Waking up

Avatar for janeannl
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-14-2003
Waking up
11
Tue, 08-17-2010 - 10:58am

My youngest daughter just started her senior year yesterday.

Pages

Avatar for coldfingers
Community Leader
Registered: 04-30-2000
In reply to: janeannl
Tue, 08-17-2010 - 11:49am

This can be

Photobucket
iVillage Member
Registered: 01-06-2000
In reply to: janeannl
Tue, 08-17-2010 - 12:04pm

I have to admit, I am one of the moms who will say that my child has been doing it since quite young.

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-05-2005
In reply to: janeannl
Tue, 08-17-2010 - 12:12pm

I think that telling her that she can't take friends is a good approach - ideally, it would be up to her to

iVillage Member
Registered: 11-01-2001
In reply to: janeannl
Tue, 08-17-2010 - 2:01pm

Some kids (and adults) simply have a difficult time getting moving in the morning. My fil, dh, and dd#1 are like this. It has nothing to do with a lack of sleep. Their energy level is fine once they get moving and stays high until late in the evening. In fact my dd will routinely ask to be woken up at 5am to get a final study session in and she's fine once she is up and moving.

At this point I'm willing to get my dd up and moving in the morning but we do talk about the need for her to do it on her own once she goes to college. We will likely invest in a vibrating alarm clock since she simply doesn't hear a typical alarm.

iVillage Member
Registered: 11-21-2004
In reply to: janeannl
Tue, 08-17-2010 - 2:42pm

Have her do it herself. STick to your guns and idea of letting her suffer her own consequence. A few times late to school will not ruin her life and it might just be the thing that gets her up every day along with an alarm clock across the room

Also, let her suffer the consequences of not picking up her friends. I know you hate to see them suffer, but trust me, they will not ride with her again if she's late and makes their day difficult. I've seen it happen.

Now if the car is funded by you etc... you also have the power to let her know that you'll give her three stikes and she's out of the car if she is late three times. Taking the car away is also incentive to get up.

She doesn't get up because you get her up. How do I know? Had the same problem with my son, and the other's did it themselves but I coddled this one, until I couldn't take the aggravation any longer and no longer woke him up. It wasn't pretty but it worked.

Avatar for janeannl
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-14-2003
In reply to: janeannl
Tue, 08-17-2010 - 3:06pm

I get what you and an earlier poster were saying about peer pressure, but (1) I've already told her that she can't take them, and (2) the one gal that lives quite a ways from school is the daugher of a single mom who does not have a car.

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-04-2005
In reply to: janeannl
Tue, 08-17-2010 - 4:01pm

hi,


Photobucket
Avatar for sabrtooth
iVillage Member
Registered: 12-03-1999
In reply to: janeannl
Tue, 08-17-2010 - 8:08pm

Both my dds and I are VERY Difficult to wake--and it has NOTHING to do with staying up too late, or being lazy. And "consequences" do no good when the person is physically hard to waken. It's like applying "consequences" to a one-legged kid for falling down too much!

For me, besides the alarm being on the other side of the room, (and even then, I sleep thru it for 30, 40, 60mins) DH has to call me on the phone. Usually TWICE, because I am supposed to call him back when I get OUT of bed. If I don't, he calls again.

For my kids, when they lived at home, Dh got ME up, and I got their wake-up meds in them about an hour BEFORE the time they were supposed to get up and function. And after banging on the door several times, I would pull them out of bed by the ankle.

Besides it not being their "fault" your statement...
<> pretty much sums up our school's philosophy also. So, if *I* was responsible, and if *I* would hear from DCFS if they were late too often, I made SURE they got up and functioned

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-16-1999
In reply to: janeannl
Tue, 08-17-2010 - 9:55pm
Her friends' disgust at her inability to get out of bed and get them all to school on time - thereby earning ALL of them detention (or whatever your school does) for being late is going to do a heck of a lot more for her learning to get her behind our of bed on time than anything you could do or say. I say, let her continue to take her friends to school - and if they're all late because she can't get going in the morning, peer pressure is a WONDERFUL thing sometimes! LOL
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-16-1999
In reply to: janeannl
Tue, 08-17-2010 - 10:03pm

<>

If you wait until she goes off to college to expect her to get out of bed on her own, you've waited too long! She needs to practice that skill long before she gets that old or you're going to have some rotten grades for those morning classes.

I have one that claimed he couldn't get out of bed before 7:30.. that's just the way his body worked. Yeah, I don't think so! He went to the army right after high school and his butt was out of bed at 5 every morning whether his body worked that way or not! Now, even when he's home on leave, he's usually up by 6:30 or so, even if there's no real reason to be up that early. Half the job is motivation! I don't do well in the mornings either, but I know I need to be at work by 7:30, so my alarm goes off at 5:30 so I can get a couple cups of coffee into me before it's time to leave. Your daugher needs to figure out what it's going to take to get her behind to school on time, and do it long before she goes to college or you're going to be wasting a lot of money on classes she has to retake coz she couldn't get out of bed.

Pages