Amount of solids at 9 months

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-28-2011
Amount of solids at 9 months
8
Fri, 01-06-2012 - 6:10pm
Hi again,

After starting DD on pures around six months, DH and I opted to switch to baby lead weaning, ie offering finger foods so DD can self feed. She is now 9 months old and gets one meal most days (occasionally we skip it and she is only BFing that day) with about 2 oz of water from a straw cup after. We just had her 9 month checkup and she's growing quite well (19 lb 6 oz and 28.5 in) but the dr suggested giving her more solids and feeding before BFing. I thought that until one year solids are mostly experimentation and less nutrition. Should I offer more solids? She gets whatever we are having and doesn't necessarily eat much but tries everything.
TIA
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-13-2008
Fri, 01-06-2012 - 6:40pm

She is growing well, and is happy and contented with what you are doing. You can continue on the same track as it sounds just right for baby-led weaning. The baby will let you know what she wants as you are eating.

If you were wanting to fast track weaning, and replace breastmilk with solids, you would offer more.

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-13-2008
Fri, 01-06-2012 - 6:42pm

Just to note, when my youngest was just over 1 year old, we travelled to Italy from Australia. He liked his solids, but while travelling around, especially in Italy, there were days when he just breastfed all day as his sole nutrition. No problem.

Teresa

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-21-2011
Sat, 01-07-2012 - 1:39pm
I'm with Teresa. Feeding before nursing is a really fast way to tank your supply and get your kid off the boob. Your doc probably means well, but I think this is an older and less BF informed viewpoint.

Docs are pretty good about ear infections and contagious things picked up in daycare, but they aren't nutritionists (and get little to NO nutrition education in medical school) and (most of them) aren't lactation experts.
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-28-2011
Mon, 01-09-2012 - 10:44pm
Thank you ladies for the responses.
I decided to go with trying to offer solids twice a day (self feeding finger foods) after nursing. I figure this way she has access to food more often if she's interested but we aren't replacing BFing either. I'll be happy if twice a day happens 2 to 3 times a week since some days things just don't line up the way I plan. Thanks again.
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-13-2008
Mon, 01-09-2012 - 11:56pm

Sounds good. Let your baby mostly decide what to try, offer a variety of the things you eat anyway, keep an eye on whether there are reactions to any new food, and it should all work out as your baby's diet slowly and naturally expands.

Teresa

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-10-2008
Mon, 01-16-2012 - 10:34am
I was actually getting ready to post this exact question, glad I found this thread. And thank you for the reassuring answers. I am also wondering how important it is to be consistent with the amount of solids offered each day. For example, yesterday my 9mo DD ate a good amount more solids than usual, and therefore nursed less. If she does this today as well, but not tomorrow, do I have to worry that my supply will decrease so much that enough milk won't be there on a day that she decides not to eat as much?
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-28-2011
Mon, 01-16-2012 - 10:53am
I'm not an expert but I've gone through many bouts of ups and downs, nursing less for illness, teething, etc. I just found that DD nursed more for a day or two and then we settled back into the routine. My DD has ups and downs with solids and it doesn't seem to phase her as long as she can nurse on demand after a day of big solid intake. I'd just make sure to always bf before solids so she doesn't pig out needlessly.
I'm a bit of a latecomer to bf (EP till 11 weeks) but I learned to trust DDs instincts. She seems to do just what is needed instinctively without much needed worry or effort on my part to maintain the balance.
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-13-2008
Mon, 01-16-2012 - 5:04pm

It really won't kill your supply if this happens. You will find by now that the milk will let down and your baby will get what she needs. Even in a much older toddler that may be breastfeeding very little, if for some reason, the toddler wants to breastfeed a lot more, such as if they are sick and not eating, the breasts can respond. If the toddler keeps the higher demand for a while like a few days or a week, you may even notice a full feeling when they then drop some of these nursing sessions.

Just go with the flow and your body will respond.

Teresa