Cloth Diapering?

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-27-2004
Cloth Diapering?
14
Sat, 09-01-2012 - 10:40pm

I know it's early, but I won't be working after I have the baby, so I'm considering cloth diapers (again).  I never really cloth diapered before, but I know in the long run, it will be cheaper than "sposies."

Have any of you BTDT, and if so, what brands and types did you use? 

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Avatar for cmkristy
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-05-2005
Fri, 09-07-2012 - 8:18am
Hi ladies,

I wanted to share a link with you all to the Diapering topic here on iVillage. If you have any more questions or are looking for additional feedback and advice, the board is a great place to visit! I'm sure they'd love to hear from you!

Diapering- http://forums.ivillage.com/ivillage/?category.id=iv-ppdiapering

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iVillage Member
Registered: 10-17-2009
Re: Cloth Diapering?
Fri, 09-07-2012 - 10:21am
We are thinking about using cloth with this baby :smileyhappy: it is our 2nd and last. I'm leaning towards prefolds right now. I think we will get snappis and covers and see what works best for us.
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iVillage Member
Registered: 08-28-2006
Re: Cloth Diapering?
Mon, 09-10-2012 - 12:16am

Ok, so i might be upsetting the apple cart here...but this was my math. Also know that my figures are in Australian Dollars. I have done the maths for "expensive, popular branded" disposables as that is what 90% of people tend to use but I also did it for the cheaper "home branded" disposables.

Ok, here goes.

Someone mentioned Gro-via. I did my research. They recommend 50 nappies. But for years use you will need twice that amount since wear and tear will mean you need a second "set part way thru your nappying experience. Following amounts are for estimated 2 years worth which includes 28 shells, 10 boosters for nap use (which is minimal in my mind) and 72 soaker pads. $23.50 per shell, $25.50 per soaker pad and $15.00 per booster. Also add their recommended detergent...$160 for 2 years worth if you are doing one load per day as recommended. Comes to a whopping $2806.80

One of the most recommended cloth nappies in Australia are Peapods, which is the other brand i did the maths for. These come in 4 sizes from newborn to about 2 years old. You need minimum 10 nappies per day and at least 2 days worth. One to use and one in the was and or drying. All up $1599.60 in total for nappies and $408.48 for cost of recommended detergent.

None of these costs take into account your time, extra power used for washing everyday or the fact that there is some inconvenience involved when out and about. Also add the cost of occasional dispossables for when baby sitters don't wish to use cloth.

The more costly dispossables cost $2379.90. The cheaper brand $826.20. This is calculated as follows. 5 sizes from newborn thru to walker. Newborn size 10 nappies per day. Infant 8 nappies per day. Crawler, toddler and walker 6 nappies per day. This change information was taken from a number of mummies in a small survey i took part in as to how often they changed their babies.

I have not included cost of wipes as you use wipes whether you use cloth or dispossable. I've not included any other nappy changing costs like balm, rash cream or powder etc cause they are personal choice.

One more thing to think about...cloth nappies need a minimum of 6 hours drying time in the sun to retain their absorbancy qualities and for sanitisation. Most cloth nappies you can not sanitize using bleach, whiteners or other germ killing detergents, so they must go in the sun. Where I live in the winter you'd be lucky to be able to dry them in a full day of sun cause it's so cold and damp and you can not put cloth nappies in a tumble dryer. So, in winter, cloth might be impossible for some of you.

HAVING SAID ALL THAT, I salute all you dedicated mummies who cloth diaper their babies. My personal preference is not to. But I sincerely wish I had the money and circumstances to cloth nappy my babies...it truely is my heart's wish. That is why I put in so many hours of research into doing these sums when I was preg with my first baby. But I just cant.

Enjoy.

Candice

 

 BabyFruit Ticker
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-05-2006
Mon, 09-10-2012 - 11:47am

I didn't find cloth diapering to be that expensive. I think that was absolutely the top of what you would need. 

 

This is from the Real Diaper Association.org. 

 

Cloth Diapers.  For cloth diapering, each family will probably need about 6 dozen diapers10.  The cost of cloth diapering can vary considerably, from as low as $300 for a basic set-up of prefolds and covers11, to $1000 or more for organic cotton fitted diapers and wool covers.  Despite this large price range, it should be possible to buy a generous mix of prefolds and diaper covers for about $300, most of which will probably last for two children.  This means the cost of cloth diapering is about one tenth the cost of disposables12, and you can spend even less by using found objects (old towels & T-shirts).

 


And this is from me!

 

I think what you have to realize is that there are a million different kinds of cloth diapers out there and their prices range from cheap to very expensive. Take a prefold diaper from walmart and it costs $11 dollars for 12 of them. Then all you need is 3 covers a day at $6 dollars each for the cheapest ones and viola, you can cloth diaper for pennies!

Then you have the really expensive diapers. the organic, the all-in-one super nifty, tons of bells and whistles kind of diapers that can be $30+ dollars a pop. But you also have to keep in mind that these diapers last and last. The diaper assoc. says you should be able to take them through 2 children. And then people often sell them second hand because they still have some life! 

So the idea of it costing almost $3000 dollars and that they won't last through a child is not accurate in my opinion. 

I would say that you can cloth diaper from $300-$500 dollars. You don't need a lot of diapers either. You can buy the expensive all-in-one's or hybrid diapers for when you go out or for daycare. You'll probably need 6 a day. You can buy them as a one size fits all and you never have to buy them again. They fit 8-30 pounds. So using Grovia whose covers cost $16.95 but unless there is a #2 diaper, you can re-use the shells and just change the insert. They say that each shell should have 3 inserts. The inserts are $9 dollars appiece. You should probably have 2 days worth of diapers so you would need 12 inserts and 4 covers totalling $175.50 for the diaper life of the child. Then you will need some heavy duty overnight diapers (but a lot of mothers choose disposables at night - the nighttime disposables - because it keeps the baby warm and dry so they don't wake up). NIghtTime diapers might consist of a fitted diaper, a soaker and a wool cover as wool absorbs 3 times it's weight in liquid (or something like that). Wool covers are expensive $30-50 dollars but you only need one! When you hang wool up to dry after the night, the lanolin in the wool neutralizes and disinfects the urine so you don't even have to wash a wool cover until it gets soiled.

AND when you are at home, you can just have the baby run around in anything, a fitted diaper without a cover, a prefold with a cover...whatever! Those are cheap! The diaper assoc suggests 6 dozen diapers, but I think that's a little excessive. Each person will develop their own preference because it depends on how often you do laundry. I do laundry everyday and the cloth diaper laundry probably gets done every other day as you don't really want those hanging around to smolder! So I'm going to start off with 3 dozen diapers of all different kinds. I'm going to buy them on sale or used as well so that cuts down the cost tremendously. AND, you can consign them afterwards and get some of your money back.

As far as the sun and washing goes. You really only need the sun for the stained diapers and you can definitely use the dryer. I cloth diapered in a condo with no access to the outside and I never used the sun to dry my diapers and it worked out fine.

This is only coming from my own personal experience with cloth. Everyone is going to be different. I anticipate spending $500 on diapers and I anticipate selling them for at least $100 dollars when I'm done.

Abbie

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-17-2009
Mon, 09-10-2012 - 2:09pm
We are going to start buying soon ! I would love for you to share any deals you find Kate :smileyhappy:
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iVillage Member
Registered: 08-28-2006
Mon, 09-10-2012 - 7:17pm

Hi Abbie.

Didn't mean to get anyone off side or post misleading information. I totally agree with you. There are MUCH cheaper ways of cloth diapering than the ones I mentioned. I did Gro-Via cause someone else mentioned them in an earlier post. I was dismayed to see that while in the US they are quite cheap, Even if you were to need twice the recommended amount of nappies, But to get that brand here "downunder" is so so much more expensive. I don't understand why but at least 2 times the amount dollar wise. (Don't get me started on how unfair that is because our dollar is almost as strong as yours) I did say I did my sums in Aussie Dollars. I looked at the Aussie Gro-Via website for prices. Even if you only buy the amount that they recommend (50) I'd still be looking at about 1500 Aussie dollars.

I looked at Peapods cause they very popular here in Aus and one of the cheaper cloth nappying brands available. babybeehinds is another similar brand and their prices comparable. That is IF you are wanting that type of system. Which is what I would look at. If you are going for cotton prefolds and a few covers, as you stated, then the whole thing is very affordable. But I don't personally know anyone here who'd go back to that. All the cloth mummies I know do hemp or bamboo liners, soakers and boosters with fancy new fangled covers with snaps etc. Like you said, lots of bells and whistles. Like Peapods. And they are expensive. But so cute....anyhow....

Plus Peapod site says not to put them in the dryer as they won't last. Unless they've changed their policy...i'll look it up cause that would make my life considerably easier.

But here's another question that maybe yourself or another BTDT mummy might be able to answer for me....

Have any of you used cloth just for the toilet training stage? That would interest me!

I have read a few good things about this way of toilet training and am intrigued. 

Candice

 

 

 BabyFruit Ticker
iVillage Member
Registered: 08-18-2008
Mon, 09-10-2012 - 9:42pm

I absolutely HATE disposable pull-ups.  With both of my children I used cloth training pants and vinyl covers.  I had no problems with potty training the kids, especially my oldest who hated being wet, as they were easy enough for the kids to pull up/down.  In many ways they were easier for the kids to use than pull-ups. 

My oldest  potty trained at 16 months simply cause she figured out that if she went on the pottychair she didn't have to deal with being wet.  My second child wasn't even interested in potty training until he was almost 3. 

When I was potty training my 2nd, during that summer when it was warm enough (we were in Germany) I would have him wear nothing expect the cloth training pants and maybe a t-shirt at home to make it even easier for undressing to use the potty chair.

Lisa

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-28-2006
Mon, 09-10-2012 - 10:45pm
Thanks Lisa. Sounds good. I know I've seen a few things about using cloth for toilet training...keen to give it a go.

Candice
 BabyFruit Ticker