Would you read the new version of an old tale?

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-28-2005
Would you read the new version of an old tale?
2
Wed, 01-05-2011 - 12:42pm

They're working on a new version of 'Huckleberry Finn' to omit the N word. Do you think it's okay to use the word 'slave' instead and omit the word 'injun'? Would Mark Twain be rolling over in his grave? Would a simple 'revised' on the cover be enough?

New edition of 'Huckleberry Finn' to lose the N-word

http://www.cnn.com/2011/SHOWBIZ/01/04/new.huck.finn.ew/index.html

(EW.com) -- What is a word worth? According to Publishers Weekly, NewSouth Books' upcoming edition of Mark Twain's seminal novel "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" will remove all instances of the N-word -- I'll give you a hint, it's not nonesuch -- present in the text and replace it with slave.

The new book will also remove usage of the word Injun. The effort is spearheaded by Twain expert Alan Gribben, who says his PC-ified version is not an attempt to neuter the classic but rather to update it.


iVillage Member
Registered: 03-01-2003
Mon, 01-10-2011 - 6:07am
I can understand removing the N word. I don't see why "injun" has to be changed since I see that more as an accented version of "indian" and not as derogatory.

However, I think the books should be clearly labeled as REVISED and I think the original Twain copy should also be available for purchase and not replaced by the revised. It's a part of history and pretending that certain things didn't happen or that certain words didn't exist just isn't right. It's a slippery slope to deny the past.

 photo sigjun2010.jpg

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-28-2005
Mon, 01-10-2011 - 3:53pm

That's pretty much exactly what I was thinking, Jennifer!