Teens with jobs, what do they pay for?

Community Leader
Registered: 07-26-1999
Teens with jobs, what do they pay for?
21
Mon, 05-09-2011 - 11:12am

I'm just kind of curious what other parents do.

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Avatar for suzyk2118
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-30-1997
Mon, 05-09-2011 - 11:25am

It depends on what you want them to pay for. DS18 started lifeguarding at 15 - at that stage it was pretty much for his fun money as he had no car yet, and he worked year round but not that much during the school year so that was fine. Once he turned 16 it went for fun money and gas (insurance is way too expensive for him to be able to save for with the limited hours he works). Now in college I'm asking that some of his summer pay (still limited as they don't pay that well) will pay for his books so that he has a part in his education - that's about $1k/year or so; not that bad but it will cause him to have to budget now that he has to pay for gas, fun money and books, and his college gf will soon be 300 miles away this summer. (He's taking a class so he won't be able to work FT, nor do they seem to let kids in the summers around here)

Sue

P.S. Fun money means going out with friends, eating out with them, clothes beyond what he needs, movies, going to concerts, etc. - no more allowance once he's gone to college.

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-15-2004
Mon, 05-09-2011 - 11:49am

Our daughter is almost 16 and will be expected to have a job of some sort this summer (this is the first time -- the last several summers she was going to a camp in Colorado). We don't really have a hard and fast rule. Our thinking is that a portion of her money can be used for whatever she wants: clothes, eating with friends, shopping, movies, etc. However, some of that money will be used to help pay for gas or car insurance. I probably need to come up with actual percentages soon.

I think it's important that they not be able to use all of their money to just blow on things. They will quickly learn that things are expensive and the value of a dollar when they are helping pay for necessary expenses. Plus, they will also learn that no money = no driving, so they will be motivated to make their own money.

Avatar for sabrtooth
iVillage Member
Registered: 12-03-1999
Mon, 05-09-2011 - 12:58pm

They paid for everything not a necessity, like going out money, nails, polish, jewlery, video rentals, music, clothes beyond the basic budget, auto insurance, sticker, gas and maintainence.

Avatar for mahopac
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-24-1997
Mon, 05-09-2011 - 1:09pm

My now-18yo got his first regular summer job after his junior year of high school.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-22-1999
Mon, 05-09-2011 - 3:43pm

DS got a job not long after he turned 16.

Community Leader
Registered: 07-26-1999
Mon, 05-09-2011 - 4:19pm

Thanks ladies, and I definitely knew I would get a large variation of answers, and that was just what I was looking for.

Basically, I asked the question because DH got into a "discussion" about it this morning.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 05-15-2004
Mon, 05-09-2011 - 4:42pm

I tend to agree with you on this one and not your husband.

I don't think it's reasonable to expect her to pay for everything at this age. My belief has always been that when a child is still in school, that's their primary "job", and making acceptable grades should be their main focus. Anything they can make with their jobs is bonus, and if they are able to help pay for some things, then that's great. Your comment about having the rest of her life to have a job and make money is right.

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Community Leader
Registered: 07-26-1999
Mon, 05-09-2011 - 5:06pm
He doesn't feel like its necessary. Since she is not going to see her bio dad, its just MY parents (and he does love my parents to death and they have helped us out tremendously throughtout our entire marriage), he doesn't think its really necessary for her to make the trip up there. While he is "close" to his dad (not so much his step mom), he doesn't really understand the closeness in the relationship that me and Jordyn have with my parents. I don't know if that makes sense. His family was very poor while he was growing up, so he did have to work for everything he got from a very young age, so he thinks that regardless of how we are financially, she should have to be working for what she gets and not just grow up expecting things handed to her. And I don't expect to hand her things, but I grew up decidedly middle class, and while I worked as a teenager, it was just to pay for extras, my parents paid for certain things just as I expect her to pay, but I also know that there were plenty of things I wasn't able to do growing up because it wasn't in the budget or it wasn't anything I could save up for with my job and if we are able to give her (and all the kids) some of those things that we missed out on as kids because of our parents finances, why not? Why should she have to miss out on some things that she may never be able to do again because she isn't able to save up for it, but we were able to pay for it and just plain refused??

And yes, my philosophy has always been that school is your main job, and that's where your main focus should be, getting ready for college, etc. While he does value education, he looks at it more as a means to an end, but he doesn't believe that college, and a college degree are the end all be all, the certificate is helpful, but its not going to get you everything, hard work, responsibility, and common sense are going to get you farther than a college education. And, since she isn't planning on going into law or a doctor, "the money making degrees", why should she be working so hard at it? If that makes sense.
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iVillage Member
Registered: 05-15-2004
Mon, 05-09-2011 - 6:02pm

Yes,

Avatar for sabrtooth
iVillage Member
Registered: 12-03-1999
Mon, 05-09-2011 - 6:58pm

Our philosophy is that college is to be used to enable a kid to get a job and be self supporting.

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