" to weigh herself in order not to unnecessarily stress out about her weight. because someone who is 5'8" and 135 lbs and worried about gaining 1.5 pounds is unnecessarily stressed out about her weight.

it's like, if an obese person wants to lose weight you can arguably say that she "needs" to count calories as a tool to do that. the "needing" is because it's a necessary tool, not a psychological compulsion. it's not the same as someone with an eating disorder "needing" to count calories.

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-09-2004
Fri, 08-29-2008 - 4:47pm
Thanks again for the feedback. I do weigh myself daily to keep track, but I do get too upset about it. I am 5"8", but I actually was 135 BEFORE I lost the weight. I'm getting bugged now because I'm averaging around 127 -128 lately instead of 125. Now, I know that's not right for my height, hence I need another tool such as body fat measurement to gauge my success.
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-20-2003
Fri, 08-29-2008 - 5:27pm

I'm going to be blunt with tough love but your BMI is very close to putting






iVillage Member
Registered: 03-20-2003
Fri, 08-29-2008 - 5:31pm
I can understand what you mean in this case. I just wanted to piont out for others who might be reading and doing it that it can be perfectly healthy to weigh yourself or "need" to weigh yourself more often than every other month.










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