Advice about summer--anyone else a litte aprehensive about no supervision?

Avatar for comountainsprite
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Advice about summer--anyone else a litte aprehensive about no supervision?
9
Sun, 05-08-2011 - 2:39am

A year ago, I wasn't too worried about the fact that dd was going to be home alone all summer long with me just checking in via phone while I was working.

iVillage Member
Registered: 11-28-1999

Rose, that's kind of funny--my kids did always sleep kind of late and you're right--if they are in bed asleep, at least they aren't doing anything wrong.

Avatar for comountainsprite
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003

LOL. You know, she does have night owl tendencies and regularly stays up waaay too late reading whenever she's involved in a book (thankfully she's like me in that regard--a voracious reader). And, while it may not be popular advice, it is practical.

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-16-1999

This is probably going to be a rather unpopular suggestion, but, does your DD have night owl tendencies?

Avatar for comountainsprite
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003

Thanks, good ideas.

iVillage Member
Registered: 11-28-1999

Well not everyone can afford to quit their jobs--I certainly can't since I'm a single mother & I don't work close enough to home to just drop in.

Avatar for sabrtooth
iVillage Member
Registered: 12-03-1999

Since you left another family with the responsibility of taking your child out along with theirs, returning her home, and supervising her, while you were in a bar and unable to go and get her, you can hardly hold HER responsible, if the other family changed where they took her.

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-14-2000

It's a tough age when they are too old for daycare but too young for a 'real' job. Sue had some good suggestions. Others might be seeing if she can be a mothers helper part of the week to a stay home mom, talking to some of her friends' moms that stay home and see if she can hang out there for a day a week or a few hours a few days a week. Any way you and your dh can flex your hours or do some telecommuting so her time home is more limited? Do you work close enough that you can pop in unexpectedly to make sure she's home? I was fortunate enough to be able to quit my job when the boys were 12 and 9; a big reason was because of the thought of them home alone in the summer. Good luck and hopefully you'll get some more suggestions here.

Pam
Avatar for comountainsprite
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Thanks, for the suggestions. I am looking into volunteer suggestions--especially since she piped up last week and mentioned that she's open to doing community service work. In fact she's volunteering next Sat. (getting up at early to be at the school at 7 to do clean up work). Actually that particular thing was one of those moments where it was like -- dang it, there's the kid I used to know. Sigh.

I'm also checking into possibilities for school since she is starting HS in the fall.

Oh, and just a clarification on the whole movie incident and why she was able to not do what she said she was going to. We were going to be gone by the time she was to be home because my husband is in a band and had a gig (I go along to support him, carry equipment and act as designated driver to make sure he gets home safe. I know that may sound bad but there's a certain amount of imbibing that tends to go with the territory and even if he's being cautious, it's just a go idea to be on the safe side and be responsible.) Anyway, it was her birthday weekend and none of the other possible plans with friends had gelled since it also happened to be Easter weekend due to friends' family/religious obligations so I said that if her friend's dad was willing to take the girls to and from the event, she could go. Apparently, their understanding was that they could do both--the movie and Kids Nite Out--but after the movie it was too late to do both. But dd knew full well that I hadn't given consent to both so that was why that was an issue. The only saving grace in both cases was that she was honest (after the fact of course) about what she'd actually done so at least I got it straight from her instead of finding out the hard way.

Anyway, thank you again for your ideas and support. It's such a hard age and seems a lot harder than when I was a kid. Partly because I honestly didn't ever test the waters--course that might be because I was trying to raise my mom instead of the other way around. Ever tried to ground a 34 year old? ; ) And, I grew up in the middle of nowhere so the logistics of me not being at home if my folks weren't was pretty much impossible until I was old enough to drive. There wasn't any Internet, cell phones, etc. at that time.
Avatar for suzyk2118
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-30-1997
Not sure about logistics, but any chance you can get her to volunteer anywhere for the bulk of the week? I know they do training for summer camp leaders for that age around here (church, YMCA, park district, community center, etc.), or they take volunteers at the Humane Society, etc. At that age, ds18 used to help teach art classes at a local studio, in return getting free 'tuition' for the teen classes which were later in the day. Babysitting is a good option too. If she's in HS or going into HS, at least here there's the option of taking a class or two, which fills 8 weeks - ds took PE and health over the summer before he started HS, then history classes the next 2 summers to get them overwith. Check at the school - our HS often listed local help wanted ads for teens. Good luck!

Sue