Vaccinating

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-16-2008
Vaccinating
5
Thu, 03-15-2012 - 1:28pm

I strongly encourage EVERYONE to do their own research and come to your own conclusions about anything--in this case, vaccines seem to be the hot topic. That way, you've decided if you should vaccinate fully on schedule, follow a delayed schedule, or not vaccinate at all.

In my case, DS is fully vaccinated. I have a cousin with a genetic syndrome, and even a common cold could turn deadly for her. I can't bring myself to take the chance that we could pass something to her (and she's vaccinated as well). She currently needs a liver transplant but her heart can't handle it. She needs another heart surgery, but her lungs can't handle it. Something like whooping cough would kill her. Our family vaccinates. I have nothing against people who choose not to. It just isn't the right choice for our family.

I will add that I'm scared of the Gardasil vaccine. I still fall into the age group who should have it/get it, but I haven't.

by sara photo sigbysara.jpg
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-29-2008
In reply to: cavenyee
Thu, 03-15-2012 - 2:08pm
My husband and I made the choice to vaccinate our child. I agree with you regarding the Gardasil vaccine. I have read to many scary things regarding the life long side effects of Gardasi.
Monica
Lilypie Kids Birthday tickers
iVillage Member
Registered: 08-10-1999
In reply to: cavenyee
Thu, 03-15-2012 - 6:39pm
There is a reason people vaccinate... polio, rubella etc., these diseases are not to be taken lightly. The more people who don't vaccinate, the higher risk for outbreaks and disease mutations which could become vaccine/medicine resistant.

That said, I do have friends whose children have had severe reactions to vaccinations. If you know that your family is more likely to react then talk to your doctors. They can space out the vaccines, they can help you plan what will be best for your family.

If you have an allergic reaction to an antibiotic that doesn't mean you never take an antibiotic again; just because you are allergic to one doesn't mean you are allergic to all. The same holds for vaccines... if you can space out the vaccinations you will find the ones that your family is sensitive to and you can go from there. There are ways to "detox" from a vaccine reaction. It is irresponsible to carte blanche refuse to vaccinate.

And I view it as slightly hypocritical because you are banking on everyone vaccinating to keep your children safe.

 


 


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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-07-2012
In reply to: cavenyee
Thu, 03-15-2012 - 6:50pm
We vaccinate, large part is school requirements. If the public schools were decent, we'd reconsider, but it's private for us so vaccinations are required.

Done my research and we do what is best for us.
Community Leader
Registered: 02-06-2006
In reply to: cavenyee
Fri, 03-16-2012 - 11:19am
Courtney - I agree with your post completely.

And the argument that vaxers shouldn't care what non-vaxers do, because we have the immunity from the vaccines anyway is bs. It does matter to me that the most defenseless and frail among us (newborns, the elderly, immune comprised individuals, etc.) are more likely to fall ill & die from these utterly preventable diseases as the non-vaccinated population rises.

I think we are too far removed, generation-wise, for people to have a true understanding of the horrors of the some of the diseases we've essentially eradicated from the general population through vaccinations. We never had to see children slowly choking to death and/or living in iron lung machines when polio paralzyed their chest muscles. We didn't live during the time when our president was in a wheelchair because polio had destroyed his ability to walk. We've never seen someone with blue skin & his neck swollen to larger than the size of his face from diptheria. None of us are partnered with men who, or will have to tell our sons some day that they, cannot have children because mumps rendered them sterile.

I DO question the amount of vaccines we now give children, the necessity of some of them (like flu, gardasil and chicken pox), but to just dismiss them out of hand as evil and like, some sort of conspiracy is insanity.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 09-08-2011
In reply to: cavenyee
Fri, 03-23-2012 - 5:09pm

We do vaccines.

Momma to:
Madelyn, February 26, 2001
Aaron, January 2, 2005
Baby #3, October 2, 2012