Solid Foods

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-09-2008
Solid Foods
16
Wed, 04-21-2010 - 9:13am

Hi! I've popped in here before with questions and I'm back again. :) My son is 12.5 months now and has been exclusively breastfed the entire time. I am quitting pumping at work and have soy milk (milk allergy)

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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-25-2003
In reply to: lizzyb1979
Wed, 04-21-2010 - 9:27am
This my sound a little odd, but bear with me. You might try calling your local early intervention program. Here in TX it is called Early Childhood Intervention. Have them do an evaluation. He may have issues with some textures and an occupational therapist could help. Or he could need a speech/ oral therapist. He may need some help leaning how to eat. My youngest has Sensory Integration Disorder and has an OT come to the house 2 times a month. She was also a little speech delayed, so she has a ST also. The ST came out and watched her eat and made sure she was doing everything right. K is still drooling and I was worried that her CP was effecting her mouth. Turns out, it is more her sensory stuff. K does not like grass. Even with shoes on, she won't go near it. Her OT and I have been working on it. Maybe there is a texture he does not like. And OT can help make suggestions about how to help him. I hope that helps.

Sarah, mom to Alexis, Samantha and Kayleigh


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Sarah, mom to Alexis, Samantha and Kayleigh


iVillage Member
Registered: 08-09-2008
In reply to: lizzyb1979
Wed, 04-21-2010 - 9:54am
Thanks! I think it may have something to do with grainy textures. He is fine with smooth stuff and crackers and such and will take 1 bite of anything. I have heard of people using OT's and may have to look into that. Need to see what is available in my area.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 05-03-2004
In reply to: lizzyb1979
Wed, 04-21-2010 - 1:00pm

I would NOT recommend cutting down on nursing and most LCs would not either.

I was not clear from your post are you feeding him or is he self feeding? Some children do best when they self feed (yes it is messy!). So offering finger food choices is something to try if you have not. This has some great ideas ( http://kellymom.com/nutrition/solids/finger-foods.html ), but my kids tend to make everything a finger food. lol!

This is also chock full of infor for nursing toddlers - how much should they be eating? Do thye "need" cows milk? etc http://kellymom.com/nutrition/solids/toddler-foods.html

Also a great book to check out is "My Child Won't Eat! How To Prevent and Solve The Problem" by Carlos Gonzalez MD - your library may have it.

I am not saying that an evaluation might not be in order but do not let them bully you into the thought that breastmilk is causing baby not to eat and you should wean. I ahve seen this a number of times. Keep in mind that the WHO, AAFP and other medical organizations recommend BF for a minimum of 2 years.

HTH!



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iVillage Member
Registered: 08-09-2008
In reply to: lizzyb1979
Wed, 04-21-2010 - 2:03pm

I wasn't very clear on his eating style, sorry! He will take finger foods sometimes. Other times it's just scattered on the floor. I'll give him blueberries, cut up strawberries, cereals. He'll also eat large pieces of fruit (apple, pear) in a mesh feeder (he loves it that way). I feed him yogurt with a spoon which he doesn't mind. One of my problems is, I just DON'T know what to fix him that he'll like and I don't want to resort to the staple unhealthy toddler foods. I'm being really picky (so far) about what he can eat. He can chew and bite and all that very well.


I probably don't even need to have soy milk available to him b/c he nurses so much when he's around me that it's probably just adding extra calories.


Weaning is not an option for us right now b/c I feel it is good for him. My family can stuff it! I am hoping to let him wean himself.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 04-28-2005
In reply to: lizzyb1979
Thu, 04-22-2010 - 8:10am

Could it be

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iVillage Member
Registered: 08-09-2008
In reply to: lizzyb1979
Thu, 04-22-2010 - 11:57am
I didn't introduce until after 6 months and he wasn't very receptive so I didn't push it. He started eating yogurt regulary around 7 months and loves it. I think his growing independence is making him reluctant to accept the spoon (except from my mother when it is yogurt).
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iVillage Member
Registered: 12-17-2007
In reply to: lizzyb1979
Thu, 04-22-2010 - 12:34pm

With as much as he is nursing no you do not need any other milk. As long as baby is nursing 3-4 times a day then no additional milks are needed.

Honestly the things he is eating sound great!!! Having food scattered on the floor is pretty normal and varied amounts eaten is normal too. I recall panicking with my oldest when all he would eat all day for days on end was a strawberry and a cracker (in addition to nursing) at one year old. Then one day he only wanted yogurt for a week or two. Now that he is 11 I long for him to eat less since he is as tall as I am and eats more than I do. lol! At one year of age we like to see no more than 25% of calories come from solids - the rest is breastmilk.

"Between ages one and five, a child's growth is in a decelerated stage; that is, they have slowed down in growth. Since growth slows down, their need for calories subsequently decreases, which in turn leads to a smaller quantity of food ingested per day. Added to the decelerated growth is a burgeoning independence which limits the variety of foods your child is willing to eat ("finicky eater"). Rest assured that toddlers do not need as much food as you might expect because of this slowing down of the growth rate. Three small meals and two snacks a day (and some will eat a good bit less) will probably be enough to fuel even the most active toddler. Please realize, too, that finicky eaters are the rule rather than the exception.

Some toddlers are eating very few solids, or even no solids, at 12 months. This is not unusual and really depends on your child - there is quite a big variation. We like to see breastmilk making up the majority (around 75%) of baby's diet at 12 months. Some babies will be taking more solids by 12 months, but others will still be exclusively or almost-exclusively breastfed at this point. It is normal for baby to keep breastmilk as the primary part of his diet up until 18 months or even longer. An example of a nice gradual increase in solids would be 25% solids at 12 months, 50% solids at 18 months, and 80% solids at 24 months.

Some children take a little longer to begin taking solids well. Some of them have food sensitivities and this may be their body's way of protecting them until their digestive system can handle more. Others are late teethers or have a lot of difficulty with teething pain. At this point there is NOTHING that your milk lacks that your child needs, with the possible exception of enough iron. As long as his iron levels are within acceptable levels and when he does eat you are offering him foods naturally rich in iron, then you have plenty of time before you need to worry about the amount of solids he's getting.

All you need to do is to continue to offer foods. Don't worry if he's not interested or takes very small amounts. Your only true responsibility is what you offer, when you offer it and how you offer it, not whether or not he eats it. That has to be up to him. Trying to force, coax, or cajole your child into eating is never recommended. Continue to nurse on demand, day and night, and trust your child to increase the solids when he's ready. As baby slowly moves into eating more solids, your milk will fill any nutritional gaps nicely. " http://www.kellymom.com/nutrition/solids/toddler-foods.html#howmuch

One thing I would do with yogurt is add cereal (like branflakes) and that helped it stick to the spoon so they could use the spoon themselves. Just a thought. Also have you tried chunks of Avocado? My kids like it with a bit of garlic on it. Also pasta with a bit of olive oil are a good choice.

Have you just tried letting him eat off your plate? That is mainly what we do here. My youngest will be 1 tomorrow. Yesterday for breakfast he self fed some egg yolk, and had some cut up pieces of a strawberry (he did not eat all of either one) and some sips of water. At lunch he had a piece of raw broccoli (I leave the stem long for a natural handle), and some small bits of roast beef (homemade not from the deli). At dinner we had whole wheat rotini and meatballs. I cut up one meatball and tossed a few rotini in olive oil. Keep in mind he did not eat all of anything I gave him - the dogs eat well at our house.

Don't be afraid to give things with lots of flavor. I do try to limit salt (for everyone) and since my 4 year old is a type 1 diabetic we use very little sugar. Since sugar is added to so many things I make a lot of things on my own (ie tomato sauce breads etc) so I have a lot of control over what is eaten. I make my own chili, but I make it mild (DH and I add some heat to our bowls) and my little guys love to eat the chili beans!.

Honestly it really sounds like things are going pretty well with variety and with texture too for you all. Hang in there! Remember you just need to offer a variety of healthy choices each day. IT is up to baby on what he eats.



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iVillage Member
Registered: 04-28-2005
In reply to: lizzyb1979
Thu, 04-22-2010 - 1:25pm
Wow, your 1 yo eats "real" food?!

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iVillage Member
Registered: 12-17-2007
In reply to: lizzyb1979
Thu, 04-22-2010 - 1:46pm

I have never bought or used ANY purees with any of my 3 children - we start with table foods when they are ready for solids. (ie when they grab food off my plate) There is nothing magical about jarred baby foods or purees. When babies start on solids at an appropriate time (ie after the age of 6 months) they can start with chunkier foods and many may prefer the chunkier foods and refuse purees.

"Older babies who are just starting solids may prefer chunkier finger foods, instead of mashed or moistened food. The baby who starts solids at 6 months or older doesn't need pureed or liquefied foods. You may want to just start with finger foods, and let her mostly feed herself.

How chunky can the food be? If your baby is not gagging & choking on the food, then the texture (table foods, etc.) is fine. Watch carefully the first few times your baby tries a new food to make sure she can handle it without gagging or choking. Always supervise your child when she is eating finger foods." http://www.kellymom.com/nutrition/solids/finger-foods.html



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iVillage Member
Registered: 09-10-2009
In reply to: lizzyb1979
Thu, 04-22-2010 - 1:49pm

Takingbabysteps, just curious why that's your plan at this point. I know your son had some special feeding needs which I can understand. What would be the advantage of continuing on purees until age 2?


Jason actually never ate purees. We tried and tried and he just never took more than a few bites. He was much more interested once we started giving him small bits of whatever was on our plates - bits of bread, pasta, rice, chicken or banana for instance. And he didn't grow his first tooth until 11 months either but never had issues gumming whatever we fed him.


I'm not doubting your decision, just trying to understand it better since it's not what we typically see, even with folks who delay starting solids.


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