Are You Ready for Change?

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Registered: 09-25-2010
Are You Ready for Change?
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Wed, 01-26-2011 - 12:17am




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iVillage Member
Registered: 10-07-2008
Wed, 01-26-2011 - 12:31am

Did not realize that it had so much parts to the quiz.

I think it said I am on my way to change .

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iVillage Member
Registered: 09-25-2010
Wed, 01-26-2011 - 12:33am

HOw many parts ?
Did you take them all
OK redo & I wil see it in the morning :)
I will try it in morning :)




iVillage Member
Registered: 10-07-2008
Wed, 01-26-2011 - 12:36am
Yes about 3 to 4. Should have copied them
let me do it again.
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-07-2008
Wed, 01-26-2011 - 12:42am

1st part...

Your Self-Awareness:
Although you may feel ready for change, you aren't as mentally prepared as you could be. Perhaps you aren't convinced it's really necessary to change at this point. Or maybe you underestimate the sacrifices that lie ahead. The goal (say, breaking up with a toxic friend) may seem fantastic, but the reality (you'll feel lonely for a while) may tempt you to retreat. It's important to carefully consider your expectations. One useful technique for developing greater self-awareness is "tracking." All you need to do is spend one minute a day jotting down notes about your current frustrations, level of motivation, and any new hopes, doubts, or fears. This exercise forces subconscious feelings to the surface, so you can process them.

2nd part...

Your Perspective
Fortunately, you have the wonderful ability to keep your efforts in context. Everyone who tries to alter a habit will experience times of doubt, anger, and desperation. But perspective allows you to see past those times to the rewards that will come later.

3rd part...

Your Strategic Approach You tackle problems with a thought-out plan—which is great. Studies show that people who use strategies are most successful at behavior change. But as you know, even the best-laid plans can fall apart; be aware that you may need to revise your tactics along the way.

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Registered: 09-25-2010
Wed, 01-26-2011 - 12:45am

Looks great & helpful,
Morning ofr me to do it though :)




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Registered: 09-25-2010
Thu, 01-27-2011 - 12:06am

So far for me ..


Your Self-Awareness:
Although you may feel ready for change, you aren't as mentally prepared as you could be. Perhaps you aren't convinced it's really necessary to change at this point. Or maybe you underestimate the sacrifices that lie ahead. The goal (say, breaking up with a toxic friend) may seem fantastic, but the reality (you'll feel lonely for a while) may tempt you to retreat. It's important to carefully consider your expectations. One useful technique for developing greater self-awareness is "tracking." All you need to do is spend one minute a day jotting down notes about your current frustrations, level of motivation, and any new hopes, doubts, or fears. This exercise forces subconscious feelings to the surface, so you can process them

Your Perspective
Fortunately, you have the wonderful ability to keep your efforts in context. Everyone who tries to alter a habit will experience times of doubt, anger, and desperation. But perspective allows you to see past those times to the rewards that will come later

Your Strategic Approach You tackle problems with a thought-out plan—which is great. Studies show that people who use strategies are most successful at behavior change. But as you know, even the best-laid plans can fall apart; be aware that you may need to revise your tactics along the way

This is all good for me .. glad I did this :)




iVillage Member
Registered: 07-09-2001
Thu, 01-27-2011 - 12:01pm

Your Self-Awareness:
Although you may feel ready for change, you aren't as mentally prepared as you could be. Perhaps you aren't convinced it's really necessary to change at this point. Or maybe you underestimate the sacrifices that lie ahead. The goal (say, breaking up with a toxic friend) may seem fantastic, but the reality (you'll feel lonely for a while) may tempt you to retreat. It's important to carefully consider your expectations. One useful technique for developing greater self-awareness is "tracking." All you need to do is spend one minute a day jotting down notes about your current frustrations, level of motivation, and any new hopes, doubts, or fears. This exercise forces subconscious feelings to the surface, so you can process them.

Your Perspective
When things don't go smoothly, you may become irritable more quickly than most people, which can drive you to self-defeating behavior—whether that means tearing into a quart of ice cream or picking a fight with your partner. This pattern is problematic when you're trying to make a change because you have to keep going when you most want to quit. Building that kind of patience requires practice. Whenever you find yourself about to boil over, experiment with relaxation techniques: Get a change of scenery. Say a prayer. Make a cup of tea. Find the irony and force yourself to laugh. These tactics all do the same thing—they allow you to pause and see a frustrating situation as the temporary setback it is.

Your Strategic Approach You tackle problems with a thought-out plan—which is great. Studies show that people who use strategies are most successful at behavior change. But as you know, even the best-laid plans can fall apart; be aware that you may need to revise your tactics along the way.





 




iVillage Member
Registered: 10-16-2002
Thu, 01-27-2011 - 12:32pm

I didn't notice an answer on the first one, I did the 2nd one and here is the result:

Your Perspective
Fortunately, you have the wonderful ability to keep your efforts in context. Everyone who tries to alter a habit will experience times of doubt, anger, and desperation. But perspective allows you to see past those times to the rewards that will come later.

I was surprised at this result.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 09-25-2010
Thu, 01-27-2011 - 3:26pm
ludam wrote:

Your Self-Awareness:
Although you may feel ready for change, you aren't as mentally prepared as you could be. Perhaps you aren't convinced it's really necessary to change at this point. Or maybe you underestimate the sacrifices that lie ahead. The goal (say, breaking up with a toxic friend) may seem fantastic, but the reality (you'll feel lonely for a while) may tempt you to retreat. It's important to carefully consider your expectations. One useful technique for developing greater self-awareness is "tracking." All you need to do is spend one minute a day jotting down notes about your current frustrations, level of motivation, and any new hopes, doubts, or fears. This exercise forces subconscious feelings to the surface, so you can process them.

Your Perspective
When things don't go smoothly, you may become irritable more quickly than most people, which can drive you to self-defeating behavior—whether that means tearing into a quart of ice cream or picking a fight with your partner. This pattern is problematic when you're trying to make a change because you have to keep going when you most want to quit. Building that kind of patience requires practice. Whenever you find yourself about to boil over, experiment with relaxation techniques: Get a change of scenery. Say a prayer. Make a cup of tea. Find the irony and force yourself to laugh. These tactics all do the same thing—they allow you to pause and see a frustrating situation as the temporary setback it is.

Your Strategic Approach You tackle problems with a thought-out plan—which is great. Studies show that people who use strategies are most successful at behavior change. But as you know, even the best-laid plans can fall apart; be aware that you may need to revise your tactics along the way.

It kind of fits you ludam,
Don't you think ?




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iVillage Member
Registered: 09-25-2010
Thu, 01-27-2011 - 3:27pm
jammin2bach wrote:

I didn't notice an answer on the first one, I did the 2nd one and here is the result:

Your Perspective
Fortunately, you have the wonderful ability to keep your efforts in context. Everyone who tries to alter a habit will experience times of doubt, anger, and desperation. But perspective allows you to see past those times to the rewards that will come later.

I was surprised at this result.




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