how to mitigate cries?

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-10-2007
how to mitigate cries?
5
Wed, 11-04-2009 - 9:44am

Hi

I am a proud mama of two boys who could not be more different - so I feel like I am on a very steep learning curve wth number 2. DS1 was very mellow - we have an easy attachment parenting style that while we worked on it - was effortless b/c you could see how AP made parenting easier in the long run.

Fastfoward to #2 - we are still committed to AP - but wow - he came out crying and really has rarely stopped - he was better from 4 months to 6 months where we thought finally all of our constant. wearing, cosleeping, movement, whatever the kid needed was working - but now he has starting teething and he is one long cry! the worst is at night when he wakes up (at least once an hour) he goes right from asleep to a level 10 cry - it is so jarring for me - I eventually get him to back to sleep but by the time I am able to get back to sleep - he is awake again.

I am not sure what else to do - any ideas?

thrilled mama to DS 9-16-05


expecting #2 suprise late march early april

thrilled mama to DS 9-16-05

and DS 4-1-09
iVillage Member
Registered: 01-27-2006
Thu, 11-05-2009 - 12:36pm
For night time I'd give him a dose of motrin. If it's that painful for him he needs some relief. Then you can all sleep better. :) For day time give him something frozen to chew on. Get one of those mesh teethers and put a frozen grape it in. Or freeze a washcloth and let him chew on that. Good luck!

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iVillage Member
Registered: 01-30-2008
Fri, 11-06-2009 - 11:47am
I agree. Try Tylenol at night. Teething can be really rough on little guys. I know what you mean with the cry. Dominic still has a cry that can make your ears bleed. (Ok. not literally) When he first started going to daycare she almost called me to get him, sure that he must be in serious pain to be screaming like that. Eventually we realized, that's
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iVillage Member
Registered: 09-21-2007
Fri, 11-06-2009 - 2:55pm

((((((((hugs))))))))

My DD is a lot like your #2 and always has been. She's still taking a looonnnggg and painful time to finish up her 2 yr molars, and though we no longer (knock wood) have those nights of banshee screaming since she can verbalize better, we still have A LOT of sleepless nights. You're not alone - C used to do the exact same thing, waking up and going 0 to 60 with the intense, shrill cry.

All I can really say is keep on keepin' on, sounds like you're doing a great job trying to help him. I third the vote for tylenol/motrin if it helps you both get some sleep and him some relief. Have you tried any homeopathic remedies? We've had some luck with them, particularly the teething tablets and sometimes the plain Chamomilla.

Also I'd put in a word for the book "Raising Your Spirited Child" because I really wish I'd found it when C was an infant. Sounds like you likely have a spirited LO and that book is a godsend IMHO.

Hang in there mama! :)
~megan



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iVillage Member
Registered: 01-28-2007
Sun, 11-08-2009 - 4:25pm
We've had success with Hyland's teething tablets and frozen breastmilk (in a mesh feeder or as a slushie on a spoon).


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Lilypie 2nd Birthday Ticker

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-09-2007
Fri, 04-23-2010 - 7:10am

I know your post is months old now, but I had to share my experience and hope it will help you.

I have been taking DS to a cranio-sacral therapist, and a lot of what you mentioned sounds like your DS may have some pressure in his head. Our therapist says that babies who experience this cry a lot without apparent reason, need to be moved often (as this relieves the pressure), need to be held, are light sleepers, and find teething very difficult because the already-stressed facial bones are not in the right alignment for the teeth to erupt.
These babies often crawl or walk early, because they get relief from physical movement. They go on to become difficult toddlers, although by the time they can talk they have become accustomed to the discomfort and don't complain of pain.

Cranio-sacral therapy involves very subtle manipulation of the bones of the skull (approximately the pressure of a coin on the head) that releases blockages and allows cerebrospinal fluid to flow more appropriately.

You may want to read up a little about it.

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