Summer and DD14.....

Community Leader
Registered: 08-25-2006
Summer and DD14.....
13
Thu, 06-19-2014 - 2:22pm

What do you have your DD14 doing this summer. (Or the like, or in the past, etc. etc.)

Go ahead and throw out even the most obvious of ideas (I already have two that are grown. but they are 25 and 28).  Not going to list my DD's plans or my ideas, curious what is thrown out.  Not just for me, but also for those who lurk but don't post.  

Serenity

Serenity

Pages

Avatar for suzyk2118
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-30-1997
Mon, 06-23-2014 - 2:39pm

http://www.ymcastlouis.org/sites/default/files/editor/files/WC%20CIT%20Program%20Application%202014.pdf

Looks like it went up to $150 for 4 weeks.

Mine never liked overnight camp either; just did it when absolutely required for scouts.  The summer between 8th grade and high school he took Health and PE at the high school to get those out of the way, so that took some of his time too.

Sue

Community Leader
Registered: 08-25-2006
Mon, 06-23-2014 - 2:06pm
She can't "work" at the Y until she is 15. So pretty common for kids to do CIT two summers in a row. She is on the mature side of 14, I guess you could say. So although hanging out with friends is better than being on an ipad all day, it also brings about potential problems. So don't want her running around town all day unsupervised, but also don't want her hibernating in the house all day on her ipad. (or phone, or tv, or what have you). Anywho, thanks again everyone...
Serenity
Community Leader
Registered: 07-26-1999
Fri, 06-20-2014 - 2:39pm
I gree its definitely a hard age. Are you still working part time Serenity? The YMCA's around here have junior counselor camps that teenagers can "work" at and get experience. What about volunteering at different places, the animal shelter, the library, etc.? ODD did sports so she was in practices 4 days a week for about 7 hours a day during the summer, other than that she would hang out with friends or stay home and read a lot. She always used summer as her fun reading list time, as well as a 3 week vacation to grandma and grandpa's house.
Photobucket
Community Leader
Registered: 08-25-2006
Fri, 06-20-2014 - 2:18pm

Wow!  So excited to see how many replies are here this morning!  A few new ideas and a lot of what I have already encountered either with my two older kids or my now DD14.

Good to know I am not really missing anything.  They are at an akward summer age.  Yes, most camps end at 8th grade and if you are not already advancing in some activity, most high school camps assume that you are.  

She did CIT last summer and is doing it again this year.  But (not sure where it is $50 for 5 weeks) like another poster said, it is $300 for two weeks.  Next summer though, she can actually work there at 15.   She has now officially outgrown all of the YMCA's day camps.  She is not big on overnight camp, cost aside.

We do have some planned chores and have thrown some home business ideas out to her.  She will spending at least half of the summer at her dads.  So some advantages, and disadvantages to that.  

I remember my son pretty much outside on his bike or playing video games.  We used to have a tiny, tiny amusment park here, but unfortunately it closed years ago.  It was perfect for this age group to hang out for the day.  They even had summer passes.  He also did really well mowing yards and he reminded me the other day that he used to fix other kids bikes.  

Both my big kids also started driving and working at 16.  

Thanks again everyone!  

Serenity

Serenity
iVillage Member
Registered: 05-08-2006
Fri, 06-20-2014 - 12:03pm
14 and 15 are hard summer ages....I think a few house chores that she has to do are good...laundry, make her bed, load/unload the dishwasher. If she wants to earn money, then babysitting, dog walking, car washing are good. A lot depends on her interests. If she likes to write, keeping a journal is good...to explore her computer skills, maybe building a family website? If she is interested in family, make a family tree? Or volunteer at a local historic site? If she is comfortable with older people, volunteer at a local senior center or nursing home? Your local library might run programs she can help with. If she likes nature, a photographic journal of the world around her? If she likes exercise, maybe a running group or schedule regular tennis, basketball, whatever? The towns around here have recreation basketball in the summer, and although some kids are good, some are beginners. Let her plan and prepare one or two meals a week, looking on line or in cookbooks for recipes? Read the same book at the same time and discuss it? Make a music video? Is there a house project you have been meaning to tackle? Anything from painting a room to sorting through boxes in the cellar or attic? Engage her in that, working together to complete it. Teach her to sew? Or if she already knows, make a new outfit or curtains for her room. If you don't know how, you can maybe find a freind, or a freind's parent, to teach her. My mother spent time one summer teaching her great niece how to knit and I think they both enjoyed the time together. There are lots of crafts that are fun - beading,, scrap booking - match her interest to one and then see what resources are available to help her learn.
Avatar for turtletime
iVillage Member
Registered: 05-13-1998
Fri, 06-20-2014 - 10:48am

DS 13 had his least day of 8th grade yesterday. Post high school activities can be difficult in our area. The "let's try something new" camps that were so readily available through 8th grade turn into "let's specialize" camps. For example, my son wants to try a basketball camp but he's only been playing a year and while doing well, not the elite player the high school programs focus on. The casual robotics camps he's always loved are now only available at the university and they are thousands of dollars. Not happening.

At this point, DS is taking 2 weeks of theatre camp and rehearsing a show that will take him through mid-July at his youth theatre. A new season of YMCA basketball starts not long after that. He's continuing with Tae Kwon Do and every summer they add a weapons class which he digs on. He'll do a rock band camp at the community college if I can manage to get him in (he just announced his interest.) He starts school August 25th so a shorter summer than we are used to.

DD17 is going off to college mid-August and so made a "bucket-list" of things she wants to do before leaving. We plan on working through them together for some family time. She's working most days. She is rehearsing a different show that will take her through the week before she leaves. Of course, her boyfriend and her have a lot of plans.I

In general, I found  quality teen summer activities at our local zoo, youth theatre, and through the community college (and of course universities but we could never afford them.) I encourage the kids to make summer wish lists which usually include things like "go kayaking on the lake" or "go downtown for some Ghiradelli sundaes." 

Avatar for suzyk2118
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-30-1997
Fri, 06-20-2014 - 8:51am

Although at 7.25 or so an hour (pretax) for lifeguarding around here, ds would not recommend it as you cannot talk to anyone (at any of the pools he guarded at) - said it played with your head to sit there for hours, constantly keeping a close eye on people but only getting to talk to them if they were doing something against the rules...

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-08-2009
Thu, 06-19-2014 - 10:44pm

I assume your DD is between 8th and 9th grades.  During the summers prior to 9th, 10th, 11th, and 12th grades our daughters and their guys attended summer classes together, and mowed lawns together around the neighborhood because early on it was the only job available to them and in the last two summers it paid around $13 per hour vs $8 for real jobs at the mall or flipping hamburgers.  (Yes, they are greedy.  LOL).  They also found it easier to build that summer employment around classes, study, and spending time down at the local waterpark with friends.

Something that might pay even better is operating a car detailing service on the front drive of your home.  Have you seen what they charge for that service?  Walking dogs during the day, while the owners are at work, can also be quite lucrative.  Pool care is another possibility. 

The pay is better for these “home businesses” because you are not only working, but also managing a small business.  One of the hard parts, but also good training in life, is asking for and being turned down as you ask for the work. Ours started mowing our lawn and a few others the year before and could use those earlier few lawns as references. 

(I know of one pool care operator who has a master’s degree because pool cleaning pays quite well, if you have enough accounts.  In the extended circle of family and friends is a guy who left an engineering job at Texas Instruments to run popcorn stand at a downtown office building complex because popcorn paid about double what he was earning at Texas Instruments.  I hope our kids don’t end up using their degrees that way. LOL)   

Suzy, for what it's worth, one of Ronald Reagans early jobs was a lifeguard; a job that was very important in his formative years.  Some historians believe he saw his role as President as a type of lifeguard. 

Avatar for suzyk2118
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-30-1997
Thu, 06-19-2014 - 7:20pm

At 15 ds trained to be a lifeguard and did that for over 5 years including during the school year.  They didn't give hmi a ton of hours (20 during summers, tops, and 8-12 during the school year) but it was good at the time; many kids couldn't find anything.

Avatar for sabrtooth
iVillage Member
Registered: 12-03-1999
Thu, 06-19-2014 - 5:48pm

At 14, both kids had band camp from 8-noon.  On days they didn't have band, they served as camp counselors for the summer camp at the local park district, which they did for community service.  In the afternoons, they worked, doing daycare in the client's home.  The client for the older dd had 3 kids, the client for the younger had 2.  They also did light housework, and started dinner for the families. 

Once they turned 16, they worked full time in the summers, and part-time during the school year.  Older dd at Natural Wonders in the mall, working up to asst manager before the chain went bankrupt.  Then she worked as a barista, first at a local coffee house, then for Borders.  She worked for Borders all thru college, and beyond, untill she found a teaching job.

Younger dd worked at a local rib pit from the time she was 16 untill she was 20, finishing as a floor supervisor.  Then she began working full time as a receptionist/secretary in the Loop, while finishing J.C. at night.  At 21, she found a job 900 miles away, in the same town as her Navy fiancee, and left home for 3 years.

Pages