14 months and won't unlatch!

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-01-2007
14 months and won't unlatch!
2
Sat, 11-21-2009 - 12:03pm
I thought I was heading towards some gentle weaning but not offering the breast during the day and just sticking to BF before her nap (usually just one now) and before bedtime and then some during the night as we co-sleep for half the night, but NOW.... I don't know if it's because my bout of food poisoning 3 days ago, a dip in supply and her not getting much at each feeding, but she is asking to nurse ALL day long! She is asking almost every hour in any position and just nurses for about 6-7 minutes. we just took an almost 2 hour nap and she was latched the whole time. I kept trying to delatch her and she would just fuss and ask for "mama milk." It was the same thing all night last night. She was latched the whole night. Obviously not eating the whole time, but still...this is not good! I'm now, at 14 months, definitely her human pacifier, right? What happened? Why is she all of a sudden needing to nurse so often and not wanting to be unlatched? She doesn't eat many solids during the day, just has no interest no matter what I do, so I don't want her to be hungry, but this is just insane!
Please help. I'm super sleepless now, she can't be very well rested and all of this milk can't be good for her teeth that she won't let me brush!
Stressed.
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Photobucket
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-01-2006
Sat, 11-21-2009 - 3:35pm

Hey Sarah!

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iVillage Member
Registered: 04-13-2008
Sun, 11-22-2009 - 5:36am

Direct nursing and breastmilk is not bad for the teeth in the way drinking formula from a bottle can be.

So even though she is being very clingy and nursing more than you had hoped for, you can rest easy about the teeth issue.

I would not try to force her to drop any session while she is in this clingy stage. That is likely to make her want to cling even more.

But if nightimes are an issue, and you can get your other half to assist with her at night, that would be good to give you a break. This can be done by SO keeping things dark (do not switch on lights), do not talk, do not touch a lot, offer her a sip of water - she may be settled with that. If she is truly hungry for breastmilk, of course don't deny her, but if she settles with this sort of routine, that will be good.

Teresa