Mini-vent, working teen

iVillage Member
Registered: 11-28-1999
Mini-vent, working teen
12
Fri, 12-14-2012 - 11:11am

My son works part time.  Normally if they schedule him for a week night, it's 3-7 or 6-10, no more than 4 hours.  Now I know it's the week before Christmas but he still has school & plenty of homework (he has 7 classes, 2 of which are AP) and 2 nights this week they scheduled him from 3:30-10.  Of course they know he's in high school.  Does it not take any common sense for the manager to realize that a kid in school can't work 6 1/2 hours on a school night & have no time to do homework--or is he supposed to start his 2-3 hours of HW at 10:30?  Of course now he'll have to try to find someone to cover part of the hours.  Usually it's not that hard.  I told him to speak up, but he said he fears that he won't get any hours then, which I don't think is true.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Fri, 12-28-2012 - 5:26am
IMO it's not the manager's job to step forward and accommodate your son it's up to your son! What kind of job is it too? If the reality are the hours he's getting dumped with then that's all the more reason why he needs to speak up for himself! This is what worries me about kids having jobs during the school year, My oldest is only 15 and in my state you must be 16 to work, she won't be 16 until next August. She has volunteered and that's mostly been a Summer gig but I hesitate the whole kids having a job during the school year thing, It's just not necessary yet. The only time its brought up is when she asks for something that I tell her I won't buy her, I've told her that when she gets her own paying job she can buy it herself, Lol!

 


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 02-14-2000
Mon, 12-17-2012 - 2:31pm

LOL didn't mean to hijack your thread. Hope your ds was able to get someone to cover some of those long shifts. I guess this time of year management doesn't think about those types of logistics - it's all about how much $$ they can pull in!

Pam
Avatar for elc11
Community Leader
Registered: 06-16-1998
Sun, 12-16-2012 - 4:12pm

Music, I'll second Kimmy's observation that the employees who are available for the shifts before Christmas might be the ones to get the shifts after the holidays when staffing needs drop. My dd used to work in retail and said things like that. Now she works as a restaurant server and says it works the same in that industry. It does sound like his best bet is to get co-workers to cover the later hours of his shifts, if possible. 

Avatar for elc11
Community Leader
Registered: 06-16-1998
Sun, 12-16-2012 - 4:10pm

Music, I'll second Kimmy's observation that the employees who are available for the shifts before Christmas might be the ones to get the shifts after the holidays when staffing needs drop. My dd used to work in retail and said things like that. Now she works as a restaurant server and says it works the same in that industry. It does sound like his best bet is to get co-workers to cover the later hours of his shifts, if possible. 

iVillage Member
Registered: 11-28-1999
Sun, 12-16-2012 - 4:10pm

Well this has certainly gotten way off topic from my original thread!

For states that don't have regulations about people carrying guns, I still couldn't imagine that most elementary school teachers (most of whom are probably women) would carry a gun to work, where the dangers of little kids getting a hold of it and having an accidental shooting would vastly ouweigh the remote possibility of a person coming to school in a low crime area to shoot people.  All these mass shootings lately occurred at places where no one would expect such a thing to occure and wouldn't be on guard for it (a shopping mall, a move theater).  In our local shopping mall there are unarmed security guards and armed local police, but of course police couldn't be everywhere at once--there are probably 1-2 police officers in a big mall with 100 stores--by the time they got to an area where someone was shooting, it would be too late.  

I believe I have read (have to research this, but I'm on the way out) that in countries where no one owns guns except police/military of course the murder rate is much lower.  And I thought that the guy who killed the students in CT used guns that were owned by his mother so they were in fact legally owned (I assume) by a family member.  Now if this guy was in fact mentally ill (which hasn't been determined yet) I think it would be a bad idea to have guns in the house.

Avatar for elc11
Community Leader
Registered: 06-16-1998
Sun, 12-16-2012 - 3:59pm

Pam, about teachers having guns at school: pardon my ignorance in this matter, but how would that work? Would a teacher keep a gun in her/his desk drawer, or wear it concealed under a jacket, or ?? It seems like one would need to be wearing the gun at all times so as not to have to waste precious time in the event of an emergency. If the gun was stored in the desk drawer, wouldn't there be a concern of a kid somehow getting ahold of it---the same concern that drives many parents to  refuse to keep a gun in the home?

I'm not trying to debate or argue with anybody, I'm just curious. I'm not a "gun person" and guns are usually off my radar until a gun-related tragedy occurs and then everybody is talking about them for a while. I'm sure that the pros and cons of gun control will be in the media a lot in the coming weeks. I like to hear different points of view, and teachers having guns in school has never occured to me.

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-14-2000
Sat, 12-15-2012 - 4:53pm

Thanks for the info, Sam. You're right. Either the school district didn't allow their employees to have guns, none of them chose to have them, or the ones that did have them were unable to get to the gun man in time. I can't imagine a teacher or staff that had access to a gun would have just stood and watched him gun down 20 kids.

Pam
Avatar for sabrtooth
iVillage Member
Registered: 12-03-1999
Sat, 12-15-2012 - 2:27pm
Conneticut DOES have a Conceal and Carry law, and teachers CAN have them in schools. " ...It is unlawful to possess a firearm on public or private elementary or secondary school property. (HOWEVER) This prohibition shall NOT apply to a person with a firearm carrying permit, with permission from school officials..." Obviously, it made no difference.
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-14-2000
Sat, 12-15-2012 - 2:09pm

JMO but making it illegal to own guns isn't going to prevent people from getting them. Sure, it may prevent the good, law abiding citizens from owning them. But the criminal/crazies - nope. Many drugs are illegal so do you think that means no one does cocaine/heroin/meth/etc? During prohibition alcohol was illegal but it didn't stop people from drinking. Had the teachers/staff been allowed to have guns perhaps the shooter could have been taken down more quickly and more of the kids could have been saved. As it was they had to wait until police arrived. We're in IL and are the only state in the US that doesn't allow concealed carry. The court of appeals FINALLY struck down this ban so we'll be able to join the rest of the country. DH is a huge gun enthusiast and I've shot most of his guns. We're not hunters but enjoy target practice and it makes me feel safer knowing how to shoot a gun. I do respect people's right to not own guns but IMO making guns illegal for law abiding citizens would just give the criminals more power over them.

Pam
Avatar for suzyk2118
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-30-1997
Sat, 12-15-2012 - 1:07pm

Opposite problem here - ds is now off for winter break and is lifeguarding at 2 local YMCAs. Their shifts are 2 hours long!  Seems ridiculous to me when he can't make money other than maybe 2 hours/day!

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