Another interesting article...

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-15-2004
Another interesting article...
10
Fri, 09-11-2009 - 10:27am

http://www.time.com/time/health/article/0,8599,1914857,00.html

If you're too lazy to read it, the summary is this: researchers have found that those of us who exercise regularly tend to "make up" for it by being lazier the rest of the day. It also states that they're finding those of us who exercise tend to eat more in general because exercise stimulates hunger. Granted, we would need more calories than someone who didn't exercise but this is saying that we go above and beyond what we actually need to be eating.

This has given me some food for thought because as much as I like to go hard and do intense workouts, I find that instead of invigorating me, it tends to wipe me out for the rest of the day. I have often wondered what the point is of doing a crazy step video or an intense HIIT session if I'm practically comatose the rest of the day.

Thoughts?

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-03-2009
Fri, 09-11-2009 - 10:37am

The food thing makes perfect sense to me and I had that experience. I was training for my first marathon a couple of years back and though that gave me license to eat pizzas for breakfast. I didn't gain weight, but I certainly didn't lose any which surprised me a lot. That's when I learned that each mile is only 120 calories and even at 30 or 40 per week, you cannot consume 3000 calories a day.

As for the wiping you out, I am in the minority I think in that I do not exercise at set times. Sometimes in the morning, sometimes at lunch or if it is a run or bike day, then I tend to do that in the evening. Either way, I always feel much better after exercise ad never wiped by it unless it is a particularly long run or bike.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-25-2003
Fri, 09-11-2009 - 11:13am

I believe it, though I'm pretty sedentary regardless of whether I'm exercising or not.


I was just thinking about this yesterday. I think I eat LESS when I exercise, because I spend so much "prime eating time" at the gym and don't have time/energy to eat as much as I normally would. For instance if I came straight home after work, I'd probably eat an "afterschool" snack and then maybe order delivery for dinner later. Or maybe instead of going home, I'd go out for drinks with friends and then eat fattening bar food. Whereas, if I go to the gym after work, I usually don't eat a snack. And then by the time I get home from the gym, I'm so tired and it's so late, I'll eat like just some green beans and some strawberries for dinner.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-20-2003
Fri, 09-11-2009 - 11:15am
I've read that before. I don't know, I can be pretty lazy even on days I don't work out! No, seriously, there was a time when I worked so hard at my workout and kept it up for a couple of hours that my legs felt like lead and when I went to run around w/ my kids I didn't have the same energy. But, I think I was far more active then, outside the gym, than my friends were who didn't work out. As for eating more, I don't find that to be the case for me, except when I do very long runs (over 12 miles, maybe 15) or DCAC when I'm famished. But, I figure I'm burning well over 1000 calories. The question is what is the difference for you, in average activity on days you work out vs days you don't? What about your appetite? I don't agree overall w/ the article, though, because if you compared the health of the average gym rat to the average person who doesn't work out, I think a gym rat would be healthier, not that the gym rat would eat more and be more sedentary all day.










iVillage Member
Registered: 03-20-2003
Fri, 09-11-2009 - 11:19am
Oops, I should have looked at the article first before I responded. I do remember seeing that when it first came out. I agree that exercise won't make you thin. I've said here often the diet is a big part of the equation (and I've used the 80% number but can't remember where I read it). As that reporter goes, I'd be curious what would happen to him if he kept up the same diet and stopped working out. I'd bet he'd gain weight. I know a lot of people who've kept weight off with diet alone but few who've kept it off with exercise alone. It's a whole lifestyle change and people who don't think so don't keep weight off.










iVillage Member
Registered: 07-09-2008
Fri, 09-11-2009 - 3:38pm

Perhaps everything in moderation is the answer?

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-20-2003
Tue, 09-15-2009 - 7:22am
My BIL lost a lot of weight by walking every day. But, he walked 8-12 miles. I can't imagine spending the time! But then, as tall as he is (6'4"), his walking pace is probably faster than my running.










iVillage Member
Registered: 07-09-2008
Tue, 09-15-2009 - 8:44am

I thought of the article when I was "strolling" on the bike this weekend.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-20-2003
Wed, 09-23-2009 - 7:25am
Did you see the month's ACE magazine that refuted this article?










iVillage Member
Registered: 07-09-2008
Wed, 09-23-2009 - 7:45am
Lol.
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-20-2003
Wed, 09-23-2009 - 8:37am
I'm much more cynical than you because I think it shows how people can cherry pick information to prove what you want to prove (as in politics). I think the story lies in between that exercise alone won't help but you need both the right diet and exercise for a healthy lifestyle. But, that's boring and won't sell many issues, or attract much attention.