Wisdom Teeth Extraction and nursing...

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-15-2011
Wisdom Teeth Extraction and nursing...
8
Tue, 03-15-2011 - 10:04pm

I have a 6.5 month old daughter that doesn't take a bottle and still isn't too fond of solids...She is strictly breastfed...I have to have 5 teeth extracted (4 of which are my wisdom teeth) this coming Friday unexpectedly...I was hoping to wait until she was on more solids and could go longer between nursing sessions, but according to my dentist and the pain I currently am in, there is just no way I can wait...so my question is how long do I have to wait after I come out of general anesthesia to nurse?

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-10-2008
Tue, 03-15-2011 - 10:24pm
The short answer is you don't have to wait at all. By the time you're awake enough to hold and interact with the baby, the anesthesia is out of your bloodstream enough for you to nurse.

Here is some great information about anesthesia and dental work and nursing: http://www.kellymom.com/health/meds/anesthetics.html
http://www.kellymom.com/health/illness/mom-surgery.html
http://www.kellymom.com/health/illness/dentalwork.html

If you wouldn't mind me asking, can you let me know where you read online that nursing after anesthesia WOULDN'T be ok? I always like to see where people get conflicting or inaccurate information about nursing so that we can work to change it.

If your oral surgeon has any concerns about the meds, can you get specifics about the specific meds he'll be using? We'd be more than happy to look them up in Dr. Thomas Hale's "Medication and Mother's Milk" which is the bible of lactation pharmacology.

I hope you feel better quickly! Mouth pain is the pits!
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iVillage Member
Registered: 01-12-2006
Tue, 03-15-2011 - 11:34pm
ITA w/ Dana that you should be able to nurse very quickly after the surgery; however, I would encourage you to express some milk to have for baby in case she is hungry during the surgery. I know you said she doesn't take a bottle well, which I can relate to with my own two girls. However, I have found that they may take at least a small amount of a bottle if I'm truly unavailable (as in no where to be found). Also, my babies have been fed at time with medicine dropper / syringe ... when needed if I wasn't there.

Having some milk available in advance just seems like a good idea to me in case the procedure takes longer than expected, etc. If she needs it, I'm sure they can find a good way to feed it to her even if she doesn't like the bottle.

For me that would make me feel less anxious about being in surgery in general ... just knowing that there was milk available until I was able to nurse again.

HTH
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-15-2011
Wed, 03-16-2011 - 12:03pm
Most of the sites that said you would have to wait were just other message boards that came up wheni googled where people were saying there doctors had said they would have tomwait 24-48 hours. I referenced Kellymom and read differently there (I use that website a lot to get valuable information.). I went for my consult this morning and the oral surgeon saidinwould have to pump and dump a couple of times after the surgery before I can breastfeeding again. I am assuming that is just liability reasons, so I am just going to go with my gut. I do have a freezer stash for "emergency" situations like this, so I figure if she gets hungry enough she will take a bottle. I am being sedated through IV, and the procedure should take about an hour, so it shouldn't be too bad.

I did reference Kellymom to see if the medication I was prescribed is okay, I couldn't find some on there, so it would be very helpful if yo could reference the book for me....

Vicodin
Naprosyn
Pelvic
Amoxicillin
Decadron

Thank you so much for your help ladies!!
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-15-2011
Wed, 03-16-2011 - 12:05pm
Sorry for all the typos, I am using my phone!
iVillage Member
Registered: 06-10-2008
Wed, 03-16-2011 - 12:39pm
Sure, we'd be happy to.

Vicodin is category L3 (moderately safe) which means that they haven't done many studies to evaluate milk levels. Hale says "To reduce exposure of the infant, attempt to feed prior to taking the medication."

Naprosyn is category L3 also. Hale says "Although the amount of naproxen transferred via milk is minimal, one should use with caution in nursing mothers because of its long half-life and its effect on infant cardiovascular systems, kidneys and GI tract. However, its short term use postpartum or infrequent or occasional use would not necessarily be incompatible with breastfeeding."

I don't see anything for Pelvic. Could that be misspelled?

Amoxicillin is lactation category L1 (safest). No concerns whatsoever there.

Decadron is also L3. Hale says "No data are available on the transfer of dexamethasone into human milk. It is likely similar to that of prednisone which is extremely low. Doses of prednisone as high as 120mg fail to produce clinically relevant milk levels."
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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-15-2011
Wed, 03-16-2011 - 12:49pm
Thank you so much, you have been extremely helpful! And yes the one is Pepcid (not pelvic, stupid autocorrect)....
iVillage Member
Registered: 06-10-2008
Wed, 03-16-2011 - 12:56pm
Pepcid is L1 (safest). No concerns there.
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iVillage Member
Registered: 01-12-2006
Wed, 03-16-2011 - 1:09pm
Obviously the vicodin is being prescribed as a pain reliever and I'd guess the naprosyn is being prescribed as an anti-inflammatory. You might ask doc if something like 800 mg ibuprofen would be a decent substitute ... as it is both a pain reducer AND anti-inflammatory.

I can tell you that it might have been vicodin (it was definitely a narcotic) that was prescribed after the birth of my first child, but I never took it. But my OB definitely thought it was safe enough to use while I was nursing.

The naprosyn I've taken at other times in my life for different issues, but I'd highly suspect there is a decent anti-inflammaroty alternative here if you asked about it.

Dana is the girl with the book so her info from Dr. Hale is far more reliable than anything I'd say anyway, but just wanted to share that little bit of info. Sometimes if you ask doc for a different drug, they can easily prescribe something different.