Tracey Anderson high rep workout

iVillage Member
Registered: 11-09-2001
Tracey Anderson high rep workout
9
Mon, 04-06-2009 - 9:35pm

Did anyone catch this workout on the Today show last week? I just happened to see it while I was getting ready for work. Here's her site: http://tracyandersonmethod.com/


The workout that she did on the show is on the today show website. Anyway, she did a few high rep exercises for a "time crunch" workout but I think one of her big things is to do a lot of high reps of an exercise - like 80 reps. These are without weights. What do you think of this - loading up on the reps? I was just thinking about this the other day and then saw her workout. I'm always torn between high reps/no weights and low reps/heavy weights. Just curious. Cathy

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-15-2004
Mon, 04-06-2009 - 10:42pm
In general, I think high rep/no weight workouts are more or less pointless. However, if you're a long-time exerciser, switching it up is important and I think that's a decent option for a short while. I wouldn't expect to see much progress from it... I would think it would mostly be a break from "real" lifting and a different (albeit inefficient) way to work your muscles.
iVillage Member
Registered: 09-02-2004
Tue, 04-07-2009 - 6:25am
I think the fact that Ms. Anderson famously said something about "no woman needs to lift more than 3 pound weights" (please let that be a misquote) that riles me up the most. She's helping to perpetuate the "women get bulky by lifting heavy" myth. But in general, I agree with Kel, high reps/low weight is a major time waster at best.




Lilypie First Birthday tickers
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Registered: 11-09-2001
Tue, 04-07-2009 - 11:39am
Yeah, I agree with you both. But there has to be some benefit to doing 80 reps of anything!! I heard her talking about bulking up on the Today show and thought that was so dishonest of her to disparage weight lifting like that when she knows for a fact that you don't bulk up unless you're a competitive weight lifter. The other thing I thought of was that it would be next to impossible to do 80 reps of sone of these exercises. I couldn't stay on my hands like that for so long, it would really hurt my shoulders.
iVillage Member
Registered: 09-02-2004
Tue, 04-07-2009 - 12:03pm

"But there has to be some benefit to doing 80 reps of anything!!"

You build some muscular endurance. And it's really good for wasting time.





Lilypie First Birthday tickers
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-20-2003
Sun, 04-12-2009 - 7:15pm

I'm weighing in late on this but kel and srt have covered it.






Avatar for soleilune
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Tue, 04-28-2009 - 11:17am

I'm not weighing in on the Tracy Anderson (who, if she is saying the things I read here, is the bane of my professional existence) thing so much as the denigration here of high rep work.

Any time you work a muscle to fatigue or failure, if using proper form, you are going to develop it. Yes, high rep work is likely to be aerobic, BUT you are still developing muscles, the slow twitch fibres in particular. Can any of you that run or cycle regularly tell me you haven't developed your leg muscles? Or explain to me why hardcore cyclists have better legs than most body builders? Aerobic work does not automatically cancel out muscle work.

This quite frankly is one of my pet peeves - totally disregarding a type of training based on misinformation. High rep training is a legitimate and effective part of a comprehensive cross training program.

That said, I think there are many BETTER ways of training one's muscles.

I'm sorry if I sound a little cranky about this, but having been in this business for almost 20 years, but it boggles my mind how many people, professionals, forget the science involved.

Soleilune
Soleilune
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-20-2003
Tue, 04-28-2009 - 12:09pm

Yes, but doing low weights, high reps won't develop fast twitch muscles that do grow larger.






iVillage Member
Registered: 07-09-2008
Tue, 04-28-2009 - 9:52pm
...and to add to that, I thought it was a clinically proven fact that as we age, we actually lose muscle mass, such that it is healthier to build it up.
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-20-2003
Wed, 04-29-2009 - 8:06am
Calcium is the one area where I always fall short.