Milk intake at 8-9 months?

Community Leader
Registered: 10-16-2007
Milk intake at 8-9 months?
6
Wed, 03-31-2010 - 6:09pm

Hello, we have a discussion going on our playgroup and was hoping to get your input.

How much milk should our babies be getting right now? We're all feeling like the babies are probably only getting 15 oz...maybe 20 on a good day, but probably less. Gabe has gone from taking 12 oz during the day to 8-10 (usually 8, sometimes less). He has always been an efficient nurser (20-30 mins as a new born...now about 3 mins). I only feed solids once a day.

Gabe's routine:

Morning 6-8a: usually just a snack because he nursed during the night

Day 10a-6p: 8-10 oz from nanny and DH, sometimes less

Eve 6:30p-8p: Nurse, then I give him 1 oz of breastmilk mixed with cereal, 1/3 little jar of meat, 1/3 tub of Stage 2 veggie and 1/3 tub of Stage 2 fruit. Then he nurses once or twice before bed, but they are really quick sessions.

Night 10p: Nurse at 10p when I go to bed

Overnight 11p-4a: Nurse 1-2 times, sometimes a lot more depending on whether he's teething or needing some mama bonding time

I should add that Gabe is VERY HEALTHY! (fat, LOL) He is probably 21-22 lbs and not very tall for his age. Thanks for your advice!

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Edited 3/31/2010 6:29 pm ET by mom2addy

Michelle

Mom to Addison (8) & Gabriel (5)

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-31-2010
Thu, 04-01-2010 - 10:08pm

HI! I am new to this site.

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-12-2006
Fri, 04-02-2010 - 1:24am

Generally speaking a nursing infant averages about 25 ounces of milk intake a day from about 1 month to 6 months or sometime thereafter. As baby begins to increase solid food intake, baby's milk intake decreases. Ideally, breastmilk or formula should still be the primary source of calories for baby at 12 months.

To know if baby is getting enough milk, you should continue to monitor weight gain and diaper output. Prior to 12 months nursing should happen BEFORE solid foods to ensure baby doesn't fill belly on less nutrient dense solid foods and then doesn't take enough breastmilk. It is generally recommended that baby nurse and then have solid foods about 1/2 - 1 hour following a nursing session.

To more specifically answer your question, here's some info from kellymom:
What if baby is eating solid foods?

Sometime between six months and a year (as solids are introduced and slowly increased) baby's milk intake may begin to decrease, but breastmilk should provide the majority of baby's nutrition through the first year. Because of the great variability in the amount of solids that babies take during the second six months, the amount of milk will vary, too. One study found average breastmilk intake to be 30 oz per day (875 ml/day; 93% of total intake) at 7 months and 19 oz (550 ml/day; 50% of total energy intake) at 11-16 months.

Several studies have measured breastmilk intake for babies between 12 and 24 months and found typical amounts to be 14-19 oz per day (400-550 mL per day). Studies looking at breastmilk intake between 24 and 36 months have found typical amounts to be 10-12 oz per day (300-360 mL per day).

Here's some more info on solids and nursing:
http://www.kellymom.com/nutrition/solids/index.html

Also, I really like this link, as it offers a good look at a "sample menu" for a breastfed baby (including good information on appropriately sized servings) and also includes information on the minimum number of nursing sessions you'd expect at each age.
http://www.mother-2-mother.com/samplemenus.htm

Fwiw, it is generally recommended that baby should have a minimum of 5 nursing sessions / day (many babies will have more than this) until nine months and then a minimum of 4 sessions / day from 9-12 months.

If baby is nursing less often during the day but is waking at night to make up for the lost milk during the day, it may be a good idea to let baby take the lead on nursing (meaning mom nurses baby if baby asks to nurse) but also offering to nurse baby every 3 hours or so even if baby doesn't ask to nurse. I can tell you that I offered my two kids to nurse every 3 hours on average the entire first year and even if baby hadn't asked to nurse, neither rarely refused. By increasing baby's milk intake during the day, you may successfully reduce the amount of feedings at night (not always, but it does frequently help).

Hope that helps to answer your questions. Follow up if you need more info.

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-10-2009
Fri, 04-02-2010 - 7:52am

Tonya! What on earth were you doing up at 1:30am posting! And great info too BTW.


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iVillage Member
Registered: 01-12-2006
Fri, 04-02-2010 - 8:47am
Well it was only 12:30 a.m. where I live ... and I'm kind of a night owl. But yesterday I was up later than normal. I had a lot of caffeine yesterday :-)
Community Leader
Registered: 10-16-2007
Fri, 04-02-2010 - 1:29pm

Thank you, very helpful! (and a relief to hear that the bar isn't 30 oz!)

I'll share with the other moms.

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Michelle

Mom to Addison (8) & Gabriel (5)

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-31-2010
Fri, 04-02-2010 - 9:07pm

WOW~ THANK YOU!


I was always nursing on demand and when the daytime demand slowed, I just thought it was natural.