9 month check up- weight gain rant

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-02-2008
9 month check up- weight gain rant
17
Mon, 04-05-2010 - 1:23pm

Hello All,


AH... this is my third attempt in posting this - hopefully it goes through fine!


So, i took LO to doc's for his 9 month check up on Friday. He weighed 16 lbs, 5 oz

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iVillage Member
Registered: 09-10-2009
Mon, 04-05-2010 - 9:52pm

Would it be ok if I asked you some questions?


How often are you nursing directly?


Are you and DH smaller people?


Any hormonal birth control?


Any health issues that might impact supply, like anemia, thyroid, hormonal issues or PCOS?


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iVillage Member
Registered: 12-02-2008
Mon, 04-05-2010 - 11:36pm

Hello,


I nurse him twice in the morning before I leave for work. I pump 4 times at work (15 minute sessions). I nurse him twice after i come back from work (probably one effective nurse adn then another one a dream feed/comfort nurse session). after that he comes to bed with me and has unlimited access to me.


I would not consider myself and DH smaller for our race (Indian). We both are 5'6",5'8" respectively and could be called medium frame (esp after delivery, i have gone up from being a petite frame!)


I dont use any birth control pill.


As far as I know, I dont have any issues mentioned. But it has been a while since I have had my annuals (last year, my PCP did not do annuals as she found that I was pregnant and did not want to perform annual examination).


May I know why you are asking me these questions?

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-12-2006
Tue, 04-06-2010 - 10:41am

Here are my thoughts for what they are worth:

I am married to an unusually large Indian man, but his parents and sister (and pretty much everyone else in his family I've met) are very small. My DH is reasonably tall at almost 6 feet, but his dad is 5 ft 4 in, his mom and sister are both 5 ft 1 in and sub 100 lbs. I myself am petite at 5 ft even and most of the people in my family are pretty petite too. So, I certainly didn't expect my children to be BIG.

Both my girls gained weight like championship piggies in the early months. Then, as they got older, they began to fall on the charts. My first pediatrician (whom I really, really loved ... and who also was Indian and happened to know my husband's family), simply said we wanted to watch her weight gain closely but she showed me how she plotted my baby's own weight points on the chart ... while she fell percentages on the standard growth chart, she was actually maintaining a slow, steady growth curve of her own. She wasn't on the chart at 12 mos at all (I honestly can't remember if she was at 9 mos ... if she was at all, she was less than 5 %).

We moved ... new pediatrician ... new baby. New baby was completely off the chart (and actually several standard deviations below any established growth curve) and new pediatrician panicked. But she also went back and forth ... she'd plot my baby's own curve and think everything looked ok. Then look at where she fell on the growth chart and was concerned (especially since my baby actually couldn't eat any solid foods even at 12 mos ... she choked on everything and even gagged on baby food).

Both my girls maintained their height and head circumference curves (youngest DD actually did fall on the height chart right around 12 mos ... but she had always been unusually tall, coincidentally making her seem even skinnier. Once she fell on the height chart, she's continued to maintain that new percentage and it makes more sense given her genetics ... and she'll likely still be a lot taller than her mama).

So, I guess my thoughts are: look at the baby not the scale. Does your baby look healthy? If baby looks good, nails and hair are growing, hair and nails are healthy and strong, and baby is developmentally on track, it's unlikely you are depriving baby of nutrition. Due to my DD's resistance to eating any foods (she was actually 15 mos old before she willingly ate any solid food of any kind), we were referred to a nutritionist for FTT. The nutritionist took one look at her and said this baby is healthy. Small but healthy. At her 2 year appt, my DD weighed 19 lbs ... and even the doc said, "she's clearly perfect and healthy. I wish she weighed more, but this just maybe her size. No one can argue that this little girl is FTT".

Also, plot your baby's weight points on the chart and draw a line connecting them ... are they gently curving up? If so, I'd guess everything is ok. If there are distinctly flat points or any valleys (where baby actually loses weight), further evaluation may be warranted. But even then may not mean anything is wrong. My second DD got sick and actually lost weight (but an extreme amount of weight) and had a HUGE valley, which is one of the things that sent our pediatrician into panic mode. I felt all along, my baby was healthy and strong. And in the end my instincts were proven to be correct.

HTH

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-02-2008
Tue, 04-06-2010 - 10:56am

Thanks for those comforting words. I will go back home and plot his weight and see how he performs.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-14-2005
Wed, 04-07-2010 - 10:54am

You may find this helpful - it's a growth chart calculator that gets you down to the exact percentile. I don't know what charts it's based off of, but I plotted your baby's weight and got 3%. My thought was that if you plot past weights and they're all around 3%, you know you have a consistent curve, even if baby is small. Just looking at those paper charts can make it hard to follow if baby is below the 5% line.

hth!

Rebecca

http://pediatrics.about.com/cs/usefultools/l/bl_kids_centils.htm

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iVillage Member
Registered: 12-02-2008
Wed, 04-07-2010 - 11:10am

Thanks a lot for sharing that calculator.... that was cool... I wonder why the percentile is coming different form what the ped told for the same weights entered!


Thanks anyways..i feel relaxed and relieved!

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-12-2006
Wed, 04-07-2010 - 1:17pm

For the benefit of lurkers, baby can actually gain at a consistent and healthy rate and NOT remain at the same percentile on the weight chart. The growth charts / percentages are comparisons of how much your baby weighs at any given point in time to how much other babies of the same age weigh at that same point in time.

If baby's own curve is steady and gently sloping upward, that is a good sign of healthy growth, even if baby falls from 50th percentile to 10th percentile over that same period of time. Some babies gain a lot early and then gain slows down a bit as they get older (this is actually very normal for breastfed babies), whereas some babies have slower gain early on but more consistent gain throughout the first year (this happens to be a more common growth pattern of formula fed babies).

Here's more reading on growth curves / percentiles, what they mean and how to read them:
http://www.kellymom.com/babyconcerns/growth/growthcharts.html

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-02-2008
Mon, 04-19-2010 - 5:52pm

Hello,


I was kinda expecting a reply from you on this. I am still in a dilemma as to whether to supplement nursing sessions w/ formula or include 2oz of formula w/ LO's breakfast or give him a 4 oz bottle at night?

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-12-2006
Mon, 04-19-2010 - 7:45pm

Are you still supplementing with formula at all? If so how much? How often is baby nursing now? Are the wet diapers adequate? Are his poopy diapers normal for him?

Whether or not you need to give formula at all at this point really depends on how he's doing. If he's having adequate diapers and is maintaining his own growth curve, it's very unlikely you need to supplement with formula at all.

If you've been giving formula, you'll need to replace it with nursing and / or expressed breast milk slowly, if you're in fact planning to transition away from the formula (some moms do what is called partial weaning where they have a couple feedings a day they use formula but exclusively nurse the rest of the time).

I'm not sure what "32 oz" rule you're talking about. Breastfed babies take on average (according to actual research) approximately 25 ounces of milk a day through 6 mos (the study showed a normal range of 16-30 ounces, but the average was 25 ounces / day). After baby begins eating solid foods, the amount of milk baby takes actually begins to go down as it is replaced by solid foods.

The amount of breastmilk remains the same regardless of baby's weight, size, age, etc. (except that after solid foods were introduced the milk intake did begin to decrease).

Let me know if that helps answer your question.

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-02-2008
Tue, 04-20-2010 - 10:51am

T am not supplementing w/ formula.LO

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