Revised BMI guidelines?

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-25-2003
Revised BMI guidelines?
7
Thu, 03-04-2010 - 11:50am

When I went to my GYN for an annual visit this week, on his scale he had a photocopy of a height/weight chart that was different than I've seen before. Within the range of what I would have thought to be a healthy height/weight ratio there was a zone that was labelled something like "at risk." The chart said that "recent" studies (I don't know when the sheet was printed) have found significant increased health risks for those in this "at risk" range.


I can't recall exactly what the different categories were but I did notice that I wasn't too far

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-20-2003
Thu, 03-04-2010 - 1:48pm
Hmmm, a few years ago, they revised what they considered "obese" and "overweight" by BMI measurements and people were classified as each at a lower weight so this takes it further. I can't believe that 5'4" and 124 pounds puts you "at risk." I've also read that they're thinking of having different BMI ranges for different races, eg. Asians have lower muscle mass and should have lower BMIs than African Americans who tend to have more muscles and could be healthier at higher BMIs. Personally, I think that's loaded and it should all be done on an individual basis. BMI is a quick and dirty method for determining health and we should keep that in mind. As I've maintained all along, I'd rather work out, eat well and be a heavier BMI than not work out, drink coffee all day and be a lower BMI. So, I'd never encourage anyone to lose or keep those "last 10." I'd encourage them to become/remain active and eat better and let their body weight fall where it is. I know for me to lose and keep off ten pounds would require unhealthy mental thinking, extreme dieting/exercise and that isn't good for me, nor would it last for long.










iVillage Member
Registered: 03-25-2003
Thu, 03-04-2010 - 4:19pm

I should clarify - the chart didn't say I am "at risk" at 124 lbs, but I was (in my view) surprisingly close to being "at risk." I noticed that when I was 139 lbs

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-15-2004
Thu, 03-04-2010 - 5:16pm
I certainly won't speak for anyone else, but I'm not going to spend any time or energy worrying about the "last few". If you're active and eat decently (note that I didn't say perfect), I refuse to believe that ten extra pounds are going to make that much of a difference. If they do, they do but that is a chance I'm willing to take. Nobody will care if I'm skinny when I die. :) They will care that I had a fun life and enjoyed myself.
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-09-2008
Thu, 03-04-2010 - 6:21pm

I know that there has been some research on cholesterol which seems to indicate that "lower is better," with the concept that the more fats floating around means more plaque buildup in your arteries which means higher risk for a heart attack or stroke.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-20-2003
Thu, 03-04-2010 - 8:44pm

I'd like to see the chart and what the new weights are that are "at risk." I've done a search and didn't see anything new. It's interesting to see people's views of themselves. Even in the Biggest Loser, people cry and can't believe they're as heavy and unhealthy as they are, even when it's apparent to everyone else. I've read that your view of yourself is how you were at 14 so if someone had been obese then but lost the weight years later, they still see themselves as obese and vice versa. If that's true, that would explain how someone could see him/herself as "healthy" even if not.

Anyway, at 5'1" and about 120ish pounds, I am what I am. I'm not going to try to lose weight even if I were at risk because it's not worth the effort for me. I have no doubt I'm healthy and fit, ski injuries aside whether I'm in the "bad" or "good" group. I wouldn't try to convince someone to lose the last 10 if I thought their lifestyle were healthy enough (which is a sliding scale--I'd put it roughly at 5-6 days of cardio for at least 30 minutes and 2-3 days of lifting per week). OTOH, if someone were thin but didn't do that, I wouldn't think she was healthy. I've met too many women who work out, ate well but were unhappy with their bodies and I think that's a problem, too.











iVillage Member
Registered: 03-20-2003
Thu, 03-04-2010 - 8:45pm
Yep.










iVillage Member
Registered: 03-20-2003
Thu, 03-04-2010 - 8:48pm
I've read studies that cholesterol levels are irrelevant and that the C-reactive protein. I've also read studies that low cholesterol in conjunction with low blood pressure isn't a good combination (which I have). Anyway, BMI means nothing if you don't know the body fat composition. I'd guess a good percentage of those Olympic athletes have BMIs that are too high--look at Lindsay Von. But, no one is going to say she's unhealthy/unfit.