Do you monitor what your teen posts on facebook?

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-30-2003
Do you monitor what your teen posts on facebook?
9
Mon, 11-07-2011 - 2:51pm

Here's a link to the local story http://www.wvec.com/my-city/chesapeake/Chesapeake-student-suspended-for-threatening-post-on-Facebook-133365228.html

I just wonder if her parents had the talk of "You need to watch what you put on facebook.".

Avatar for cmlisab
iVillage Member
Registered: 09-30-2011
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-30-2003
Wed, 11-09-2011 - 12:39pm

Just an update.

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-08-2009

Never post anything on the internet that you would not want your grandparents to see?

Once out there it can't be totally removed.

Our kids were never big into FB, but I think if your kid is, you need to see everything.

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-27-1998

Yep, I have the same approach you do. I don't monitor what my kids post. Sometimes they'll ask me to come and look at stuff their friends have posted (videos, comments, etc.) and I use those to talk about how public FB really is.

Yesterday, my 14 yo DS asked me to scroll thru a dialogue he had had with a girl to determine whether I think she really likes him. :) There are things I worry about with them, of course, but FB postings aren't among them.

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-16-1999

Daddy said "she didn't mean it as a credible threat" - and I'm sure the Columbine shooter's parents would have said essentially the same thing.

Avatar for sabrtooth
iVillage Member
Registered: 12-03-1999
My kids' HS had zero tolerance for threats back when they were in it--10 years ago. Therefore, this is not a new and unusual concept. Even if her parents did not explain what ZERO tolerance ment, a supposed "A" student should be able to grasp the concept, as it is undoubtedly defined in her school handbook.
The school administrators, the guidance department, teachers and police cannot be expected to play psychiatrist, and try to decide what's a "real" threat and what is not. Plus, I have no desire for *MY* child, who is a teacher, to be subjected to threats --real or "pretend"-- nor to have her live with the worry that she might be molested or murdered in the parking lot. The wisest course of action is to treat ALL threats as "real".
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-30-2003

Exactly.

But I think there are adults out there who don't "get" it either.

Avatar for mahopac
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-24-1997

Without reading the article:

iVillage Member
Registered: 11-28-1999

I just think that kids today should know (after things like the Columbine shooting) that law enforcement has to take every threat seriously.