Where do you live and are you affected by this cold weather?

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-14-2000
Where do you live and are you affected by this cold weather?
17
Mon, 01-27-2014 - 3:31pm

We're in central IL. The local schools are today on their 7th snow/cold day for the year. They only have to make up 5 max at the end of the year. It's currently 5 degrees and feels like -14. There's a wind advisory in place til noon tomorrow. Older ds that lives in WI is experiencing temps that don't even reach 0 today and tonight the low (real temp) is supposed to be -20 there. What's it like where you are?

Pam

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Community Leader
Registered: 07-26-1999
I would say yes, but not to the extent compared to the north. We live in Central Texas, and we did have freezing rain/sleet last Thursday/Friday which shut down schools, and have a possibility of it again overnight tonight. Its definitely unseasonably colder this winter compared to any of the other ones since we moved here.
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Avatar for suzyk2118
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-30-1997

STL - currently 14, feels like 0, going to 0 tonight.  Not fun. Yesterday was like 59.  Weird.

Sue

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-16-2009

No bad here. It is -16C (about 5F), suppose to feel like -21 C(-6F) but really it is not cold. We (DH, me and DS) just got in from shoveling the driveway. No big deal. I like the nip in the air; the air is fresh and clear.

I am a Canuck, lived here all my life. We put on our winter coats, hats and gloves and get on with it.  Schools are not cancelled, they rarely are. People go to work etc.. The only accomendation we make when it is cold is that kids have indoor recess when it get to -25C to -35C, depends on the principal. The homeless shelters open more beds for the homeless downtown with more frequent checks on those who refuse to sleep in the shelters.

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-08-2009

Yes it has been cold here this year in the Dallas Fort Worth area. The ice storms close down the roads and the schools until it thaws.  Last week was not as bad as back in December.  For some odd reason this area was mot as affected as further north or further south. 

Is this global warming?

Part of the situation here is the supply of natural gas which becomes very strained because it is the main heat source here. There is only so much gas available and so much gas that can be sent through the pipes. Many of the larger businesses, office buildings, colleges, and schools agree, via contracts for reduced rates, to close down when demand dramatically increases due to cold weather and supply is lacking. 

Over the Christmas holiday when we got together with some family members, one of the older cousins of our girl’s generation was home from University of Connecticut at Storrs. The house he lives in with several other grad students never has its power interrupted because it is located on the road between the co-generating facility and a major research hospital.  When classes resumed, most of the others were complaining about what they suffered when the power was out for several days.  He said, “Yeah, I know what you mean, as our cable was off for three days.”  LOL

I have gone from 20 below to 20 above in a period of a couple of hours and I can tell you it is as great a temp change as going from say 32 and 100 degrees.  I feel for those of you in the  below zero areas.

Avatar for sabrtooth
iVillage Member
Registered: 12-03-1999

Yes Kimmy, ironically enough this IS caused by global warming...

In the Arctic, temperature has increased at twice the rate as the rest of the globe, and could increase by another 8°C (14°F) by the end of this century.  Winter temperature has increased more than summer temperature, which is a trend that is expected to continue.  While some have suggested that these variations in temperature and associated sea ice melt are a natural cycle, recent research tells us that the Arctic was in a 2000 year cooling trend, before the 20th century and its influx of greenhouse gases.  The warming atmosphere along with new weather pattern extremes, is causing Arctic sea ice to melt at an alarming rate—12% per decade—that suggests the Arctic will be ice-free by 2030. The impacts of dwindling ice cover in the Arctic are far-reaching, from species endangerment to enhanced global warming, to the weakening or shut-down of global ocean circulation. 

Sea ice is generally moderated by sunlight—it grows in the winter and melts in the summer—but there are other factors at play in the decline of ice in the Arctic Ocean. Warm ocean currents travel north from the equator and usher in warmer and warmer water, making sea ice growth difficult. Weather patterns over the high mid-latitudes and the Arctic can also affect sea ice growth. Under normal climate conditions, cold air is confined to the Arctic by the polar vortex winds, which circle counter-clockwise around the North Pole.  As sea ice coverage decreases, the Arctic warms, high pressure builds, and the polar vortex weakens, sending cold air is spilling southward into the mid-latitudes, bringing record cold and fierce snowstorms.   At the same time, warm air is flowing into the Arctic to replace the cold air spilling south, which drives more sea ice loss.  These are part of the reason that Alaska is experiencing a WARMER winter than usual.

Avatar for turtletime
iVillage Member
Registered: 05-13-1998

Southern California. Little chilly this morning being only 45 but it should warm up to our year-round average of about 75. Then again, they are about to ration our water due to a 3 year drought. Lovely weather isn't free. 

Avatar for turtletime
iVillage Member
Registered: 05-13-1998

Not sure why this doubled!

iVillage Member
Registered: 11-28-1999

I live near Boston--yesterday was a 1 day break in the cold but it's back to the 20's, then by the weekend it should be in the 30's which I can handle.  I really do not like the cold.  Of course I have to go to work but after I get home I just don't feel like going out again.  So far I think our schools have had only 2 snow days--I've never heard of them cancelling for cold unless a school lost its heat.

I had an odd thing happen in the last snow storm.  I live in the suburbs and usually drive into the city--it should take only 1/2 hr to drive if there is no traffic but in rush hour it could take 1 hr.  Well if there is snow that starts during rush hour and plows haven't had time to get out, then I've had experiences where it takes 2 hrs!  I was trying to avoid that last week so I decided to take public transportation.  I drove to park at the closest garage.  So when I left work, I took the subway back to the garage--that part was fine.  I was parked on the 5th floor.  I was in line behind some other cars--and the line was not moving at all, not one inch, for about 45 mins.  I got out and asked someone what was happening.  The exit from the garage goes right on the highway so if the highway traffic was backed up, that meant that no one could get out!  Not to mention that more trains kept coming in with more passengers trying to get out and we have to wait for all the lower floors to empty out.  I figured I'd be there all night so I had to go to another station to get a bus to take me home--meanwhile waiting out in the cold for the bus and I wasn't dressed warmly enough to be standing outside even though I did have a hat and gloves.  That was just a bizarre experience.

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-27-1998

Cold is definitely in the eye of the beholder! I know people up here in NE love to laugh at the folks in the south who are paralyzed by a dusting of snow, but really, they're not used to it. Since they only get weather like this once in a while, it's not worth spending tax dollars to buy all the equipment and have workers attend the training that they'd need to cope well with a storm like the one they just got.  Most of the time, the salt, sand and plows would just sit in a garage somewhere. So I get that southerners are going to suffer more when they get weather that's normal for a northern climate..

That said, I really hate the frigid, colder-than-normal temps we've seen this month in MA, but I'm definitely getting used to them. I think you can get used to anything if you live with it long enough. I'd rather have to get used to balmy beach weather, though!

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-08-2009

Musiclover, it could have been FAR worse for you.   Did you see the news story on the iced roads down in Atlanta and Alabama where traffic came to a halt, cars ran out of gas, and total gridlock occurred for thousands of people on the interstates, babies were born on the roads.  And several thousand school kids and their teachers got trapped at the schools overnight. 

Decades ago, among many other stupid things I did, I left for a one hundred mile drive down the interstate just as the snow started falling.  I arrived about nine hours later.  The last six hours were at about 5 MPH or less. 

Another thing that makes these ice storms more of a problem down here in the southern states is that we don’t have all the snow clearing equipment that the cities, counties, and states up north have.  It is somewhat like “not building a church sanctuary for the Easter Sunday crowd.

Sabrtooth, another possibility is that we are into a repeat of the “little ice age” that occurred between about 1300 AD and 1800 AD and was preceded by a warmer period.  Some glaciers actually grew, the weather change resulted in starvation, rivers and lakes regularly froze over, when they had not done so previously, etcetera.  (I remember it well because I was a little girl when it occurred.  LOL  Sometimes I do feel that old.)  Wikipedia has a long and interesting article on the subject and how some think it was not a global ice age, some say it was brought on by the ‘black plague” decline in human population,  a change in sun cycles or movements of ocean waters, etcetera, but who knows?  An interesting read.

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